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Full text of "Athlete, The"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196061unse 




High School Afhkfe 



PADUCAH TILGHMAN HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A.':CHAMPION--1960 



■^ ^ 1^ 







4s # ^^i -V 



A - 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Batboy Stokes, Hunt, Ragland, Carr, 
Oakley, Troutman, Warfield, Nannie. Second Row: Mgr. Harris, M. Brad- 
ford, L. Bradford, Collier, Mills, Goodman, Young, Moore, Coach DeSpain. 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

AUGUST - laSD 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 20-21, I960 

duPont Manual High School Track Team—K. H. S. A. A. Champion 1960 




(Left to Right 1 rent Hon: Shanzcr. Warren. 
Payne, Coffey, Schuermo cr. Nels(.n. Second Row: 
Wright, Clark, Burns. Dumitru, Kfllv. Dixon, McG 
Young, McCamish, Askridge, R. Taylor, Greene, Alii 



erson. Hunl-nian. l.i>" i^, Dotric- 
no, Allen. G. .Mcl'her.son. Powe 
Third Row: Alexander, Yate 
Torstrick, MuUins, Vance. 



,\lcl'IUTs,)n 
ay. Cro.sby 
Taylor, Waggoner, 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Oser — Trinity 

2. Maguire — Somerset 

3. Reed— M.M.I. 

4. Bersot — Atherton 

5. Cogswell — St. Xavier 

Time: 15.4 

Mile Relay — 

1. Manual 

2. Highlands 

3. Trinity 

4. Waggener 

Time: 3:30.6 
(New Record) 

180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Lienhardt — Newport 

2. Myers— M.M.I. 

3. Nuekols— Temple Hill 

4. Meredith — Lafayette 

5. Dowden — Atherton 

Time: 21.0 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Jokl — Lafayette 

2. Schwartz — Atherton 

3. Walker — Waggener 

4. Moss — Henderson Douglass 

5. Helmers — Owensboro 

Time:50.2 
Jokl set a new state record of 50.2. 



100 Yard Dash- 



1. Lewis — Manual 

2. Moore — Manual 

3. Martin— Trinity 

4. Hendricks — Bowling Green 

5. Rogers — Henry Clay 

Time: 10.0 

Shot Put— 

1. Wright — Manual 

2. Carter— Butler 

3. Bell— Eastern 

4. Clark — Manual 

5. Maddox — Wurtland 

Distance: 51'%" 

Mile Run — 

1. Mathis — Waggener 

2. Basham — Daviess Co. 

3. O'Bannon — Central 

4. Cawood — Harlan 

5. Well.s— M.M.I. 

Time: 4:34.3 

Pole Vault— 

1. Schott — Hazel Green 
1. Jennings — Holmes 

3. Hurt — Eastern 

4. Rippy — Butler 
4. Pennick — Valley 

4, Carlisle — Simon Kenton 

Height: 11'3" 



220 Yard Dash— 

1. Lewis — Manual 

2. Jokl — Lafayette 

3. Schwartz — Atherton 

4. Hendricks — Bowling Green 

5. Sweatt — High Street 

Time: 22.7 



Broad Jump — 

1. Meyers— M.M.I. 

2. Lewis — Manual 

3. Zachary — Pineville 

4. Dowden — Atherton 

5. McPherson — Manual 

Distance: 21'10y2" 

880 Yard Run— 

1. Mathis — Waggener 

2. Basham — Daviess Co. 

3. White — Waggener 

4. Caywood — Danville 

5. Garvin — College High 

Time: 2:02.8 

880 Yard Relay— 

1. Manual 

2. Trinity 

3. Male 

4. Henry Clay 

5. Ashland 

Time: 1:31.3 
Manual set a new state record of 
1:30.6 in the qualifying heat. 
(Continued on Page Six) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1960 



.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky. July 8. 19fi0 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received we have made an audit 
of the hooks and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year b 
ginning July 1, 1959, and ending June 30, 1960. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the 
Receipts and Disbursements, which in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, i960. 
The cash funds on Hand and U. S. Savngs Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from, your 
depositories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1959 TO JUNE 30, 1960 

STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking Account July 1, 1959 $10,742.37 

Annual Dues: 445 «ji $3.00 $ 1,335.00 

Officials' Dues: 

Football: 391 @ $3.00 1,173.00 

Basketball: 1,155 @ $3.00 3,465.00 

Reciprocity Officials : 

Football: 29 ra> $1.00 29.00 

Basketball: 24 (3' $1.00 24.00 

Officials' Fines: 21 (§> $5.00 105.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks made good) 47.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1,010.00 

Sale of Rules Books 55.85 

Sale of Equipment 25.00 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 237.00 

Interest Received from Government 

Bonds 1,326.00 

Interest Received from 1st. Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. 262.50 

Interest Received from Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. 163.33 

Transferred from Union Fed. Loan 

Ass'n. Savings Account 8,000.00 

Temporary Loan from 1st Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. 5,000.00 

Short-Term Loan (First National) 10,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 91,281.29 

Refunds 597.72 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament.- 658.50 

Overpayment - 12.00 

Football Playoffs: 

A & AA Ticket Sales 2,881.50 

Program Advertising 524.00 

Profit AAA 1,016.87 

Program Sales 159.18 $129,388.74 

$140,131.11 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4,588.04 

Commissioner's Salark (Base Sal. $10,500) 7,638.88 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 380.43 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $7,500) 6,073.80 

Travel Expense - Ass't Commissioner 662.61 

Clerical Help 5,839.16 

Janitor Service 846.82 

Postage 1,709.72 

Office Supplies 688.17 

Janitor Supplies 88.69 



Purchase of New Equipment 581.22 

Insurance 412.09 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts 616.63 

Building Reoairs 139.49 

Payment of Short Term Loan & Interest 10,251.39 

Utilities 834.69 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,456.24 

Investigations — Board of Control 17.80 

Fidelity Bonds 43.78 

Printing 1,731.70 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Charity Ass'n 500.00 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 200.00 

Purchase of National Federation Publications 1,954.16 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 2,358.20 

National Federation Dues 126.45 

Girls Division - NSGWS 300.00 

Rental on Films 261.00 

Audit 50.00 

Refunds 16.31 

Bad Checks 53.00 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1,900.00 

Speaker - Annual Banquet 50.00 

Taxes and Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld $ 3,486.80 

Sociay Security 1,061.86 

City Income Tax Withheld 396.73 

State Income Tax Withheld 607.84 

Hospitalization Withheld 255.10 

Retirement Fund Withheld 800.00 6,608.38 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 13,000.00 

To K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund 300.00 13,300.00 

Insurance Subsidy 12,957.50 

Magazine : 

Printing and Engravings 3,869.77 

Mailing 110.00 3,979.77 

Officials' Division : 

Honorariums and Expenses - Clinics $ 1,134.49 

Printing and Miscellaneous Expense 73.75 

Schools for Officials 1,202.55 

Expenses - Regional Basketball 

Clinics 215.37 

Officials' Emblems 386.76 $ 3,012.92 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense $ 329.38 

Trophies and Medals (State Meet)__ 397.19 

Officials (State Meet) 245.60 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 2,096.35 3,068.52 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) $ 742.80 

Trophies and Awards 880.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 83.38 1,706.25 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) $ 536.20 

Trophies and Balls 2,127.93 

Expenses - Tournament Managers 241.96 2,906.09 

Track : 

Regional Expense $ 438.05 

Trophies and Medals 1,539.27 

State Committee Expense 823.41 

Officials 804.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 6,850.95 

New Equipment 35.40 10,491.08 

Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits $ 2,511.49 

Trophies and Awards 1,985.44 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 180.62 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 113.38 

Transportation (State Tournaments) 576.00 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,066.00 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 

AUGUST, 1960 VOL. XXIH— NO. 1 J^ MeiH 0110112 

Published monthly, except Jane and July, by the Kentucky John E. RobinSOn 
High School Athletic Association 

oHice of Publication. Lexingrton, Ky. Johii Earl Robinson, Superintendent ot 

Entered "^■^Xctj'lfSdrl^ let *^' Crcht^sTl'^""'^^ Danville City Schools, died at the Veterans 

Editor THEo. A. sANFORD Administration Hospital, Louisville, Ken- 

Assistant Editor.. .^.„„„..^--- J. B. MANSFIELD ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ jgg^^ ^j^^^. ^^ jjj^^ggg ^^ 

BOARD OF CONTROL Several months. Mr. Robinson w^as promin- 

v[ctl^«VdVn7.V:.-:::::::.^.!L^is 'SSireir(i9B??6'iK'Mario" ent in Kentucky educational circles. For a 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus npvind bpp'inninp- in 1 Q4Q he was a rBffister- 

(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville: Robert PCl OQ, Ueginnin|_ in i»^a, ne Wdb d, i^^i^l-ei 

P. Forsythe (1959-63). Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), ed basketball OlllCial With the K.H.S.A.A. 

Georeetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. ,;, t^ , . , . t. • i j t. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year Mr. Robinson w^as bom in Richvk'ood, Boone 

=^^ County, Kentucky, on July 4, 1917. He w^as 

(^ I /~* , . > fi^H' ^ gra(iuate of the Hebron High School and 

J:rom the LommiSSlonei S ijffice of Eastern Kentucky State College. On July 

27, 1939, he married Miss Mary Lois Clark. 

Football Clinics To this union were bom three children, 

ml ii^nr. 1- • jy jr i-i 11 -cjr- • 1 -n Betsy, Patricia Ann, and John Earl, Jr. In 

The 1960 clinics for football officials will ^gg^.^Q ^^ ^^^^^ mathematics at the Owen- 

bf ^"'^^r^?'! ^\ Athletic Director Edgar Mc- ^^,^ jjj^ g^^^^j ^^^ ^^^ following year was 

Nabb, Assistant Principal of the Beechwood -in^ipal and coach at the King's Mountain 

S'lu u'^°f' ^^"1^ S'L^c^A^?^"- "■• ^''' High School in Lincoln County. 
Nabb has been the K.H.S.A.A. representa- t -.r.^-. ht -r. , • u i • i.i. 
tive on the National Federation Football Com- I", 1941 Mr Robinson began work in the 
mittee for several vears. The dates and sites construction field where he reniained until 
of the clinics are as follows: August 14, Ash- ^e was called mto the Military Service In 
land Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P.M. (EST) ; August 15, 1^43 he entereci the United States Navy 
Pikeville High School, 8:00 P.M. (EST); where he served m the South Pacific Theater. 
August 16, Bell High School. Pineville, 8:00 ?« was discharged in December 1945. The 
miT /r^orriN A i. 01 Ti 1- o TT- 1, lollowing spriBghe entered graduate school 
P.M. (EST) ; August 21, Bowling Green High ^^ ^^^ University of Kentucky, where he re- 
School, 8 :00 P.M. (CDT) ; August 22, May- ceived his Master of Science degree in Edu- 
field High School, 8:00 P.M. (CST) ; August cation and completed two additional years 
23, Henderson High School, 8:00 P.M. of graduate work. His major during these 
(CDT); August 28, Newport High School, ^^ars was in Educational Administration, 
o AA r. T\T /TTiornN A J- OH TT • ■ i- "-^ complcted all of his work for the Doctor 
8:00 P.M. (EST); August 29, Lmversity of Education degree except the dissertation. 
High School, Lexington, 8:00 P.M. (EST); While at the University he was the recipient 
August 30, Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 8:00 of the Margaret Voorhies Haggin Fellowship 
P.M (CDT) ^^^ served as a graduate assistant in the col- 
lege of Education. Mr. Robinson went to 
Registration of Officials Murray in 1948 as Director of Teacher Edu- 
_, ,, „ , , , , „ ,.^. . , . , cation and associate professor of education 
Football and basketball officials previously at Murray State College. He was there four 
registered have received their renewal ap- years. In 1952 he accepted the superintend- 
plication cards for the 1960-61 school year, ency at Danville. 

Approximately one hundred officials failed During the years of his professional ca- 
to file their 1959-60 reports on or before the reer Mr. Robinson served as Vice-President 
deadline set by the Board of Control for the ^^^ President of the Kentucky Association 
submitting of reports, and it was necessary ^i^^'^T* Teaching, President of the Ken- 
, . „. ., ^j.. . 1 , p ., , tucky Association of Student Teaching, 
to impose fines on these officials who failed President of the Kentucky Association See- 
to comply with Association rules. It is an ondary School Principals, Vice-President of 
Association requirement that each registered the Kentucky Association of School Admin- 
official attend the clinic in the sport in which istrators, and as a director of the Kentucky 

he is registered. Five football officials and ^„^^Tu^*'''" ""l ^"""^T^ Administrators. In 

1953 he was chosen to participate in the Na- 

fifty-seven basketball officials were suspend- tional Superintendents Work Conference at 

ed in 1959-60 for failure to attend clinics. Columbia University. He was a member of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Three 



the First Christian Church (Deacon), Ma- 
sonic Lodge, Scottish Rite, Shrine, Danville 
Chamber of Commerce, Rotary International, 
American Association of School Administra- 
tors, a life member of the Kentucky Educa- 
tion Associationv-a life member of the Na- 
tional Education Association, a life member 
of the Eastern Alumni Association, a mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi- 
He served on the Executive Committee of 
Eastern's Alumni Association and as a rep- 
resentative of Eastern on the Kentucky Joint 
Alumni Council, and at his death was serving 
as President of the Kentucky Joint Alumni 
Council. 

— D.R.R. 

(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



ST. XAVIER'S CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 



AUDIT— 

(Continued from Page Oi 

Ticket Sellers and Takers (State 


le) 

60.00 
576.00 

25.00 
210.00 

49.00 
30.00 




Lodging (State Tournament) 






Umpires (State Tournament) 

Expenses - Ass't. Manager ( State 

Tournament) 

Grounds Men (State Tournament) 


7,372.93 






874.30 
406.63 
33.91 
56.40 


3,700.00 


Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 










Expenses - Regional Meets 




1,371.24 








Football Playoffs: 


$ 


529.42 
973.08 
760.00 
811.00 
1,604.80 
219.99 
240.00 
149.00 
10.00 
25.00 
224.88 

104.80 






















Meals — 












Officials 

Ticket Sellers, Takers & Guards 


nil 




P. A. and Scoreboard 






Commission on Program Sale 




5,651.97 












$128,497.07 












$140,131.11 


Disbursements 




128.497.07 










Cash Balance 


$ 11.6.34.04 


BANK RECONCILEMENT: 


30, 1960 


$ 


12,384.06 


Less Outstanding: Checks : 

No. 488 — ___ „ 


.$ 15.90 






No. 655 


. 22.00 
. 159.20 




No. 656 




No. 675 .. 


. 43.65 
. 43.65 
8.40 
. 134.50 
. 227.50 
. 14.44 
. 48.00 
. 36.00 
. 60.00 




No. 677 




No. 700 __. _ 




No. 707 _ 




No. 708 




No. 765 _ _. _ 




No. 767 _ 




No. 776 




No. 833 ___ _. 




No. 848 




No. 851 - 


9.95 

20.55 

. 153.48 




No. 852 




No. 856 






(Left to Right): Bro. Valens, Coach; Micky Schad and 
John Evans of the state championship doubles team; Jackie 
Cooper, state singlels champion. 

No. 857 3.76 

No. 858 33.12 

No. 859 13.50 

No. 860 102.42 1,250.02 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1960 $ 11,634.04 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - Firrst National 

Bank & Trust Co. $11,634.04 

U. S. Savings Bonds (Value June 30, 1960) 48,994.40 
Savings Account - 1st Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n. 10,000.00 

Savings Account - Union Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n. 10,000.00 

Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1960 $80,628.44 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. Building and 
Equipment $98,820.10 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1960 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $127,215.00 

Radio and Television 3,550.00 

Profit on Program 1,740.65 $132,505.65 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 960.42 

Trophies and Awards 653.67 

Refunds 20.00 

Public Liability Insurance 642.60 

Incidental Expense - (16) Teams 8,000.00 

Transportation 1,407.30 

Lodging 3,960.72 

Meals 5,536.27 

Coliseum Rental 9,000.00 

Organist 55.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,582.80 

Scorers and Timers 480.00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 240.00 

Ushers ,— 4,440.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers, and Guards- 1,902.35 

Public Address Announcers 170.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 74.45 

Films 275.00 

Towel Service 75.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses -Tournament 

Manager 56.00 

Honorariums andd Expenses - 

Ass't. Tour. Managers 1,015.11 

Bad Checks 232.00 

Detectvie Service 420.67 

Audit 25.00 $ 41,224J6 

Transfer of Funds - Amount Transferred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $ 91,281.29 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



TRINITY GOLF TEAM WINS STATE 
TOURNAMENT 

The Trinity High School of Louisville won the 1960 State 
High School Golf Tournament. Trinity High School, sparked by 
Jim Ferriell's eagle-birdie-par finish, won the team title by one 
stroke in a playoff with Maysvlile after both had finished the 
regulation distance with a 643 aggregate. Trinity won the team 
trophy by one stroke on the second hole of the sudden-death 
playoff, the first in the history of the state meet. It was only 
the second playoff ever needed in the individual chase. The 
tournament was held at P'ort Knox Lindsey Golf Course on 
May 23-24, and was managed by Coach John W. Hatchett of 
the Fort Knox H^gh School. The Seneca High School team was 
third with a score of 649. Other team scores were: Waggener, 
653 ; Mayfield, 664 : St. Xavier, 666 ; Owensboro, 667 : DeSales, 
682 ; Flaget. 685 ; Durrett, 688 ; Ft. Knox, 690 ; Elizabethtown, 
725. 



TRINITY'S CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF TEAM 





Steve Lyles, State Champion 

Steve Lyles of Scottsville was individual champion with 
a score of 151. He tied with Dave Baron of St. Xavier on the 
regulation distance, and won the first hole of a sudden-death 
playoff. Tommy Settle of Owensboro was third with 162. 

Winners in the Driving. Putting, and Approaching con- 
tests were as follows: Driving— K. Wells, Paintsville, 264 yards. 
Putting— T. Settle, Owensboro, 22 inches from hole. Approach- 
ing — J. Vance. Atherton, holed out. 

One hundred boys took part in the tournament. Individual 
scores of some of the leaders are as follows: 

151— S. Lyles (Scottsville); D. Baron (St. Xavier) 

1,52— T. Settle (Owensboro I 

15.3— B. Day (Seneca) : C. Kirk (Maysville) 

154— J. Ferriell (Trinity) 

156— E. Nelson (Pikeville) 

157— B. Doll (DeSales I 

158— E. Denham (Seneca): D. Hill (Maysville) 
159— M. Demling (Trinity) 

160— B. Adams (Berea): T. Brauner (Trinity); G. Sledge 
(Bowling Green) 

161 — C. Traxel (Maysville) : R. Spragens (Lebanon) : D. 
Brohman (Trinity) ; R. Acree (Waggener) 

162— M. Klein (Flaget) ; L. Newton (Fulton) ; J. Burrice 
(Waggener) 

163— J. Belote (Mayfield) ; H. Hoskins (Danville) ; P. 
Scherer (Waggener) 

164 — E. Edinger (Seneca) 

165— J. Atkins (Mayfield) ; D. Hite (Lexington Catholic) 

166— M. Silliman (St. Xavier) ; R. Acree (Waggener) 

167— H. Ormsby (Country Day) ; L. Gilbert (Vine Grove) ; 
T. Frith (Waggener) 

168— M. Kirsten (Ft. Knox) ; D. Hunt (Mayfield) ; J. Eoy 
(Country Day) : L. Harp (Mayfield) 

169— S. Miller (Durrett) ; A. Cooper (Fern Creek) ; J. 
Dockter (Trinity) 

170 — J. Hamilton (Bardstown, St. Joseph) ; B. Eastwood 
(Dixie Heights) ; W. Munz (Fern Creek) ; K, Wells (Paints- 
ville) : J. Olyniec (Bowling Green St. Joseph). 




eft 111 Kiehll 



Front Kiiw : Bruhn 
Grenoagh doac! 



Demling. 
Brauner. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 



The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K,H,S,A.A. 
Building in Lexington, on Saturday afternoon. May 
21, 1960, The meeting was called to order at 5:30, 
with all Board members and Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that the reading of the miniites of the April 22nd 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

President Williamson stated that the first order 
of business would be the selection of the State High 
School Basketball Tournament site for 1961. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Robert P. 
Forsythe, that the 1961 State High School Basketball 
Tournament be held in Louisville. Voting on this mo- 
tion resulted in a 4-4 tie. 

Cecil A, Thornton moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the 1961 State High School Basketball 
Tournament be held in Lexington. Voting on this mo- 
tion resulted in a 4-4 tie. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the State High School Basketball Tournament be 
held in Lexington in 1961, and that the tournament 
be held in Louisville in 1962; that the tournament 
alternate between the two locations in this order until 
such time as this arrangement shall be changed by a 
vote of this Board; and that it be understood further 
that this arrangement is contingent upon satisfactory 
arrangeinents being made between the State Tourna- 
ment manager and those in charge of the tournament 
sites, such arrangements to be approved by the Board 
of Control. Robert P. Forsythe moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the motion made by Mr. Jones be 
amended to reverse the order of the sites. The vote 
on the amendment resulted in a 4-4 tie. The vote was 
then taken on the original motion, with a 4-4 vote 
resulting. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field, that the original Jones motion be adopted, ex- 
cept that it be determined by lot whether Lexington 
or Louisville will be the site for the 1961 tournament, 
with the other city being named the site for 1962. 

(Continued on Page Fourteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 
June 8 - 9, 1960 

Newport Catholic (2) 

\ Caverna (5) 

Owensboro (3) 



Caverna (6) 



Liberty (1) 



Owensboro (16) 



Atherton (2) 



Paducah Tilghman (9) 
Middlesboro (2) 



Ashland (7) 



Owensboro (8) 



Paducah Tilghman (7) 



Paducah Tilghman (7) 



Paducah Tilghman — 
Champion 



1 Ashland (4) 



First Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 13 - 14, 1960 
SINGLES 



DeLozier - Shawnee 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

DeLozier 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

DeLozier 
6-0; 6-0 






FINALS 


Bye 

Pope - College 


Nelson 
6-4; 6-2 




Wagner 
6-0; 6-0 




Nelson - Franklin Co. 


Weber 
6-0; 6-2 


DeLozier 
6-1; 6-1 


Bryan - College 


Sullivan 
6-4; 6-1 


Weber - Assumption 


Wagner 
6-3; 6-4 


Pruitt - Eastern 


Sullivan 
6-0; 6-0 


Wagner - Atherton 


Sullivan 
6-0; 6-0 


Sullivan - Waggener 


Wright - Berea 


Thoney 
(default) 


Rice - Hopkinsville 


Steilberg 
6-3; 5-7; 6-2 


Thoney - Bellevue 


Galloway 
6-1; 6-3 


Hohmann - Atherton 








Galloway - Owensboro 


Steilberg 
6-1; 6-0 








Taylor - Waggener 










Steilberg - Presentation 







DeLozier 
6-2; 6-2 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Twenty-Eighth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 



Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 16 - 17, 
SINGLES 



1960 



Evans - St. Xavier 



QUARTER- 
FINALS 



Bye 1 


Evans 


Evans 
6-1: 6-1 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Evans 
6-1 :6-4 


FINALS 

Evans 
6-3: 6-2 






Bishop 






Smith 
6-2: 6-4 










Simms 








Simms - Bellevue 


McNerney 
6-1: 6-2 




Bve 1- 






Smith 






McConnell 
6-4: 4-6: 6-3 










Davis 
6-2: 6-3 








Davis - St. Joseph 


Cooper 
6-1: 6-2 




Goodykoontz - Southerni 




McConnell 








McConnell - Eastern 


McNerney 
6-2: 6-1 




Bye 1 


Light 
McNerney 

Duckor 








Light - Hopkinsvlile 


Hamblen 
6-1 : 6-1 




Bye 1- 








McNerney - Flaget 


Hamblen 
1-6: 6-1:6-3 


Cooper 
4-6: 6-2: 6-3 


Bye 1' 


Duckor - K.M.I. 










Hamblen 








Hamblen - Bellevue 


Evans 
6-1 :6-l 




Bye 1" 


Evans 




Evans - Berea 


Cooper 
6-1 : 6-1 








Bye 1- 


Anderson 
6-3 ; 6-4 








Eobert - Henry Clay 


McGill 
6-2 : 6-1 




Anderson - Ft. Knox |" 


Baldree 

6-7 : 6-4 : 6-3 








Baldree - Hopkinsville 
Klein - Durrett 1 








McGill 




McGill - Flaget 

Bye 1- 


Cooper 
6-0 : 6-0 




Tippen 




Tippen - Owensboro 
Bye 1 






Cooper - St. Xavier 
Bye 1 


Cooper 









TRACK MEET— 

(Continued from Inside Cover) 
Discus — 

1. Carter— Butler 

2. Herfel— Highlands 

3. Fischer— St. Xavier 

4. Helm— High Street 

5. Shepherd — Male 

Distance: 148'2" 

High Jump — 

1. Knox— M.M.L 

1. Glass— Central 

3. Overman — Bellevue 

3. Huntsman — Manual 

5. McGee— Ashland 

5. Scharber — Daviess Co. 



5. Bingham — Middlesboro 
5. Carlisle — Valley 

Height: 511" 



TOTAL POINTS 

Manual 55 '/z 

Trinity 23 

Waggener 22 

M.M.I. 19 

Lafayette 14 

Atherton 12 

Highlands 12 

Butler 11 

Daviess Co. 8!4 

Lou. Central 8 

Male 7 

Eastern 6 

Newport 6 

Henry Clay 5 



Hazel Green 5 

Holmes 5 

Somerset 4 

St. Xavier 4 

Bowling Green 4 

High Street 3 

Pineville 3 

Temple Hill 3 

Bellevue 2Vz 

Ashland 2'A 

Danville 2 

Henderson Douglass 2 

Harlan 2 

Valley I'A 

College High 1 

Owensboro 1 

Wurtland 1 

Simon Kenton 1 

Middlesboro [A 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Seven 



TENNIS DOUBLES— BOYS 



St. Xavier 


St. Xavier 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

- St. Xavier 
6-0; 6-0 


FINALS 




Bye 


Hopkinsville 








Hopkinsville 


Bellevue 
6-2; 6-1 








Bye 


Eastern 
6-3; 6-4 


St. Xavier 
6-1; 6-0 




Eastern 


Flaget 

6-1; 5-7; 6-1 




Harlan 


Bellevue 




Bellevue 


Trinity 
6-3; 6-1 




Bye 


Trinity 
6-2; 6-0 


Trinity 




University 


Owensboro 




Bye 


Flaget 
6-0; 6-1 






St. Joseph 




Bye 








St. Joseph 


Flaget 








Bye 










Flaget 







St. Xavier 
4-6; 6-1; 6-3 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1959-60. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abemathy, George E., 2-21-1-0; Acre, Russell L. 0-1-0-0: 
Adkins, Raymond C, 28-24-3-2 ; Akins, Charlie, 1-17-4-0 ; 
Akridge, Dean, 15-20-4-0 : Alexander, Rex, 24-6-2-0 : Allen, 
Jack R., 2-6-0-0 ; Allen, James W., 0-1-2-1 ; Allen, Lowry R., 
14-21-3-1 ; Almon, James H., 1-10-1-0 ; Allen, Nelson R. 11-24- 
4-0 ; Amburgey, Jesse, 0-2-1-0 : Arnold, Kenneth Lee, 82-38- 
B-1 ; Ashley, Kenneth, 0-2-5-3 ; Austin, Ray, 0-0-2-2. 

Bailey, Arville. 3-10-7-0 ; Baird, Bill 8-2-0-0 ; Baker, James 
E., 14-9-0-3; Ballaban, Thomas, 6-6-0-0; Ballard, Jack H., 
15-8-4-0 ; Ballinger, Richard L., 1-16-1-1 ; Bankemper, Thomas 
F., 0-6-2-0; Barker, Walter D., 4-7-2-0; Barlow, Billy, 10-12- 
3-1 ; Barnes, Judson, 1-3-0-0 ; Barry, Harold L., 0-1-0-0 ; Bart- 
ley, Robert F., 0-2-0-0 ; Barton, W. Walter, 1-2-3-1 ; Baskin, 
Sylvester, 2-8-0-0 ; Bates, Gardner, 5-3-0-2 ; Beard, Monie, 
3-2-0-0 : Bell, Clarence T., 6-9-1-0 ; Bell, Henry Burnett, 0-3- 
0-0 Bell, Jimmy D.. 0-0-1-0 : Benedict, Johnny, 5-1-0-0 ; Ben- 
nett, Bert A., 1-15-3-1 ; Bennett, Gene, 4-4-2-0 ; Bentley, James, 
0-2-5-2; Bibb, William C, 7-6-0-0; Bigelow, Ralph, 0-2-2-0; 
Billings, B. E., 1-0-0-0 ; Bishop, David G., 0-2-0-0 : Black, Char- 
les D., 19-14-1-1 : Black, William A.. 0-0-1-0 ; Blackburn, 
Adrian, 2-4-1-0 ; Blackburn, Clyde W., 10-9-2-1 ; Blackburn, 
Tennyson R., 0-1-0-0 ; Blackburn, Viley O., 4-4-0-0 ; Blanken- 
ship, Zeb, 2-5-1-0 ; Blanton, Clayton, 0-2-0-0 ; Blevins, Boone, 
Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Boatright, Carl Hughes, 0-5-1-0 ; Boehm, Robert 
R., 4-3-4-0 ; Borden, W. B. "Jack", 8-12-3-0 ; Bowling, Roy, 
2-4-1-1 : Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 8-7-4-0 ; Boyd, Tommy. 
0-0-1-0 ; Boyles, Paul E. 21-26-5-0 ; Bradford, Earl E., 3-10-1-0 ; 
Bradshaw, Bill, 3-9-2-1 ; Branaman, Bill. Jr., 11-15-3-0 ; Braugh- 
ler, David L., 1-1-0-0 ; Breeden, Charles, 1-3-1-0 ; Brewer, 
Randell, 3-7-1-2 : Brichler, Joe A., 3-11-1-0 ; Bridges, Bennie 
E., 32-16-2-0 ; Brizendine, Vic, 30-38-7-0 ; Broderick, Carroll A., 
34-37-6-5; Brooks, James A., 4-3-1-4; Brown, Bryant, 5-10-0-0; 
Brown, E. C, 2-34-1-0 ; Brown, Eddie, 0-4-2-1 ; Brown, James 
A., 8-1-1-0; Brown, James W., 22-18-4-2; Brown, J. Carlton, 
13-30-1-0 : Brown, John W., 17-28-1-1 ; Brown, Thomas, 0-5-1-0 ; 
Brugh, Walter, 2-16-2-1 ; Brummett, Joseph W., 15-19-0-0 ; 



Bruner, Jack C. 10-20-7-4; Buis, Nathaniel, 5-31-1-0; Bunn. 
Harold, 0-2-0-0; Bunnell, K. L., 10-16-6-3; Burchctt, Lanier S. 
2-19-3-3 ; Burns, Ronnie . 1-6-0-0 : Burris, John F., Jr., 0-2-0-0 " 
Burton, Charlie, 0-10-2-0 : Butcher, Granville "Bo", 22-19- 
6-3; Butcher, Paul, 3-6-0-0; Butner, William M., 0-1-0-0; 
Butts, Delbert, 1-0-0-0 ; Buzzerio, Larry, 24-16-1-0. 

Caldwell, James, 2-14-3-1; Campbell, French. 15-25-3-2; 
Campbell, Harold L., 0-2-1-0: Campbell, John, Jr.. 18-10-1-0; 
Canady, Ray B., 6-4-0-0 ; Canter, John, 0-4-2-0 ; Cantrell, 
Hubert Edward, 0-1-1-0 ; Caple, Harold E., 6-1-0-0 ; Carpenter, 
Leonard F., 8-20-1-1 ; Carr, Gene P., 0-6-5-0 ; Carroll, Joe E., 
0-1-0-0 : Cartee, Ralph, Jr., 24-12-0-1 ; Cassady, Charles W.. 
7-12-3-2 : Cassady, Richard, 4-16-2-0 ; Casteel, Ralph M., 7-6- 
2-1 ; Gates, Thomas H., 2-4-0-0 : Cates, Vernon R., 3-3-1-1 ; 
Gathers, Bob, 9-8-0-0 ; Cathey, Gene, 11-20-1-1 ; Caudill, Gary 
A., 1-5-2-0 : Center, Marion S., 0-1-0-1 ; Chambers, Bill, 0-5-0-0 ; 
Chambers, William Virgil, 0-11-9-1; Chandler, J. Dan, 0-1-0-0; 
Chappell, Joe, 6-11-6-3 ; Chattin, Charles, 20-17-6-2 ; Chumbler, 
W. W., 8-20-2-1 : Clark, Owen B., 0-1-1-0 ; Clarkston, Glenn, 
0-1-1-0; Coffey, Kenneth B., 3-24-6-3; Cohen, Robert S., 2-3- 
0-0; Cole Harold, 1-0-0-0; Coleman, L. J. "Duke" Jr., 14-15-3-3: 
Colgan, Donald L., 4-5-1-0 ; Collins, Bob, 1-2-0-0 ; Collins, Larry, 
1-6-1-0; Combs, Keith A., 10-10-2-0; Combs, Travis, 10-4-0-0; 
Combs, William E., Jr., 10-9-1-0 ; Conley, George D., 23-6-1-0 ; 
Conley. Ted Lynn, 6-19-2-0 ; Conley, Tom W., 0-0-1-0 ; Conn, 
Hershel, 4-1-2-0; Cooke, George W., 18-25-4-0; Cooper, Hew- 
lett, 1-4-0-0 ; Cooper, John, 0-5-2-0 ; Cooper, John Wellington, 
10-6-0-0 ; Cooper, Warren, 35-9-1-0 ; Cossey, James Zelner, 
0-1-5-1 ; Covington, Richard G., 3-4-3-0 ; Cox, Charlels Glenn, 
3-7-0-0 ; Cox, Ralph, 0-3-0-0, Cox, Rufus A., 0-12-2-0 ; Cox, 
William J., 4-9-1-0 : Coyle, Ernest T., 1-0-0-0 ; Craft, Bill, 
42-27-1-1 ; Craig, John C, 4-11-1-2 ; Grain, Donald J., 3-7-1-1 ; 
Crase, Arvil, 0-0-0-1 : Crawford, Donald Ray, 0-8-1-0 ; Creech, 
Robert C, 0-1-1-1 ; Creekmore, Ken, 4-21-10-3 ; Cropper, Wil- 
liam C, 0-3-1-0 ; Crostwaite. John S., Jr., 34-10-0-0 ; Crutcher. 
James W., 22-21-5-5: Gulp. Willard E.. 1-4-0-0; Cullivan. Jim 
3-0-0-0: Cummins, Albert B., 5-6-3-0; Cunningham, Julian E.. 
2-17-2-1 ; Current, Ellis Ray, 0-10-8-2. 

Dalton, Ray H., 3-8-1-0 ; Dame, L. J., 2-30-6-3 ; Damico, 
Ernie, 1-0-0-0 ; Danner, James, 0-1-1-0 ; Daugherty, Elwood, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Atherton 



Durrett 



Waggener 



Ludlow 



Bellevue 



Henderson 



TENNIS DOUBLES— GIRLS 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



Atherton 
6-0: 6-2 



Franklin Co. 


Franklin Co. 




6-2; 6-4 


Manual 





Waggener 
6-0; 6-0 



Henderson 
6-1; 6-0 



FINALS 



Atherton 
6-0; 6-1 



Waggener 
6-4; 6-4 



Atherton 
6-4; 4-6; 6-4 



0-3-4-3: Daum. Charles A., l-S-2-0 ; Davenport, Robert B., 
2-14-2-n : Davidson, Danny J.. 1-1-0-0 : Davis. Bunny, 4-10-1-1 ; 
Davis, Donald. 16-22-1-0; Davis, Dwight R., Jr.. 9-12-7-2; 
Davis. Ralph, 8-9-0-0 ; Davis. Webster Curtis, 0-0-2-0 ; Dawson, 
Ray. e-1-0-1 ; Deaton, Charles, Jr., 5-11-3-1 ; DeMoisey, Fox. 

Murphy 



Billy L., 8-5- 
B.. 12-10-1-0; 
«., 7-10-4-0; 
Dodson, Ken- 



13-32-3-11 : DeMoisey. Truett R.. 7-33-4-1 , „^„.. 
M.. 8-13-1-1 ; Dennedy. T. Robert, 0-1-0-0 ; Denn' 
1-1 ; Derrick, Charles A., 0-3-1-0 : DeVary, Williai 
Dieterle, Owen M. 1-0-0-0 : DiMuzio, Robert 
Dixie. C. P., 3-3-1-2 : Dixon. Kenneth, 0-2-0-0 

neth, 4-6-2-0 ; Dorsey, James, 3-9-2-0 : Dotson, Joh.. „., . , 

Dotson. W. S.. 1-10-0-1 : Dowdy, Donald, 2-2-1-0 ; Drake. Rich- 
ard •'Dick", 10-27-7-2; Draugh, Bartram, 0-7-0-0; Driskell, 
Earl, Jr.. 2-15-8-2 : Duerson, Guy K., Jr., 4-2-1-0 ; Duerson, 
William Robert, 4-5-0-0 ; Duff, Birchell, 2-7-1-1 ; Dunaway, 
Heber, 0-4-4-3 ; Duncan, Earl S., 1-4-0-0 ; Duncan, James H,, 
0-3-0-0: Durkin, Jack, 26-23-3-7. 

Early, G. Robert, 0-0-1-0; Edelen, Ben R., 11-16-4-0; 
Edmiston. RajTnond Lee. 0-2-1-0 : Edwards, A. Donald, 3-4-1-1 ; 
Edwards, Hubert, 0-4-4-0 : Edwards, Owen D., 0-4-0-0 ; Elder, 
Robert J.. 6-17-3-0 : Eldridge, James R., 6-14-4-2 : Elkins R. 
Percy, 4-3-3-4; Elliott, Carroll L.. 5-15-4-0: Ellis, Johnny, 
0-1-0-0 : Elmore, Jimmy A.. 2-16-3-0 : Elovitz, Carl, 0-5-0-0 ; 
Elrod, William T., 11-11-2-0; Embrv, Dr. Chalmer P.. 2-1-0-0; 
Ensslin. Charles W., 2-5-1-0: Evans. James. 0-2-1-0; Everman, 
William J., 0-0-0-2. 

Fairchild, Gene P., 5-23-1-0; Falls, Harold B., 1-6-1-0; 
Fannin, Benny J., 1-1-0-2; Farmer, John Clay "Jack", 0-4-0-0; 
Farmer, Ralph. 3-10-7-0 : Farmer. Russell C, 4-4-1-0 ; Feher, 
A. J.. 4-1-n-O : Feix. Albert J.. 17-12-3-4 ; Feix, Jimmie, 42-40- 
4-1 ; Ferrell, Doc. 52-21-2-1 : Fields, Joe D.. 2-14-14-2 ; Fise, 
Charles Raymond, 2-6-2-2 ; Fisher, Larry J., 1-4-0-0 ; Flagg, 
Robert A., 1-3-1-0: Flaugher, Allen, 0-3-0-0: Fleenor, Francis 
J.. 2-20-2-2 : Flynn, Bobby. 29-35-6-1 : Foster. Berryman E.. 
0-12-0-0: Foster. William R. "Bob", 12-33-3-4: Fraley, Bill, 
3-15-2-2: Francis, Wendell Y.. 1-4-2-1: Frasure. Lois E., 
2-1-0-0 ; Freese, Oliver T., 2-7-2-0 : Fritz. Sherman, 14-26-10-5 ; 
Fuelling, Walter F.. 0-0-0-1 ; Fugate. E. Hugh, 9-14-2-1 ; Fuller, 
John R., 2-12-0-1 ; Fuson, Shelvie, 9-5-2-0. 

Gabbard. John B., 0-2-2-0 ; Gaither, Gene, 4-18-2-1 ; Gard- 
ner. Howard, 9-30-7-1 ; Gary, Robert O., 9-8-2-0 : Cast, Joseph 
H., 0-1-2-1 : Gerding, Jim, 0-4-1-1 ; Gettler, John F.. 3-15-5-2 ; 
Gibson. Fred W., 2-10-3-0; Gilbert, Gerald L., 9-16-8-2; Giles, 
J. W.. 1-8-1-0; Gillespie. Robert C. 7-11-2-0: Giordano. Al, 
17-15-8-1 : Gipson. Jimmy. 0-0-0-1 ; Glaysbrook. James E.. 0-0- 
3-0 : Gleason. George T.. 1-6-4-3 : Gleason. William 0-2-2-1 ; 
Godbey, Truman, 1-1-1-0; Goff, Reathel, 11-40-6-1; Goff. Rich- 
ard, 0-0-0-1 : Goetz, Larry, 0-0-1-0 : Coins, Herman, 0-6-0-1 ; 
Golden. Billy Joe. 53-24-4-1: Golden, Leonard T.. 0-2-0-0; 
m, 4-21-2-2: Goodin. Charles L.. 2-7-4-0; Goodin, 
-,.. 6-5-1-0; Goranflo. R. E.. 2-23-9-4; Gose. James, 
Gour. Robert A.. 9-26-3-3 ; Gourley, Harold E.. 1-12- 
Charles K., 8-7-5-0; Grace, Hickory E., Jr., 10-12- 
n, James E.. 3-0-0-1 : Gray. Raymond. 5-27-5-3 ; 
Bobby. 0-2-0-0; Green. Walter. 25-16-2-0; Green, 
Jerry, 0-1-1-0 ; Greer, Bobby G., 0-1-1-1 ; Greer, Thomas. 5-5- 
4-1 ; Griffith. Daryel. 3-1-0-1 ; Grigsby. Pete. Jr., 3-1-1-0 ; 



Goley 
Shirley G. 
0-1-0-0 : G 
4-0; Grace 
1-0 ; Grab 
Greathou; 



W., 



. 3-8-1-1; 

Grooms. Randall D., 7-9-1-1 ; Grooms, 
Glendal, 2-2-1-0; Gustafson, Al "Gus" 



Jr., 
Jesse R., 4-13-1-1 ; 
Roger, 5-0-0-1 ; Groves, 
Jr., 26-21-6-3. 



Hadden. Newell 

31-34-4-0 : Hagedorn, 

Hale, John, 0-4-1-0 ; 

Jr., 0-0-0-2 ; Hammoi 

2-9-1-0: Hancock, 



P.. Jr., 14-12-3-1 : Hagan, Joseph "Red". 
Thomas, 2-20-4-1 ; Hale, Don C, 8-16-0-0 ; 
Hall, C. E.. Jr., 0-2-0-0: Hall, Monroe, 
id. William, 0-4-0-0: Hampton, Darrell C, 
lackie R.. 0-8-2-2; Hardin, Ben W.. 0-1-1-0; 



Hardin. Jack H., 2-4-0-0; Hargis, Bobby S., 8-32-3-3; Harmon. 
Hayes R.. 0-23-5-3 : Harper, Robie, Jr.. 1-4-0-0 ; Harrell. 
Bill D., 39-10-0-1 ; Harris, Charles, 0-3-0-0 ; Harris, Jack D., 
14-14-6-0 : Harris, Jerry Lee, 1-2-0-0 ; Harris, Joe, 1-9-3-0 ; 
Harvey. Bennie, 0-7-0-0 ; Hatfield, Cecil E., 1-1-0-0 ; Hatter, 
Jack, 3-12-3-0 : Hayes, Adrian, 0-5-0-0 ; Hayes, Douglas J.. 
3-10-3-1; Hayden. Samuel J., 4-11-4-0; Haynes, John. 6-15-6-0; 
Hayes. Richard. 0-0-1-0 ; Head. Elmo C. 2-4-0-0 : Heldman, Dr. 
John. Jr.. 2-0-0-0 : Hendon, L. J.. 0-4-0-2 : Henson. Tony L.. 
13-24-2-1 ; Hertzberger, Robert H., 0-4-0-0 : Hewitt, R. T., 
7-10-6-2 : Hewling, Franklin C, 0-10-2-1 ; Hewling, Richard, 
1-17-8-12 ; Hicks. Floyd E., 0-1-0-2 ; Hightower, Kenneth, 2-4- 
1-0: Hill, Earl F.. 1-0-0-0; Hill, Jimmie, 0-3-2-0; Hinkle, 
Melvin Burns, 1-5-0-0; Hiten, John W., 7-9-2-0; Hitt, Billy D.. 
0-:!-l-2 : Hobbs, Charles V., 6-14-2-0 ; Hobby, Bill, 2-15-3-0 ; 
Hodge, Fred, 3-19-8-1 : Hodges, Holbert, 2-2-1-1 ; Hoferer, 
Louis R.. 4-9-3-1 ; Hofstetter, Joe, 0-4-0-1 ; Hoggard, Robert 
L., 0-4-2-0 : Holbrook, Arthur. 0-10-4-1 ; Holcomb. Joe, 0-1-2-1 ; 
Holeman, Bill R., 1-2-0-1 ; Holmes, Mike, 8-6-0-0 : Holt, Robert 
E.. 4-11-2-0 ; Holtzclaw. James Roby. 0-6-0-0 : Hook, Burnley 
B.. 2-13-0-0 : Hooks, Robert H., 9-15-6-4 ; Hoopei-, Edwin. 0-1-0-0 ; 
Horton, John B., 4-24-3-0 : Howard, Carl, 3-10-0-0 ; Howard, 
Henry D., 0-2-4-0 : Hudson. Oscar, 1-1-0-0 : Huiet, Fred 
"Whitey", 16-16-1-1 : Hughes. Charles. 65-30-0-1 : Hummer. 
Irby. 2-20-4-0 : Hunley, Neil P., 6-9-3-1 : Hunter, Thurman, 
2-1-0-0 ; Hurley, Robert, 0-2-0-1 : Hurst, David C, 6-2-2-0 : 
Hurst. Donald, 0-5-1-1 : Hutchens, Jim, 3-2-0-2 : Hutchinson, 
Jack. 4-6-0-1 ; Huter. James J.. 20-27-4-0 ; Hyatt, Robert L., 
18-24-7-0 : Hyland, Frank D., 0-1-0-1. 

Inman, Briscoe, 28-17-0-0 ; Irwin, Charles R., 24-25-2-0 ; 
Ison, Glennon B., 2-7-1-0. 



son. Charl. 

Kean, 9-1.5. 

0-4-1-0 : Joh 

Johnsc 

Johnsc 

Jones. 

Jones, 



Gene, 2-3-1-0 : 



John 
,, Willi; 
Carson 



Willia 
0-6-0-0 : Jenkins, James 
Jennings, Joe, 4-11-1-0 
1, Frank, 2-14-3-3; John: 
Luther, 0-1-0-0 : Johns 
4-19-7-1 : . 



1-14-1-5; 
seph, 0-2-1-1 ; Jone 
5-25-5-3 : Jordan, 
funker, Edwin C, 
orris W., 0-0-1-1. 



n v., 2-16-3-0 ; Jeffer- 

D., 38-42-3-0 : Jenkins, 

Jewell, Bobbv Owen, 

3n, James M., 0-1-1-0; 

nson, Walter, 33-15-2-0 ; 

Jones. Boyer. 4-13-1-0; 

Jones. Charles Junior, 3-6-2-0; 

Paul, 0-1-0-0 : Jordan, Arthur 

:en, 17-25-2-0 : Joyce, Clayton, 

3-2-2-0; Justice, Billy, 0-1-0-0; 



Kazee, Bill W.. 5-4-1-0 ; Keeton, C. E. "Buck", 1-7-0-0 ; 
Kercher, Norman L., 0-1-1-0; Kessler. Robert H., 0-1-0-0; Key, 
Calvin, 2-6-0-0: Kiefer, Steve D.. 1-2-0-0: Kidd, Roy. 2-16-2-2; 
Kimmei. Jerry. 19-31-2-0 : King. Allen. 2-2-0-0 ; King, Bob, 
6-21-4-3 : King, E. Lawson, 4-10-6-0 : King, James A., 14-40- 
8-6 ; King, John J.. Jr., 3-5-3-0 ; King, Russell. 1-7-0-0 ; Kinman, 
Joe T.. 14-36-6-5 ; Knight. Bill, 23-14-4-0 ; Kremer, Joseph A., 
2-16-7-1 : Kuhl. Lawrence, 0-1-0-0 : Kuhl, Terry W.. 0-2-0-0 



Lambert, Irvin, 0-0-1-0 ; Lambert, Kenneth 
Lance. Walter, 21-40-3-1 ; Landolt, Gene, 22-22-6-1 
0-0-0-3: Lankert, Norman E., 3-1-1-0; Lashbrook 
9-2 ; Lawrence, Alvin Lee, 0-1-0-1 ; Law 
Lay. William B., 2-4-0-1 ; Lazarus, Rl 
Leadingham. Jesse F., 7-1-2-2; Leathers, 
Lee, Robert L., 12-23-7-1 ; Lee, Will 



L., 2-2-1-0 ; 

Lane, Jack, 

Gene. 3-21- 

Leland. 6-6-1-1 ; 

Price. 26-27-4-1 ; 

C. Jr.. 2-2-1-2; 

3-3-2-0; LeQu 



28-13-1-0; Levan. T. F.. 1-14-13-1; Lewis. Howard. 
0-3-0-0 : Lewis. Milus G.. 1-0-0-1 ; Little, Ronnie. 0-1-0-0 ; 
Littral. James W.. 0-5-2-1 ; Logsdon. David L.. 0-8-0-1 ; Logue. 
Ronald Gene. 0-4-0-2 : Long. Bill. 7-25-5-1 ; Longenecker, 
David M.. 6-18-14-2: Longo. Richard. 1-4-1-0; Looney. Dick, 
20-11-0-1: Loudy. Kenneth. 1-11-1-1; Lowe. Eugene, 9-14-3-1; 
Lucas, Gene T., 34-19-2-0; Lusby, George, 0-2-0-0; Lyons, 
Charles S., 0-11-1-2. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Nine 



McAnelly. David F.. 4-16-2-0; McBride, Donald R., 5-10-2-0; 
McBride, Kenneth. 5-20-5-3; McCargo, Frank, 3-6-0-0; Mc- 
Claskey. Booker, 1-10-4-1 ; McClellan. Amos E., 1-2-0-1 ; Mc- 
Clellan Leonard B., 10-24-12-0 ; MeCord, Coleman, 1-9-2-0 : Mc- 
Cowan Connell. 3-9-2-0 ; McCoy, Hayse, 1-6-1-0 : McCoy, Larry 
0-1-0-1 '; McDonald. Charles, 1-0-0-0; McFall, Gene G. 0-1-2-0; 
McGehee, Gordon K., 2-3-0-0 ; McGhee, Jack, 0-0-1-2 ; McGlasson, 
Galen. 0-5-5-2 ; McGlone. Maurice B.. 1-3-0-1 ; McGuffey. Harold 
B 3-1-0-0 ; McHenrv. Louis P., 6-14-1-1 ; McLeod, Robert N., 
11-8-1-1 ; McMillin, Larry L., 4-7-2-1 ; McMullan, Cecil E., 4-9. 
4-2 ; McPike, Ray S.. 1-6-4-2 ; McQuilling, Gerald. 0-1-1-0. 

Mack, Joel C, 1-7-1-9 ; Macon, Alan L., 4-12-0-3 ; Maddox, 
Donald, 0-0-2-0 ; Mahan, Carle "Buddy", 23-12-7-3 ; Maines, 
George, 5-19-5-0; Malone. Donald R., 2-3-1-0; Marble. Luke. 
0-3-1-0 ; Martin. Charlie. 0-1-0-0 ; Mason. Gene A., 0-1-0-1 ; 
Massev. Douglas L., 4-7-3-0 ; Mattingly, Bernard C. 1-0-0-0 ; 
May. E. B.. Jr.. 22-24-5-8 ; Mayes. Edward. 9-12-2-2 ; Mayo. 
Henrv L.. Jr., 2-3-0-0 ; Mays. Ralph J.. 19-7-3-2 ; Mazzo. Al 
"Babe". 1-5-0-0; Meade. Foster "Sid", 12-9-2-2; Meadows, 
Marvin, 15-37-2-0 ; Meeks. Jack. 7-10-5-2 ; Meiman. William 
1-9-3-1 ; Melmige. Jim. 0-2-0-0 ; Meredith. Denny E., Jr. 1-10-1-1 ; 
Metcalfe, Earl L., 28-21-5-5 ; Meyer. Bud. 4-10-0-1 ; Middleton, 
Johnny. 1-0-0-0 ; Miles, Francis, 0-10-1-1 ; Miles, Joseph D., 
0-6-2-0 ; Miley. Robert L. 0-3-0-0 ; Miller, Bob, 11-19-4-1 ; Miller, 
Ferrell. 15-19-1-1 ; Miller. Jack. 3-4-2-0 ; Miller. Rex J., 3-1-0-0 ; 
Miller. Claude. O., 0-2-0-0 ; Miller. Roy J., 3-6-1-0 ; Miller, 
Roy L.. 9-23-12-2 ; Millerhaus, Bill, 0-0-1-0 ; Minton, Eugene 
H. 2.-0-0-0 ; Miracle. Ed. 9-4-1-0 ; Mobley. Tony, 0-1-0-0 ; Moll, 
Francis B., 1-4-0-1 ; Moore, Ballard J,. 1-1-2-0 ; Moore. James 
E., 0-1-3-2 ; Moore. Pete, 8-14-0-0 ; Moore, Robert W.. Jr., 
2-12-3-0 ; Monahan, Ed, 0-8-0-2 ; Moser, Emerson, 2-13-7-1 ; 
Moser, Rudy Clay, 7-13-9-1 ; Mouser. H. D., 5-15-3-0 ; Mudd, 
Ed, 15-16-7-3 ; Mulligan, J. T., 2-3-1-0 ; Mullins, B. E.. 3-7-3-0 ; 
Mullins, Ben H., 0-1-1-0 ; Murphy, Donald J., 0-2-0-0 ; Murrell, 
Allen L., 5-22-6-3 ; Mussman, Ralph, 20-14-3-4 ; Myers, 
Charles N., 4-4-2-1 ; Myers, Edward B., 1-3-3-0. 

Nail, Samuel R., 6-14-1-0; Nantz, Wilburn, 1-7-5-0; Nau, 
Bill, 17-7-2-0 ; Neal, Gene. 27-20-3-2 ; Neal, Marion, 0-2-1-0 ; 
Nelson, William O., 0-0-1-0 ; Nevirman, Bill, 1-7-0-0 ; Newsom, 
Lawrence, 0-6-1-0 ; Newsom, Marley, 5-9-4-3 : Newsome, Forest, 
3-0-0-1; Newton, C. M., 23-18-1-0; Newton, Reason G.. 5-11-0-1; 
Nie, Allen. 6-7-1-1 ; Nixon, James W.. 7-20-3-0 ; Noble. Char- 
les B.. 11-24-5-0 ; Noble, Leonard, 6-16-12-0 ; Noel, George E., 
0-1-0-0 ; Noel. Paul W., 16-11-0-2 ; Noel, Robert A.. 3-0-0-0 ; 
Nord, Ed, 31-31-1-0 ;. 

O'Connell, James M., 1-1-0-0; O'Daniel, Jeff, 0-2-0-0; Odle, 
Thurman, 8-12-3-1 ; Oldham, Charles M., 0-2-1-1 ; Oldham, 
John H.. 4-6-3-0 ; Omer. Billy W., 9-20-4-1 ; O'Nan, Eugene, 
6-13-5-3 ; Overly, William H., 5-2-1-0. 

Pack, James Warren, 0-1-1-0 ; Padgett, R. K.. 4-11-4-0 ; 
Parker, Billy E., 29-25-0-0 ; Park, J. M., 5-18-7-4 ; Parrott, 
Lanny L., 6-8-0-0 ; Pate, Freddy, 0-1-2-0 ; Patrick, Ralph, 4-4-0-0 ; 
Patterson, Clem, 0-4-2-0 : Payne, Gayle H., 11-8-7-2 ; Pearson, 
Bobby Neal, 0-16-10-2; Peay, Curtis E., 10-20-5-3; Peden. Har- 
lan C. 8-5-3-3 ; Peeno, Harry R., 0-14-2-2 ; Penrod. Joe B., 
12-17-7-3 ; Pergrem, Nard, 23-8-0-0 ; Perkins, William E.. 
1-2-3-0 ; Perry, George B., 3-6-0-0 ; Perry. James E.. 2-9-8-4 ; 
Petett. Frank M.. 1-0-0-0 ; Phelps. Dale. 0-2-5-1 ; Phelps. Ralph 
Ray. 1-3-0-0; Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", 22-15-7-1; Pickens, Jim, 
0-0-1-0 ; Pierce. Ray. 1-1-2-0 ; Pike. Robert F.. 1-7-2-0 ; Poe, 
Thomas E., 1-3-2-0 ; Pollston, Billy D., 1-1-1-0 ; Powell, Logan, 
6-9-2-3 ; Preece, Boyce C 0-2-0-0 ; Preston, Woodrow, 0-1-0-0 ; 
Price, James E.. 5-14-3-0 ; Price. Jimmy. 1-2-2-0 ; Prior. Lowell 
F.. 0-2-1-0 ; Pruitt, Donald Wayne, 0-3-1-0 ; Pursifull. Cleophus, 
27-19-0-3. 

Quigg. Ben F., IV, 9-15-8-1 ; Quillen, John, 2-8-1-1. 

Rainey, Jimmy, 9-2-1-1 ; Rains, Richard, 0-4-1-0 ; Raisor, 
•J. T.. 1-4-0-0 ; Rail. Eugene, 6-15-9-1 ; Randolph. Don M., 
7-16-2-2 ; Rannell, Richard H.. 0-5-3-0 ; Rapp. William. 1-2-0-0 ; 
Ray, Malcolm, 0-1-1-1 ; Reagan, Johnny L.. 5-2-1-0 ; Redman. 
Malvern G.. 2-8-1-1 ; Reece, Larry H., 0-2-3-0 ; Reece. Ralph, 
0-1-0-0 ; Reed, Charles R., 6-14-1-0 ; Reed, Cliford D., 0-4-2-1 ; 
Reed, Ed, 0-1-0-1 ; Reed, Gordon "Moe", 5-20-6-2 ; Reinhardt, 
Myron S., 12-32-2-1 ; Renfro, John E., 11-9-6-2 ; Reschar. John 
v.. 0-6-0-1 ; Rexroat, Jerry Lawrence, 14-19-6-2 ; Richards, Jim 
S., 35-33-5-4 ; Richardson. Charles E., 3-22-4-1 ; Richadrson, 
Joe M.. 9-21-2-2 ; Rickard. Bob. 1-1-2-0 ; Ricketts. Claude 0., 
17-24-7-3 ; Rickman. Murrel, 0-12-4-2 ; Riffe. James. 0-15-0-0 ; 
RigBs. Morgan E.. 1-1-0-2 ; Riggs. William T.. 8-7-0-0 ; Ring. 
William H.. 2-0-0-0; Ritter. Goebel. 27-5-1-0: Roach. Earl 
Wilton. 3-11-3-2; Roark, Paul G.. 0-0-4-1; Roberts. Earl C. 
0-4-3-2 ; Roberts, Donald G., 0-9-2-1 ; Roberts. Earl Ray. 4-14- 
7-3 ; Roby. .Joseph L.. 8-32-3-1 ; Rocke. James M.. 5-19-3-1 ; 
Rodgers, David, 3-5-0-0 ; Roeckers, Bernard, 2-3-0-0 : Rogers, 
Howard, 6-2-0-0 ; Roller, Otis, 5-10-3-3 : Rolph Harold J.. 6-9- 
3-0 ; Rose. Lee H., 9-4-3-0 ; Rose, Wallace C. 15-15-1-1 ; Rosen- 
baum. Robert L., 4-10-3-1 ; Rothfuss, Richard. 0-12-1-1 ; Rouse, 
Clyde L., 6-18-5-3 ; Rubarts, Leland G., 6-22-3-0 ; Ruggiero, 
Ralph, 4-5-1-0 ; Runyon. To-nmy Dean. 2-2-0-3 ; Rush. Ralph 
R.. 1-6-1-1 ; R-Jssell. Allen W.. 15-16-2-1 ; Russell, Eugene 
-Eudy", 0-7-1-1 ; Russell. Joe, 17-38-7-3. 

St. Clair, Robert L.. Jr.. 5-24-4-0 ; Sallee. Charles M., 
1-4-1-0 ; Salyers, Gobel, 1-1-2-0 ; Samples, Bernard M., 0-4-2-0 ; 
Samples, Gilbert 1-0-0-1 ; Sanders, Mel, 16-25-8-3 ; Baylor, 
Deward. 1-0-0-0 ; Schad. James. 3-1-0-0 ; Schlich, Paul, 13-21- 
9-2; Schnebelt, Carl R., 0-0-2-1; Scott, Charles E.. 0-5-1-0; 
Scott. Emmanuel H., 0-1-0-0 ; Scale, John D., 2-2-4-1 ; Seelye, 
Arthur L., 1-9-1-0 ; Selvy, Curt, 14-23-2-2 ; Settle, Roy G., 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS' TENNIS 




Left to Right): Victor Williams: Gail LeLozier (Shaw- 
nee), state singles champion: Kate Lowe and Cissy Gossman 
(Atherton), state doubles championship team. 

24-24-2-1 ; Sexton, Steven C, 0-1-0-0 ; Sexton, William L., 
3-4-0-0 ; Shackleford, Roscoe, 10-8-3-0 ; Shaw, Donald Lee, 
5-10-2-2; Shaw, Earl, 15-11-1-1; Shirley, Henry, 0-0-1-0; Shivley, 
Howard, Jr., 1-9-4-1 ; Shope, Lowell Marting, 0-1-0-0 ; Show, 
alter, John, 9-2-0-0 ; Shuck. Thomas G., 1-12-3-1 ; Siler, Clar- 
ence, M. 2-10-1-1 ; Simms, Sylvester. 2-3-0-0 ; Simons. Joe A., 
2-1-0-0 ; Simpson. Fred. 6-7-2-1 ; Singleton. Vesper. 4-12-7-1 ; 
Slucher, Kenneth W., 0-0-1-0 ; Small, Rex, 4-10-5-1 ; Small, 
William W. "Bill", 10-44-8-0 ; Smith. Aubrey. 3-5-0-0 ; Smith, 
David W.. 6-15-7-4; Smith. Edgar J.. 3-26-3-3; Smith. Wayne 
N.. 11-4-2-0 ; Smith. Willard N., 11-7-5-0 ; Smithson. Richard 
D., 9-19-10-0; Snowden, Ken, 0-4-0-0; Solomon, Jim, 7-26-10-4; 
Sosh, LaRue, 17-6-2-0 ; Sosh, Nelson, 16-5-2-0 ; South, William 
F.. 1-5-2-2; Spaulding, Stan. 4-3-0-0; Spencer, Irvin. 12-24-2-0; 
Stamoer, Paul. 3-1-2-0 ; Stamper. Robert L.. 0-4-1-0 ; Stanfill, 
Robert S., 1-8-3-0 ; Steely. Stanley. 1-10-3-0 ; Steenken. William 
R., 6-7-0-1 ; Steinke. Donald F.. 2-0-1-0 ; Stephens. Kenneth H., 
4-19-8-6; Stephenson. Harry. 18-20-1-0; Stewart. Herbert T., 
4-15-4-1; Stidham, Jennis, 1-0-0-0; Stidhan, Juder. Jr., 0-2-0-0; 
Stinson. Charles L.. 3-4-3-0: Stone. Robert E.. 13-3-fi-l: Stone, 
Sidney P., 0-1-0-0 ; Story, Ray, 0-2-0-3 ; Strange, William L., 
3-13-5-0 ; Strong, Arnett, 40-22-4-1 ; S'.ull, Woodson, 0-8-1-1 ; 
Sturgill, Barkley J., 4-8-3-0 ; Stutler. John P.. 0-2-0-1 ; Stutton, 
Ronnie N.. 0-3-0-0 ; Sullivan. Don C. 25-34-5-7 ; Sumner, Harold 
Carl, 0-2-0-0 ; Swim, Gerald, 5-3-0-0 ; Swope, William. 1-7-1-0. 

Tarlton, Thomas 0.. 0-1-0-0 ; Taylor, Bob, 10-31-4-6 ; Tay- 
lor, Carl Ray, 0-0-1-0 ; Taylor. Dennis H.. 3-6-1-4 ; Taylor. Ed, 
14-33-3-8 ; Taylor. Hal. 4-23-3-3 ; Taylor, James R., 1-13-4-0 ; 
Taylor, Roger E.. 2-17-0-0 ; Thoma. M. L. 10-16-2-0 ; Thompson, 
Jack. 31-37-7-1 ; Thompson. Ralph. 0-2-0-0 ; Thompson. Thomas 
A.. 1-0-0-1; Thompson. Tommy. 0-2-0-2; Tipton, Asa I., 0-5-5-0; 
Tolle, Lewis D., 0-1-0-0 : Todd, Lonnie H., 0-0-1-0 ; Torian, 
Virgil. Jr., 5-9-0-1 : Toy, Eddie N.. 1-2-0-0 : Trivette. John 
Bill. 0-0-1-0 ; Troutman. Doyle, 0-4-0-0 ; Tuck. Ochell, 24-16-3-1 ; 
Tucker Neal R., 0-16-4-2 ; Turner, Aaron P., 0-5-4-4 : Turner, 
Bruce, 2-2-1-0. 

Vance. Earl G.. 8-8-1-0 ; VanHoose. Edgar N.. 1-4-0-0 ; 
VanHoose. Jimmy Lee, 0-2-2-1 ; VanMeter, Kaye Done, 1-5-3-1 ; 
VanWinkle, Billy, 1-5-0-0 ; VanWinkle, Steve, 0-0-0-1 ; Van- 
Zant, Jim, 0-0-1-0 : Varble, William E.. 8-36-7-1 ; Varner. Ray 
9-13-2-2 ; Vaughn, Melvin, 0-1-1-0 ; Veseovi, Raymond B., 
5-2-0-1 : Vinciguerra, Philip, 1-0-1-0 ; Vinson, Ray T., 20-20-11-6 ; 
Vipperman. Albert, 1-1-0-1. 

Waide. Harry D., 3-6-0-0 : Walker, Paul R.. 9-20-3-1 : Wal- 
lace. James H.. 0-2-1-2 ; Wallen, Don. 6-10-3-2 : Wallen. Ed- 
gar. 0-1-0-0: Wallen. Howard W.. 11-2-3-1; Walls. Harry B., 
1-4-2-1 : Wanchic. Nicholas, 11-10-3-0 ; Ward, Jackie D., 2-7-3-0 ; 
Ward, Eddie D., 2-12-2-3 : Watson, Clifford L.. 0-2-1-0 ; Wearren, 
Wade H.. 4-7-2-0 ; Weathers. Charles. Jr.. 0-4-1-1 ; Weaver, 
B. H.. 14-18-3-0; Weaver. Ray. 0-5-0-0; Webb. Oren H.. 0-1-3-0; 
Webb. Lonard. 1-1-2-0 : Weber. John. 3-10-4-2 ; Weisbrodt. Paul 
E.. 14-25-1-1 ; Welch. John H.. 0-1-2-1 : Welch. Ralph W., 
10-16-7-4; Wells. Milford. 32-i:i-3-0; Wendel. Jerrv. 0-1-0-0; 
Wenz. Marvin L.. 0-1-0-0 : Wesche. James A.. 1-5-3-0 ; Wester, 
field, Glenn, 0-17-4-2; Whalen. William Clinton. 3-7-1-0; 
Whipple. Lloyd G., 5-1-0-0 ; White. David B.. 3-29-4-2 ; White, 
Harlie, Jr.. 2-2-0-0 ; White, James E., 3-1-1-0 : White. William 
Jason, 7-12-3-1 ; Whitfield, Robert B., Jr., 0-0-0-1 ; Whitham, 
Challenger. Jr.. 0-1-0-0 ; Wilcox. Edgel M.. 0-2-1-1 ; Will. Chuck, 
0-1-0-0 ; Willett. Arthur, "Bud". 2-3-2-1 ; Willey. Harold, 0-2-1-0 ; 
Williams, Bobby, 3-12-1-5; Williams, George W., 2-0-0-0; Wil- 
liams. James H.. 4-6-1-0 ; Williams. Reid V.. 2-2-0-0 ; Williams, 
Roger. 7-22-11-6; Williams. Tom M., Jr.. 23-18-4-2; Williams, 
Willie H., 1-3-1-0 ; Willis, Robert A.. 8-12-3-0 : Wilson, Jack 
R., 15-6-1-3 ; Wilson, H. G.. 1-3-2-0 : Winchester, Roy L., 42-32- 
1.1 ; Winfrey, Shelby, 45-20-5-1 ; Wingfield. Feix G.. 1-10.4-0 ; 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Wixtz. Howard A.. 4- 
31-21-3-2 : Wolf. J. F 
Wood. Harry Phillip, 



-li-O: Wise, Billy, 13-19-2-2; Wise, Jack, 
1-0-1-1 : Womack, William H., 1-1-1-1 
2-18-3-2 : Wood : Kenneth C, 0-1-6-3 



O.. 6-3-1-0 ; Wood^vard. Danny H.. 0-2-0-0 



Woodward. Durwood. 0-8-0-0 : 



B.My Joe. 3-23-3-0 : Wright. H. W.. Jr., 0-3-3-0 ; Wright, Paul, 
14-9-2-2 ; Wurtz. Emil, 0-0-1-0. 

Yancey. William T., 1-4-3-0: Yates, J. Virgil, 0-4-0-0; 
Yates, William D.. 1-11-6-4: Yeary, William H.. 5-5-3-1: 



Darrel. 0-5-3-0 : Wright, Ye 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship K. H. S. A. A 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1959-2960 



Alien County- 
Aln 



Alvaton 

Anderson 

AnnviUe Institute- 

Ashland 

Attacks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 

Auxier 

Bagdad 

Ballard Memorial— 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benha 



Benton, 
Be 



Betsy Layne 

Black Star 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Booker T. Washingto 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt County 

Breckinridge County— 

Breckinridge Tng 

B 



Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bryan Station- 
Buckeye 

Buckhorn 

Bu 



Burgin. 

Burns 

Bush- 



lide- 



Butle 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Calhoun 

Camargo 

Campbell County 

Campbellsburg 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson- 

Caneyville 

Carlisle County 

Carlisle 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 



Centertown 

Central 

Central City 

Chandler's Chapel- 

Charleaton 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay County 

Clay 

Clifty 

Clinton County 

College 

Communitjr 

Corbin 

Cordis 



2 
6 


53 
14 


7 


26 





64 





38 





41 





60 





31 





42 


3 


61 





51 





57 


2 


31 





29 


2 


55 





41 





45 


1 


48 


3 


24 





32 


1 


32 





35 





46 


1 


32 





45 


3 


29 


2 


30 


3 


45 





35 


1 


49 





30 





35 





31 


2 


29 





38 


2 


39 





31 


3 


35 





42 


3 


33 





43 


2 


50 





26 


1 


49 





23 


1 


48 


3 


48 


1 


60 


3 


36 





39 





42 


4 


31 


6 


30 


2 


51 





21 





39 


4 


26 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Eleven 



Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden County 

Cuba 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

De.ning 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs Memorial- 
Dixie Heights 



Dorton 

Dotson 

Douglass (Henderson) — 
Douglass (Lexington)-. 

Douglalss iMurray) 

Drakesboro 

DuBois 

Dunbar (Mayfeild) 

Dunbar (Morganfield). 

Dunham 

duPont Manual 

Durham 

Durrett 

Earlington 

East Benham 

Eastern 

East Main Street 

Edmonson County 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic- 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Estill County 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairdale 

Fairview 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Fern Creek 

Ferguson 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fordsville 

Forkland 

Ft. Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fultlon County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Georgetown 



Glendale , 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall 

Hanson 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel 

Hazel Green 

Hazel Green Academy. 

Heath 

Hellier 



COACH 


1 


OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 


1 




TEAM 








OFFICIALS 


















G 


K 


H 1 


E G 


b' 


p 


E 


U 


F 


f 


K 


G 


F 


IH 


1 


1 


67 


13 


1 


1 


67 


14 


6 


1 


61 


20 


1 


7 


1 





45 


9 








38 


14 


2 





39 


14 


1 1 


3 


4 


2 


39 


2 


2 


1 


29 


12 


4 





32 


10 


2 1 


fi 


4 


3 


41 


7 


1 





26 


12 


10 





36 


12 


1 1 


7 


2 





31 


11 








28 


13 


1 





29 


12 


1 1 


5 


5 


1 


52 


5 





1 


40 


14 


2 


1 


46 


10 


1 1 


11 


1 





28 


13 








22 


14 








22 


10 


3 1 


6 


S 


1 


45 


3 


1 





39 


8 


2 





39 


8 


1 


23 


1 


1 


25 


14 








24 


15 








26 


13 





2 








42 











37 


6 








38 


4 





10 








48 


9 







40 


14 


3 





46 


11 


1 


» 


4 


1 


48 


10 


i 





45 


13 


3 


1 


40 


16 


6 1 


27 


5 





h(t 


20 


2 





28 


38 


6 





29 


31 


10 


2 








32 


6 








30 


8 








29 


8 


1 


9 


1 





35 


9 





1 


26 


17 


2 





26 


18 


3 


2 


1 





26 


3 


3 





22 


7 


3 





28 


3 


1 1 


23 


3 


3 


53 


23 


1 





41 


33 


4 





46 


31 


1 1 


11 


4 


3 


36 


9 








22 


16 


1 





23 


15 


1 1 


3 








44 


3 








38 


8 


1 





37 


9 


1 1 


1 


1 





13 


1 


1 





10 


1 


4 





9 


4 


2 1 


12 








28 


16 








18 


20 


1 




21 


18 


3 


9 


(1 





20 


10 







16 


14 







19 


11 





Ifi 


(t 


2 


IS 


17 








11 


20 


1 




6 


24 


1 


12 


« 


1 


43 


■1 


1 





29 


11 


6 




34 


10 


5 1 


6 








13 


9 








12 


12 







16 


7 


1 1 


8 








16 


7 







14 


8 







11 


11 


1 


19 


(1 





19 


17 








15 


16 


4 




15 


18 


3 1 


12 


2 





25 


13 








23 


15 







22 


14 


2 


13 







41 


9 


1 




30 


16 


4 




36 


15 





8 







20 


10 


1 





19 


11 


1 




19 


12 





19 







25 


20 


1 





19 


2ft 


1 




15 


24 


6 


19 




2 


46 


17 


2 





46 


16 


2 




38 


18 




1 







12 


2 


2 





10 


3 


3 




9 


4 




13 







48 


6 








42 


10 


2 




42 


12 




8 


5 


3 


49 


7 








44 


9 


3 




46 


9 




10 







30 


10 


1 




27 


9 


2 




30 


7 


3 1 


2 







42 


3 







32 


11 


2 




43 


2 


1 


9 




2 


34 


8 


4 


3 


22 


18 


5 




29 


17 


3 1 


5 







40 


3 





« 


28 


12 


3 





36 


7 




13 




1 


25 


13 


1 


2 


17 


22 


1 




20 


16 


4 


9 







42 


4 








30 


15 


1 




30 


15 




17 







51 


14 


1 





31 


26 


8 




43 


19 




4 




1 


20 


4 


2 





21 


2 


3 




18 


3 




12 




1 


26 


13 







25 


14 







24 


12 




5 







17 


2 








12 


7 







12 


6 




14 




3 


44 


13 


1 


2 


34 


22 


3 




37 


18 




8 




2 


42 


4 


4 


4 


29 


17 


2 




31 


16 




11 







28 


12 


1 





18 


19 


4 




26 


16 




19 




1 


25 


16 


1 





22 


14 


6 




24 


11 




4 







36 


8 








31 


9 


2 




29 


9 




26 




2 


46 


10 





1 


36 


17 


3 




31 


15 




14 







47 


7 


3 




35 


16 


3 




36 


17 




15 







56 


14 








41 


19 


9 


2 


60 


20 




3 







34 


6 








26 


8 


3 




31 


5 




9 







34 


9 








34 


9 







36 


7 




6 


1 





30 


9 








25 


13 


1 




29 


9 




3 




2 


34 


3 


1 





29 


9 







33 


2 




9 




8 


45 


10 


2 





40 


10 


7 




37 


12 




6 







19 


9 


1 





13 


9 


6 




12 


9 




6 








36 


6 


2 




24 


19 


1 




28 


16 












24 


2 








25 


1 







25 


1 




11 




2 


33 


8 








26 


14 


1 




26 


16 




7 




1 


68 


3 


1 





51 


11 







50 


12 




4 







28 


1 








28 


8 


1 




27 


2 









2 


28 


5 








22 


7 


3 




23 


5 




7 


(1 





25 


7 








21 


12 


1 




22 


9 




10 


3 





36 


9 





1 


33 


10 


1 




28 


15 




3 




1 


28 


4 








24 


7 







27 


5 




11 




1 


22 


14 





1 


19 


16 


1 




21 


16 




14 


4 


1 


41 


12 








27 


22 


2 




29 


18 




8 


(1 





18 


8 







16 


11 







16 


9 




3 


(1 


1 


21 


3 





1 


22 


5 


7 




23 


4 




7 





4 


44 


3 








38 


4 







35 


5 




10 


II 


4 


25 


6 





1 


22 


» 


1 




23 


7 




9 


2 


2 


37 


7 







31 


13 


2 




36 


11 




11 


3 


5 


36 


6 







30 


H 







27 


10 




5 


1 





46 


3 







34 


11 


3 




37 


9 




10 








38 


9 







31 


16 


1 




34 


11 




9 








28 


8 







21 


14 


1 




26 


7 




4 


3 





52 


8 







48 


13 







60 


11 




7 


3 





49 


10 







43 


7 


3 




40 


13 




6 


2 


1 


28 


4 







21 


10 


1 




26 


7 




6 








17 


6 







10 


10 


3 




12 


10 




5 


5 


4 


26 


6 




1 


22 


7 


3 




24 


6 




10 


5 


3 


36 


6 




2 


27 


12 


3 




26 


16 




4 


n 


1 


49 


4 







44 


10 


1 




43 


10 




5 


(1 





64 


6 








66 


4 







58 


12 





5 


(I 





33 


5 








33 


6 







36 


4 





4 


3 


1 


42 


7 








37 


9 


2 




40 


9 





4 


1 


2 


31 


5 


1 





29 


5 


3 




32 


6 





2 


1 





29 


3 








28 


4 







29 


3 





7 


3 





29 


6 








23 


10 


1 




20 


10 


2 


14 


1 





26 


11 








21 


16 


1 




21 


16 





15 


1 





59 


12 








64 


15 


1 




52 


17 


2 


8 


4 





41 


8 








36 


7 


6 




36 


10 


3 


4 


2 





23 


8 








19 


10 


3 


3 


23 


9 


3 



Fage Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Henderson 

Henderson County. 
Henderson Settleme 

Henrj' Central 

Henry Clay 

Hickman County 

Highlands 

High Street 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holv Name 

Hopkinsville 

Hoi-se Branch-- 

Howevalley 

Hugrhes Kirk 

Huston ville 

Inez _ 

Irvine 



Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

J. M. Atherton 

Junction City 

J. W. Million 

Ky. Mili. Inst 

Kingdom Come 

Kirksey 

Knox Centra] 

Knott County 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

La Rue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

Lewisburg 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln ( Middlesboro) 

Lincoln (Paducahi 

Lincoln ( Stanford ) 

Lincoln Grant (Covingtont 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge). 



Livingston 

Livingston Central 

Lloyd Memorial 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day- 
Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lynn Grove 

Lynn vale 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 



Madison Central 

Madison-Model 

Madisonville 

Magoffin Baptist Inst.. 

Male 

Marrowbone 

Martin 

Ma 



Mayfteld 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Maytown 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial fHardyvillej— . 
Memorial (Waynesburg)- 
Mercer County ■ 



COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 1 








OFFICIALS 1 


G 


F 


p 


E G 


F P 1 


1 3 


4 


s 


46 


4 








1 3 


I 





30 


6 








1 3 


3 


2 


32 


2 


2 





1 16 


1 





33 


9 


1 





1 7 








33 


4 








1 7 


1 


2 


34 


7 


2 





1 18 


6 


1 


51 


18 


2 


1 


1 2 


2 





33 


5 








1 3 





1 


39 


2 


1 





1 1 


(1 





28 


3 








1 14 


2 





37 


15 


6 





1 24 


1 





59 


23 








1 14 


9 





32 


14 








1 12 


1 





52 


11 








1 IB 


1 





3B 


12 


1 





1 10 


2 


1 


41 


7 


3 





1 4 








88 


4 


1 


2 


1 12 


1 


2 


27 


5 





2 


1 1 








36 


5 








1 11 








39 


4 








1 7 


2 


7 


40 


7 








1 4 


1 





37 


3 








1 10 


1 


2 


31 


5 








1 13 








34 


10 








i 10 


2 


2 


33 


9 


1 





1 7 


3 


1 


38 


4 


1 





1 5 


1 





43 


4 








1 16 


3 


1 


26 


13 





2 


1 10 


6 


3 


30 


11 


2 





[ 2 








15 


2 








1 1 








1 


1 








1 2 








21 


3 


1 





1 9 


1 


1 


27 


13 


1 





1 5 


3 





40 


4 








1 9 





1 


25 


7 





1 


1 4 


(1 





29 


6 








1 4 


1 





33 


7 


1 





1 S 


8 


1 


32 


2 








1 7 


5 


I 


42 


7 


2 





1 6 


I 





31 


7 








1 7 


5 


2 


46 


4 


2 





1 16 





1 


38 


19 


1 





1 2 


(1 





27 


3 








1 9 


4 





32 


9 


1 





4 


2 


3 


46 


1 


2 





4 


1 





22 


6 








6 


2 





33 


5 








7 


1 





40 


14 








21 


4 


3 


32 


20 


4 


2 


6 


3 





47 


7 








4 


11 





14 


5 








1 


1 





19 


2 








11 


1 





13 


9 


1 





14 


1 





30 


4 


1 





8 


1 





38 


10 


1 





17 


2 





30 


17 


1 





9 


4 


4 


52 


5 








16 


1 


2 


49 


14 





1 


10 


2 


2 


29 


7 


1 





20 


4 


1 


59 


23 








12 


5 


1 


42 


10 


1 





1 


1 


1 


49 


3 








9 


?, 


2 


44 


9 








13 


9 


3 


30 


13 


1 


1 


3 


3 





25 


6 


1 


n 


16 


2 


2 


29 


21 








6 


3 


1 


33 


6 








19 


1 





43 


16 








8 


6 


1 


41 


5 





1 


10 


2 





25 


11 








16 


3 





41 


4 








14 


1 


3 


33 


8 


1 


3 


7 


2 


1 


66 


8 








2 


1 





34 


1 








15 








28 


25 








17 


3 


3 


28 


16 








9 








36 


7 








20 


2 


4 


29 


12 


2 





8 


B 


2 


48 


10 





1 


8 


3 





67 


6 


1 





5 


1 





67 





1 





8 


1 





12 


9 








18 


9 


3 


36 


12 


1 





10 


4 


2 


30 


12 








4 


1 





46 


2 








4 








12 


4 








11 


1 


1 


42 


10 








21 


2 





24 


19 








4 








61 


3 








1 


n 





27 


2 








6 


4 


2 


23 


8 


2 


1 


7 


1 





38 


10 








2 








61 


3 







1 


1 





37 


4 








16 


1 





42 


13 


2 





16 


2 





39 


11 


2 






39 


6 


29 


7 


24 


9 


22 


18 


33 


4 


32 


10 


46 


21 


32 


6 


39 


3 


22 


5 


22 


27 


51 


26 


24 


19 


36 


20 


28 


17 


37 


9 


34 


8 


23 


12 


35 


6 


34 


10 


3K 


1 


38 


2 


27 


9 


3(1 


14 


35 


8 


32 


2 


42 


5 


25 


13 


25 


15 


15 


1 


19 


5 


27 


10 


3H 


7 


19 


13 


33 


5 


3(1 


10 


19 


9 


3(1 


14 


27 
38 


9 
12 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Thirteen 



Menifee County 

Metcalfe County 

Mtddleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Millefsburg Military Inst.. 

Minerva 

Montgomery County 

Monticeilo 

Morgan County 

Moi"ganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Ve 



Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central. 
Mullins 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray College 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Marshall 

North Middletown 

North Warren 

O'dham County 

Oil Springs 

Old Ky. Home 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida Institute 

Orangeburg 

County 



Ov 



shore 



nsboro Catholic 

Owingsville 

Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paints ville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pendleton 

Perry ville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Pleasureville 

Powell County 

Poplar Creek 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Riney ville 

Riverview 

Rockhold 

Rosenwald { Bax'bour ville) 

Rosen wald (Harlan) 

Rosenwald (Lebanon) 

Rosenwald (Madisonville) 

Rosenwald-Dunbar (Nicholasville) 

Rosenwald (Providence) 

Rowan County 

Russell County 

Russell 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha Acad. 

St. Agnes 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Benedict 

St. Camillus Acad. 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph 

St, Joseph Prep. 

St. Mary 

St. Mary's Acad 

St. Patrick's 

St. Thomas 





COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 1 










OFFICIALS 




K 


G 


h' 


P 


E G 


F 


p 


Z1 


24 


2 





21 


22 


2 





85 


10 


4 





37 


12 








«1 


10 


1 


2 


27 


10 








SK 


6 


1 


1 


44 


1 








24 


10 


7 


8 


27 


13 


1 





HH 


8 


4 


2 


35 


7 


4 





2(i 


19 


4 





27 


21 


1 





•M\ 


11 








38 


11 


1 





(57 


4 


2 





65 


8 








■M 


9 


8 


2 


36 


12 


4 


1 


44 


11 


8 





39 


15 


2 





4X 


9 


1 




49 


7 


2 





4fi 


6 







39 


7 








«9 


12 


4 




44 


10 


2 


1 


1(15 


6 


1 




76 


7 








87 


16 


(1 




60 


3 








25 


9 


3 




34 


X 


4 





2(1 


10 







27 


10 








IH 


12 


4 




29 


7 








88 


12 


4 




43 


9 








41 


9 


5 




47 


X 


1 





22 


17 


1 




30 


9 


1 





4fi 


27 







47 


16 


1 





K8 


11 


4 


2 


51 


11 


1 


1 


48 


12 


6 


8 


55 


8 


1 





87 


8 





(1 


35 


10 








47 


12 








47 


10 








4H 


4 


1 


2 


50 


4 





1 


211 


17 


4 


(1 


32 


9 








Ifi 


11 


8 


8 


22 


9 


2 





l(i 


11 


3 


3 


22 


9 


2 





5« 


4 


(I 





48 


2 


1 





87 


2 





(1 


37 


1 








8K 


8 








36 


7 


1 





84 


14 


3 


1 


29 


18 


2 


1 


84 


15 


2 


1 


47 


6 








m 


11 


4 


1 


66 


8 


1 


1 


8« 


3 


2 





36 


3 


1 





•22 


13 


1 


(1 


22 


14 








22 


6 


4 





22 


9 


1 





25 


5 


8 


1 


32 


1 








IX 


15 


5 


8 


19 


16 


3 


2 


811 


9 


8 


2 


36 


6 


2 





89 


6 


2 


2 


40 


6 


2 





82 


5 








31 


6 








85 


11 


11 


(1 


23 


13 








2H 


15 


« 


2 


29 


21 





1 


45 


7 








43 


7 


1 





25 


11 


5 


8 


38 


6 


3 


1 


82 


11 


4 


(1 


27 


18 


1 





87 


4 


8 


7 


40 


7 


3 


1 


44 


16 


2 


1 


43 


13 


3 


2 


87 


5 


2 


1 


41 


3 








2K 


13 


2 





31 


12 







9 


14 


2 





20 


5 








21 


20 


2 


2 


33 


9 





2 


48 


8 





(1 


41 


9 








81 


17 








32 


13 








2« 


4 


1 





27 


4 








58 


14 








49 


10 








85 


U 


1 


2 


33 


12 


3 





29 


IS 


8 


3 


42 


13 


2 





811 


9 


3 


5 


35 


9 


1 





48 


6 


11 





47 


5 








2fi 


11 


8 


4 


34 


10 








88 


10 





1 


40 


4 








89 


9 


1 


1 


41 


9 








7 


8 


1 





8 


7 


1 





82 


13 


3 


1 


30 


11 


5 





29 


6 


(I 





28 


4 








15 


13 


(1 





18 


10 








R 


5 





1 


8 


4 








22 


7 


2 


(1 


20 


10 








5 


17 


8 


6 


8 


22 





1 


1(1 





1 


1 


10 


2 








27 


11 


3 





23 


12 


1 





32 


9 


6 


8 


39 


9 


2 





33 


14 


8 


1 


34 


14 


2 





4fi 


6 





1 


44 


7 








55 


8 


1 


11 


66 


6 








32 


2 


(1 





30 


2 








21 


8 


1 


fl 


22 


8 








2R 


3 


(1 


(1 


27 


2 








31 


10 


8 





31 


12 







27 


8 


(1 


1 


26 


10 








32 


2 


1 





31 


4 








40 


7 


1 


8 


44 


7 








30 


9 


4 


1 


29 


7 








34 


7 








32 


6 








47 


17 


7 


10 


63 


19 








3R 


3 


2 





41 





1 


1 


2fi 


7 


1 


1 


25 


8 





1 


28 


10 


2 


(1 


24 


9 








28 


7 








29 


5 


1 





22 


12 


2 


2 


25 


12 








35 


19 


5 


2 


37 


19 










CROWD 






TEAM 


R 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


16 


23 


7 


1 


13 


21 


10 


86 


17 








35 


10 


4 


15 


17 


5 





18 


15 


4 


81 


12 


2 


1 


40 


6 


1 


22 


14 


6 


1 


24 


15 


4 


34 


9 


3 





33 


12 


3 


IX 


28 


3 





22 


22 


3 


86 


13 


1 





32 


14 


2 


5X 


11 


2 





63 


7 


3 


81 


18 


6 


1 


36 


13 


7 


88 


20 


5 





35 


19 


4 


45 


10 


2 


2 


45 


8 


4 


88 


12 


6 





35 


9 


2 


8R 


15 


3 


2 


41 


15 


1 


66 


14 


6 


2 


76 


13 


4 


41 


13 








46 


8 





2X 


10 


3 


2 


19 


18 


5 


25 


10 


2 





26 


7 


4 


25 


9 


1 





21 


9 


6 


2X 


20 


3 





24 


19 


5 


87 


12 


3 


2 


38 


10 


5 


21 


14 


5 





22 


16 


1 


48 


29 


1 


2 


48 


22 


4 


47 


25 


1 





52 


22 


1 


49 


13 


3 


(1 


45 


16 


1 


27 


12 


1 


5 


38 


7 


1 


44 


10 


1 





45 


13 





46 


5 


3 





48 


6 





IX 


16 


6 


1 


23 


18 


1 


IX 


13 


1 


1 


21 


10 


1 


IX 


13 


1 


1 


21 


10 


1 


47 


5 








47 


5 





30 


8 








32 


6 





88 


12 








34 


11 





23 


24 


2 


8 


27 


18 


6 


85 


16 


1 





32 


20 





68 


12 


3 





69 


13 


3 


32 


7 


2 





31 


6 


4 


2(1 


15 


1 





21 


13 


2 


21 


11 








20 


10 


2 


30 


3 





1 


29 


5 





17 


17 


6 


1 


17 


16 


7 


38 


10 


2 





31 


11 


2 


34 


9 


6 





34 


11 


4 


31 


5 


1 





30 


7 





31 


14 





1 


32 


14 





28 


19 


3 


2 


26 


22 


2 


34 


12 


3 


1 


33 


14 


4 


22 


14 


6 


2 


20 


10 


8 


20 


21 


5 





26 


16 


3 


82 


9 


5 


5 


29 


12 


6 


32 


24 


4 


1 


36 


21 


4 


36 


8 


1 





35 


5 


4 


29 


12 


2 





27 


16 





14 


12 








14 


11 


1 


IS 


20 


4 


8 


21 


15 


7 


28 


15 


7 





40 


11 





•29 


IB 


4 





22 


23 


3 


28 


3 





(1 


26 


6 





38 


19 


2 


1 


43 


17 





2R 


15 


7 


(1 


26 


18 


3 


30 


22 


3 


2 


31 


20 


5 


84 


11 


1 





27 


14 


4 


4fi 


9 





(1 


39 


14 


2 


30 


18 


1 





30 


13 





82 


10 


1 


1 


31 


11 


2 


29 


17 


4 


4 


36 


13 


2 


5 


7 


3 


1 


7 


7 


2 


22 


15 


12 





21 


20 


9 


25 


8 





1 


25 


7 


3 


14 


14 








12 


14 


2 


7 


6 








7 


6 


1 


20 


9 


2 





21 


8 


2 


fi 


21 


3 


1 


6 


21 


3 


10 


1 


1 


(1 


8 


4 





26 


14 


1 





30 


9 


1 


32 


12 


4 


2 


30 


17 


2 


29 


14 


7 


1 


28 


13 


5 


41 


6 


4 





44 


7 





48 


10 


4 





53 


6 


2 


30 


3 





(1 


30 


3 





16 


10 


4 





22 


8 





2fi 


4 








26 


3 


1 


23 


18 


2 


1 


27 


15 


2 


23 


12 





1 


21 


13 


2 


31 


3 





1 


27 


7 





35 


15 


3 


4 


30 


16 


2 


27 


13 


2 





27 


13 


2 


22 


17 


1 


(1 


25 


16 





39 


38 


5 





48 


31 


4 


38 


7 


1 


1 


36 


4 


2 


21 


10 


3 


1 


25 


9 


1 


18 


19 


1 





17 


13 


5 


25 


3 


3 


4 


27 


7 


1 


18 


17 


1 





18 


17 


1 


26 


26 


3 


4 


33 


21 


4 



Pape Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



St. Vincent- — 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville—. 

Sandy Hook 

Scott County- 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Sharpsburg 

Shi 



Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simmons 

Simon Kenton 

Simpsonville 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

Southern 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Symsonia 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Todd County 

Todd County Trng 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

University 

Valley 

Vanceburg-Lewis County- 
Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waddy 

Waggener 

Walton-Verona 

Wallins 

vVarfield 

County 



yland- 



Wayne 

Western 

Western 

Western (Sin 

West Main S 

Wheelwright- 

Whitesburg--. 

Williamsburg. 

Williams town 

Willisburg— 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe Co 
Woodbine 
Wurtland 



unty 

Owensboro)- 

Paris) 



ty- 



COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 








OFFICIALS 














G 


V 


P 


E G 


F 


P 


E 


G F 


p 


E 


G F 


1 15 





1 


27 


12 


2 





22 


16 


2 





24 


12 


2 


1 13 


1 





49 


13 








37 


21 


3 





44 


16 





1 12 


3 


1 


39 


13 








36 


14 


2 





29 


14 


6 


1 16 


4 


2 


44 


12 





1 


39 


13 


2 


3 


39 


16 


2 


1 9 


2 





47 


4 


2 





46 


6 


3 


1 


85 


11 


3 


1 8 


2 





44 


7 








37 


13 








43 


10 


2 


1 9 





1 


32 


14 


2 





23 


16 


5 


1 


23 


16 


2 


1 14 


2 


3 


38 


9 


6 





28 


16 


4 


4 


38 


12 


1 


1 8 


1 


?. 


53 


6 








42 


16 


2 





45 


12 


2 


1 18 


1 





35 


17 








30 


21 


1 





31 


17 


4 


1 12 


1 





34 


7 








23 


16 


3 





23 


16 


3 


1 18 


1 


n 


30 


9 








24 


13 


1 


1 


27 


9 


2 


1 14 


2 


n 


33 


11 








25 


17 


2 





29 


15 





1 6 


3 





49 


6 








32 


10 


7 





38 


10 


1 


1 33 


5 


1 


37 


26 








24 


35 


4 





23 


33 


10 


1 3 








14 


4 








15 


6 








14 


6 





1 38 


4 


2 


48 


24 


1 





32 


41 








33 


38 


8 


1 9 


1 


1 


40 


6 


1 





30 


18 


1 





36 


13 





1 18 


3 


n 


30 


14 


1 





15 


17 


6 


7 


20 


17 


6 


1 7 


1 


n 


34 


10 


1 





34 


9 


2 


1 


32 


10 


2 


1 16 








40 


9 








33 


23 


1 





33 


18 


1 


1 7 








46 


6 








37 


15 


1 





40 


12 


2 


1 9 


3 


2 


36 


13 








33 


15 


2 





37 


11 


1 


1 7 


1 





40 


6 








37 


6 


3 





39 


5 


2 


1 16 


4 


3 


67 


21 







49 


31 


11 





66 


23 


1 


1 9 


3 


1 


26 


12 


1 





19 


18 


2 





23 


13 


3 


1 13 


1 


n 


34 


12 


1 





30 


14 


2 





33 


16 


2 


1 9 


1 


1 


31 


6 





1 


26 


8 


3 


1 


23 


13 


2 


1 14 


3 


4 


47 


8 





1 


37 


15 


3 


1 


46 


8 


1 


1 5 


1 


1 


38 


5 


1 





36 


9 


1 





36 


7 


2 


1 9 








33 


7 








32 


10 


4 





29 


10 


2 


1 7 


3 


3 


35 


6 








31 


8 


1 


1 


29 


9 


2 


1 9 


3 





25 


4 





1 


21 


7 


1 


1 


18 


10 


1 


1 9 


4 


2 


34 


8 


1 


1 


31 


7 


3 


3 


30 


10 


1 


1 10 





fl 


30 


6 








23 


8 


6 





25 


8 


3 


1 4 








35 


7 







31 


9 


1 


1 


28 


10 


1 


1 7 


1 





37 


4 


2 





34 


8 


1 





36 


7 





1 10 





3 


30 


5 





2 


16 


19 


4 





25 


13 


1 


17 


6 


3 


37 


10 


3 





21 


23 


7 





26 


22 


4 


12 


3 


2 


21 


13 


2 





16 


17 


2 


1 


18 


14 


3 


16 





1 


43 


11 


1 





40 


14 


4 





36 


20 


3 






1 


47 


7 


1 





39 


16 


1 





46 


12 


1 


9 





n 


32 


7 








27 


12 


1 





30 


7 


2 


6 


1 


1 


45 


4 








41 


5 


2 


2 


43 


3 


4 


21 


1 


2 


45 


15 


1 





44 


17 


2 





48 


18 


1 




1 





48 


6 








29 


24 


2 





40 


14 


1 







1 


53 


1 








39 


14 


1 





46 


8 





12 


7 


4 


42 


11 





1 


31 


22 


2 


1 


35 


19 


1 


16 


1 


1 


46 


7 








36 


17 


1 





34 


14 


5 


6 








39 


5 





1 


27 


16 


2 





30 


12 


3 


7 


3 





32 


6 


1 





26 


8 


4 


3 


29 


7 


3 


5 


7 


2 


35 


4 


3 


1 


33 


6 


4 





32 


8 


3 




1 





37 


4 


1 




30 


9 


1 


2 


31 


9 


1 


3 


5 


n 


25 


2 








25 


8 








30 


2 


1 


6 








62 


7 








63 


12 


1 


2 


66 


11 


3 


6 


3 


1 


44 


3 


1 





39 


4 


3 


1 


34 


11 


1 




1 


1 


35 


7 


1 





27 


14 


2 





27 


11 


3 


13 


4 


.s 


37 


10 





1 


29 


16 


fl 


3 


27 


16 


2 




1 


2 


18 


11 


2 





14 


14 


2 


1 


20 


10 


3 


2 








39 


2 


n 





.12 


6 


4 





36 


6 


fl 


5 


3 


6 


26 


3 


3 


2 


20 


8 


3 


3 


23 


7 




6 


6 





32 


5 


1 





27 


4 


4 


n 


26 








5 


8 


32 


6 


1 





19 


15 


6 





22 


12 


4 




2 


4 


67 


IB 





1 


46 


23 


3 


1 


48 


27 


1 




1 





51 


12 


2 





46 


18 


2 


1 


40 


18 


2 


11 


2 





22 


16 


1 





19 


18 


1 


n 


21 


18 




10 


8 


11 


26 


9 


7 


2 


17 


13 


12 


7 


16 


12 




10 


H 





29 


12 


1 


n 


24 


10 


in 


1 


25 


17 




7 


3 





35 


6 





2 


29 


!) 


5 





32 







MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING— 

(Continued from Page Four) 

The vote on this motion was a 4-4 tie. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools be polled to determine their wishes concern- 
ing the site of the 1961 State High School Basketball 
Tournament; that whichever of the two sites involved, 
Louisville or Lexington, is named for 1961, the other 
site be considered the 1962 site; that this plan be con- 
tingent upon satisfactory arrangements being made 
with those in charge of the tournament sites by the 
State Tournament Manager and the Board of Control; 
and that the Board go on record as recommending 
to future Boards of Control that the alternation plan 
be followed. The motion was carried unanimously. 



There was a discussion of the insurance subsidy 
to be allowed each K.H.S.A.A. member school for 
1960-61. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the insurance subsidy for each member 
school be the same for 1960-61 as that for 1959-60, 
namely, a basic amount of $30.00, with an additional 
subsidy of $30.00 for each school maintaining football. 

Mr. Gillaspie stated that he was recommending 
the additional amount for schools playing football be- 
cause of anticipated profits from the football playoffs 
during the forthcoming season, although no profits 
were realized by the K.H.S.A.A. from the playoffs 
during 1959. The Board agreed with Mr. Gillaspie con- 
cerning the additional subsidy for schools maintaining 
football, and the reason for it being allowed for 1960- 
61. The motion was carried unanimously. 

In an executive session, Louis Litchfield moved, 
seconded by Cecil A. Thornton, that the annual salary 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



Page Fifteen 



of Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, beginning July 1, 
1960, be set at $11,000.00; and that the annual salary 
of Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield, beginning 
July 1, 1960, be set at $8,500.00. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil A.. Thorn- 
ton, that the bills of the Association for the period 
beginning April 22, 1930, and ending May 20, 1960, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



IN MEMORIAM— 

(Continued from Page Three) 

H. M. Wesley 

Henry Mark Wesley, who retired May 27, 
1960, as principal of Hazard High School, 
died June 1, 1960, in a Danville hospital. The 
67-year-old educator underwent surgery in 
March and returned to the hospital the last 
of May. 

Mr. Wesley started his teaching career in 
his native Casey County in 1911, teaching 
four years at Stapp Elementary and three 
years at Liberty Graded. He served in the 
Navy during World War I, then returned 
to Berea where he was graduated in 1922. 
He served as principal and coach of Sonora 
High School in Hardin County from 1922- 
29. While coaching here, Ted Hornback of 
Western was a member of his team. From 
1929-34 he served as principal of Campbell 
County High School at Alexandria.. While 
here he continued an interest in athletics by 
coaching the girls' team in basketball. 

Mr. Wesley's further school service was 
as follows: ] 934-39, Principal Milton High 
School, Trimble County; 1939-42, Principal 
Trimble County High School, Bedford, Ken- 
tucky; 1942-51, Superintendent Cloverport- 
Breckinridge County; 1951-60, Principal 
Hazard High School. 

Mr. Wesley received the Flying Dutchman 
Award in February, 1951, while Superintend- 
ent at Cloverport, for his interest in a young 
boy whom he was able to assist in a material 
way. He held an M.A. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, granted in 1939. He 
was a lifelong member of the Methodist 
Church and member of the Board of the 
Bowman Memorial Methodist Church, Haz- 
ard, Kentucky. He was a member of the 
Hazard Kiwanis Club and President of that 
club in 1955. He was president of the 
U.K.R.E.A. (Upper Kentucky River Educa- 
tion Association) in 1958, and President of 



the Berea Alumni Association in 1959-60. 
He was elected President of his class at Berea 
in 1922, and had served as membership 
chairman of his class all through the years. 
Mr. Wesley served as President of the East- 
ern Kentucky Mountain Athletic Conference 
in 1957-58. 

Survivors are the wife, Mrs. Helen Buckles 
Wesley; two daughters, Mrs. Guy Best and 
Mrs. J. M. Whitler; a sponsored son, Young 
Nok Koo of Puson, Korea, a student at the 
University of Michigan; and two brothers, 
Perry and Irvin Wesley. 

Let it be said that he was a Christian 
gentleman and that he loved and served his 
fellow man. 

— R.G.E. 



Ralph H. Mills 

Ralph Howard Mills, Athletic Director at 
Atherton High School and a coach of Ken- 
tucky high school teams for more than twen- 
ty-five years, died at St. Joseph Infirmary, 
Louisville, on May 1, 1960. He was fifty-five. 
He had undergone an operation a few days 
before, after having entered the hospital on 
April 15. 

Survivors were his wife, the former Vir- 
ginia Ferguson ; three daughters, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Hughes, Davton, Ohio; Mrs. Clayton 
Foster, Hopkinsville, and Miss Elsie Michele 
Mills ; two sons, Ralph J. and Eric Harris 
Mills ; three sisters, Mrs. Irving Trost, 
Birmingham, Mrs. Fred Duran, Auburn. Ala., 
and Mrs. H. A. Yarlington, Waco, Texas ; a 
brother, Charles Mills, Birmingham, and two 
grandchildren. 

Mr. Mills was graduate of Georgetown 
College, where he starred in football. A na- 
tive of Opelika, Ala., he coached at Wayne, 
W. Va., before going to Hopkinsville High 
School in 1937. His football teams compiled 
outstanding records at Hopkinsville during 
the 1937-49 period. At one time Mr. Mills' 
football teams won twenty-three consecutive 
games (1939-41) and they were ranked 
among the top ten in the state from 1939 to 
1949. In 1941 Mr. Mills was named "Coach 
of The Year" by Kentucky coaches. He 
served in the Air Corps during World War 
II, and missed the football seasons of 1942, 
1943, and 1944. 

In 1949 Mr. Mills became head coach at 
Vero Beach, Fla., but he left there to come to 
Atherton. He joined the athletic faculty as 
head basketball coach and assistant football 
coach in 1950, the year Atherton, previously 
a girls' school, became co-educational. He 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1960 



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was appointed athletic director at Atherton 
in March, 1956. 

Mr. Mills was a mathematics teacher 
throug-hout his career at Atherton, teaching 
classes in geometry and advanced algebra. 
Atherton principal Russell Garth says that 
Mills taught a regular five-period schedule 
of math classes and was an "excellent teach- 



New Football Film 

The premier showing of OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, 
the newest addition to the Official Sports Film Service 
family of official rules films, was held during the 41st 
Annual Meeting of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations at Glacier National 
Park, July 1960. Prints of this film were released to 
distributors following this meeting. The K.H.S.A.A. has 
rented two prints of the film and has placed them on 
loan with the film library at the University of Ken- 
tucky. 

OFFICIAL FOOTBALL was produced under the 
sanction and supervision of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations and in co- 
operation with the National Association of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics and the National Junior College 
Athletic Association. This film is the nineteenth in the 
series of official films and the eighth football film. 

General Mills, Inc. and Wilson Sporting Goods 



Co. are again serving as co-sponsors of the film as they 
have for the previous eighteen rules films. 

The scenes for OFFICIAL FOOTBALL were film- 
ed in Albuquerque Municipal Stadium, Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. The host state association was the New 
Me.xico High School Activities Association. Playing 
personnel was chosen from Highland High School in 
Albuquerque. Members of the Technical Staff were 
chosen from such widely separated states as Alabama, 
Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Missouri, New Mexico, 
Oiegon, Utah and West Virginia. 

OFFICIAL FOOTBALL portrays play situations 
covering the official interpretations of a panorama of 
basic rules of football as played under the National 
Alliance code. The theme is centered around the rules 
as they apply to the three teams always present on 
the field-home team, visiting team and that all im- 
portant third team — the Officials. It is recommended 
for use by officials, coaches, players and fans for a 
better understanding and enjoyment of the game of 
football. 

Mills Memorial Fund 

Some of the closest associates of Ralph Mills have 
set up the Ralph H. Mills Memorial Fund. Custodians 
of this fund will be J. Frank Yeager and Patrick S. 
Kirwan. Only Mrs. Ralph H. Mills will be authorized 
to draw checks on this fund. The Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association has started the drive with 
a donation of $100.00. All contributions should be made 
out (by check or money order) to the Ralph H. Mills 
Memorial Fund, and should be addressed to 619 Up- 
land Road, Louisville 6, Kentucky, 



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We hope you visited our display at the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington on August 10-13, 1960. 

If you failed to place your order at that time we are still able to take care 
of any football orders in the most satisfactory manner, as our stock of 
football equipment is larger and more complete than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feel confident that we can have the mer- 
chandise in your possession in plenty of time for any requirement. 

Any shipment made during the months of August or September will carry 
November 1, 1960 dating. 

On any of j'our incidental supplies check upon the following: 

Football tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder pad laces, 
pant laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, rubber teeth guards 
or protectors, helmet paint for leather or plastic helmets, all types 
of chin straps, aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line 
white for marking football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, 
linesmen's chains, goal line markers, sideline markers, football 
goal posts, sideline capes. Fair Play football scoreboards. Fair 
Play basketball scoreboards., portable bleachers, dry or wet line 
markers. Whirlpool Baths, Vibra Whirl Baths by Cramer, foot- 
ball posters, first-aid kits, Cramer's first-aid supplies, a com- 
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For "on-the-ground service," Sutcliffe's school representatives 
will contact you during the year, as usual. 



Harry Blackburn, 1340 Linwood Avenue, Columbus, Ohio will cover 
the Big Sandy Valley. "Chuck" Shuster, Box 231, Horse Cave, 
Kentucky, Phone State 6-6981 will cover western and southern 
Kentucky. Bill Shannon, 122 Yancey Drive, So. Fort Mitchell, 
Kentucky, Phone Dixie 1-5634 will cover northern, cenntral and 
eastern Kentucky. Al Lecomte, 2502 Cottonwood Drive, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, Phone TVV 3-7646 will cover the Louisville area. 



SUTCLIFFE'S CATALOG 

If your copy of our Fall I960 catalog is not received by September 10, please drop > . 
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Hiqh khool Athlete 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Charlie Vettiner, School Director; Briscoe Inman, R. 12; Joe Richard- 
son, R. 4; LaRue Sosh, R. 3; Turner Elrod, R. 5; Ralph Mussman, R. 9. Second Row: Harry Stephen- 
son, R. 11; Bill Nau, R. 13; Dick Looney, R. 15; Jack Wise, R. 10; Ernie Chattin, R. 16. Third Row: 
Howard Gardner, R. 6 ; Charlie Irwin, R. 2 ; Rex Alexa nder, R. 1 ; Claude Ricketts, R. 7 ; Paul Wright, R. 14. 



Omeial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
SEPTEMBER - ISGD 



<r 



in 



Football Officials Meet at Lexington 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jack Faust, Falls Cities Officials Association, Louisville; Dave Longenecker, 
Metropolitan Football Officials Association, Louisvlle; Ralph Mussman. Northern Kentucky Conference Offic- 
ials Association, Newport. Second Row: Kean Jenkins, Mid-Kentucky Football Officials Association, Elizabeth- 
town; Clinic Director Edgar McNabb, Fort Mitchell; Bill Mordica, Northeastern Kentucky Football Officials 
Association. Ashland; Bernard Johnson, Officials Booking Department. Central Kentucky Conference, Lexington. 



The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
socitaion conducted a two day meeting for 
football officials on August 12-13 in Lexing- 
ton. Officials from various sections of the 
state were in attendance. These men will as- 
sist in registration of new officials, and will 
be available for meetings and clinics through- 
out the forthcoming season. 

Edgar McNabb, Kentucky's voting dele- 
gate on the National Federation Football 
Committee, was director of the school. Mr. 
McNabb, who is Assistant Principal and Ath- 
letic Director of the Beechwood High School, 
South Fort Mitchell, was in charge of the 
1960 clinics for football officials. 



The three sessions of the School included 
the following: 

Report on the National Alliance Rules 
meeting by Mr. McNabb 

Discussions of the 1960 rules changes 

Roundtable discussion of situations and 
interpretations arising during the 1959 sea- 
son 

Showing of the new film,, Official Football 
Duties of the referee — Bernard Johnson 
Duties of the Umpire — Dave Longenecker 
Duties of the Linesman — Bill Mordica 
Duties of the Field Judge — Kean Jenkins 
General summary of pre-game mechanics 
General review of rules and play situationg 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXIII— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note 
rule. They are 
ntuations which 



These rulings do not set aside 
interpretations on some of the 
have been presented. 

Installment I 



modify any 
rly season 



1. Play: (a) After extending- one hand at full 
arm's length above his head, Rl waves it sidewise; or 
(b) does not hold his arm at full length above his 
head. Rl then catches the ball. 

Ruling: Invalid fair-catch signal in both (a) and 
(b). Not a fair catch. Rl may be tackled. If the in- 
valid fair-catch signal puts Team K at a disadvantage, 
the act may be considered unsportsmanlike conduct. 
(2-3-3; 9-3). 

Play: Rl gives a valid fair-catch signal and (a) 
catches the ball; (b) R2 catches the ball; or (c) Rl 
muffs the ball. 

Ruling: (a) Fair catch and R may put the ball 
in play by a snap or free-kick anywhere between the 
inbounds lines on the yardline through the spot of the 
catch. In (b), it is not a fair catch, however, the ball 
becomes dead when caught but the clock is not stopped 
and R will put the ball in play by snap at the spot of 
the catch if between the inbounds lines or on the proper 
yardline at the correct inbounds lines spot if the kick 
was caught in the side zone. In (c), when Rl muffed 
the kick, the provisions of the fair-catch rule no 
longer apply and the ball may be recovered by either 
team but may not be advanced by K. (2-3-3) 

3. Play: R2, R3 and R4 simultaneously signal for 
a fair catch. Rl, who: (a) also signaled; or (b) did 
not signal makes the catch. 

Ruling: There is no infraction because several 
players of R signaled for a fair catch of the same 
kick. It is a fair catch in (a). In (b), it is not a fair 
catch, although the ball becomes dead. If a teammate 
of the signaler catches a kick beyond the line, ball 
becomes dead but it is not a fair catch and the clock 
is not stopped. (2-3-3) 

4. Play: Al is in area extending laterally 4 yards 
on either side of the spot of the snap and 2 yards be- 
hind each scrimmage line at the time of the snap. 
B4 is blocked from behind in this 8 yard x 4 yard area. 

Ruling: Al may legally block from the rear in the 
8 yard x 4 yard area provided he is in this area at 
the time of snap and provided he makes his block in 
the 8 yard x 4 yard zone during close line play. (2-4) 

5. Play: With the score 14 to 12 in favor of Team 
A, Team B has scored on a punt return and a kick- 
off return. The kick-off by Team A is in the air as 
time for the end of the second half expires. A2 
tackles Bl so that he cannot catch the kick-off and 
the ball rolls into B's end zone. 

Ruling: Game is over as soon as ball touches 
anything in R's end zone. The foul is by the Offense 
and, therefore, the period cannot be extended by an 
untimed down. (3-3-3) 

6. Play: During a down, Al advances 55 yards. 
As the Referee spots the ball he notices the chain crew 
and boxman are not ready. 




Ruling: The Official will order the clock stopped 
to permit the chain crew and boxman to properly 
place their implements, after which the Referee will 
declare the ball ready-for-play and signal the clock 
to start. This situation should be administered in the 
same manner regardless of when it occurs during a 
game. (3-4-1) 

7. Play: 2nd and 4 on B's 30. Team A Captain 
advises Referee he wants time-out after succeeding 
play. 

Ruling: While there is no coverage stating, in so 
many words, when a Captain must make a request for 
a specific time-out, the word "legal" in 3-4-2 (a) must 
be broadly construed and, from a procedural stand- 
point, the Referee should not honor such a request. 
If a request such as this were honored, the Captain 
could ask for time-out following the 2nd and 4th 
downs or some other equally absurd times. Any re- 
quests for time-out should be made for the immediate 
time and not for some future down. (3-4-2 (a)) 

8. Play: While the clock is: (a) running; or (b) 
stopped, Al requests and receives from his bench, a 
chin strap. Without assistance from an attendant or 
without delay, Al, with the help of a teammate or 
official, quickly attaches a chin strap to his helmet. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. If the clock 
has been stopped for repair of equipment of Al and 
there has been no charged time-out during the dead 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 



VOL. XXHI— NO. 



K.H.S.A.A. Leaders 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 
Editor — THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant'Edito;::::::: j. b. mansfield 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOAHD OF CONTROL 

President-- Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Vice-President W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors— W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-621. Louisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63), Green- 
ville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-631. Georgetown; Oran G. Teater 
(1960-641, Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 
Subscription Rates SLOO Per Year 



Off, 



Jrom the Commissioned s WTUce 

Basketball Clinics 

The 1960-61 rules meeting for registered basket- 
baU officials and coaches \\'ill be conducted by Charlie 
Vettiner, veteran basketball clinic director who has 
served the Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
for so many years. 

The dates and sites of the meetings are as fol- 
lows : 

October 2, Newport High School, 1:30 P.M. (EST) 

October 2, University High School, Lexington, 
8:00 P. M. (EST) 

October 3, Morehead State College, 1:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 3, Ashland P.M.C.A., 8:00 (EST) 

October 4, Pikeville High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 4, Hazard High School, 8:00 (EST) 

October 5, Bell High School, Pineville, 1:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 5, Somerset High School, 7:00 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 6, Louisville, 7:00 P. M. (CST) 

October 9, Elizabethtown High School, 1:30 P.M. 
(CST) 

October 9, Bowling Green High School, 7:00 P.M. 
(CST) 

October 10, Hopkinsville High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 10, Mayfield High School, 7:00 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 11, Henderson High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 11, Daviess County High School, Owen.s- 
boro, 7:00 P. M. (CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 

Lists of registered football and basketball of- 
ficials appear in this issue of the ATHLETE. Prin- 
cipals and coaches should study the current lists to 
determine whether or not all officials with whom 
contracts have been signed have registered this fall. 
Supplementary lists of officials will appear in sub- 
sequent issues of the magazine. By-Law 22 provides 
that member schools shall use registered officials 
in all football and ba.sketball games, and the failure 
to comply with this regulation makes the home school 
liable for suspension. If there is any question about 
registration, the official should be asked to present 
his card. 



A^k 




Louis Litchfield 
President 



W. B. Jones 
Vice-President 



Supt. Louis Litchfield of the Crittenden County 
Schools, Board of Control member representing Sec- 
tion 1, was elected President of the Board of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association at the 
summer meeting of the Board of Control, held on July 
30. Prin. W. B. Jones of the Somerset High School is 
the new Vice-President of the Association. He rep- 
resents Section 6. 

Mr. Litchfield was born in Blackford in Webster 
County on August 29, 1910. A graduate of the Black- 
ford High School, he attended Murray State College, 
receiving his B.S. degree from that Institution in 1937. 
He had teaching and coaching assignments at the 
Blackford Juniof High School, Fredonia High School, 
Cobb High School, Nebo High School, Farmersville 
High School, Frances High School, and Crittenden 
County High School. In July of 1956 he became Super- 
intendent of Crittenden County Schools. 

In 1939 Mr. Litchfield married Miss Birdie (^uisen- 
berry of Princeton. They have two children. During the 
period of 1943-1947, he was Assistant Commissioner 
of Agriculture for the state of Kentucky. Mr. Litch- 
field is a member of K.E.A. and N.EA. On several 
occasions he has been a member of the K.E.A. and 
K.H.S.A.A. delegate assemblies. He was a "certified" 
basketball official for several years, and he was a 
State Tournament referee four times. He is a former 
member of the Murray State College Board of Re- 
gents. He is a deacon of the Marion Baptist Church. 

Mr. Jones was born in Monroe County on August 
8, 1900. He attended schools in Monroe and Barren 
counties, graduating from the Cave City High School 
in 1920. He received his A.B. degree from Western 
Kentucky State College in 1925. He had teaching 
assignments in a ruial one-room school, the Cave City 
grade school, and Merry Oaks School (Barren County). 
He was principal of the Middleton High School in 
Simpson County in 1925-1927, assistant principal and 
principal of the Somerset High School since 1935. 

In 1928 Mr. Jones received his M.A. degree from the 
University of Chicago. He married Miss Willie Boyer 
in 1930. They have three children. 

Mr. Jones was a member of the K.E.A. Research 
Committee in 1929-1932. He is the author of numer- 
ous articles on the subject of Education. He was chair- 
man of the K.E..4. Credentials Committee for the 
1933-1939 period. He is a member of K.E.A., N.E.A., 
the Department of Secondary School Principals, and 
Phi Delta Kappa. He is a Mason, an elder in the 
Somerset Presbyterian Church, and is past president 
of the Somerset Kiwanis Club. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Page Three 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kenlake Hotel, Ken- 
tucky Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, July 
30, 1960. The meeting was called to order by Vice- 
President Louis Litchfield at 9:30, with all Board mem- 
bers, Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the May 21st meet- 
ing be waived, since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Mr. Litchfield, representing the Board of Control, 
spoke words of appreciation for the long service of 
retiring President Russell Williamson to the Board 
and to the K.H.S.A.A. Mr. Williamson responded with 
appropriate remarks. 

Mr Litchfield stated that the next order of busi- 
ness was the election of the president and vice-presi- 
dent of the Board of Control. W. H. Crowdus nomi- 
nated Louis Litchfield for the presidency of the Board 
of Control. W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Robert 
P. Forsythe, that Mr. Litchfield be elected by accla- 
mation. All voted "aye" but Mr. Litchfield who did not 
vote. 

Cecil A. Thornton nominated W. B. Jones foi' the 
vice-presidency, and Oran C. Teater nominated Jack 
Dawson, K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Robert P. 
Forsythe, that the nominations cease, and the motion 
was carried. W. B. Jones asked that his name be with- 
drawn from nomination. Mr. Thornton declined to 
withdraw the nomination. Ballots were passed, and 
a tabulation of ballots by Messrs. Sanford and William- 
son indicated that Mr. Jones had been elected over 
Mr. Dawson by a vote of 4 to 3. 

President Litchfield welcomed to the Board Super- 
intendent Oran C. Teater of Paintsville, newly elected 
Director representing Section 8. 

Ihe Commissioner stated that the poll of K.H.S.A. 
A. member school principals, authorized by the Board 
in the May meeting, had resulted in Lexington being 
the choice of the State Basketball Tournament site 
for 1961, the vote being 267 for Lexington and 133 
for Louisville. In line with the previous policy adopted 
by the Board, Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by 
W. H. Crowdus, that Lexington be named the State 
Basketball Tournament site for 1961 and that Louis- 
ville be named the site for 1962, this plan being con- 
tingent upon satisfactory arrangements being made 
with those in charge of the tournament sites, by 
the State Tournament Manager and by the Board of 
Control. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board on 
the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. for 
the year 1959-60. He presented copies of the audit, re- 
cently prepared by the Johnson-Fowler Company of 
Louisville. Total funds on hand June 30, 1960, were 
reported as being $80,628.44. He stated that a com- 
plete breakdown on receipts and expenses would appear 
in a forthcoming issue of the magazine. He then pre- 
sented a proposed K.H.S.A.A. budget for the 1960-61 
school year with estimated receipts of $107,600.00 and 
estimated disbursements of $107,550.00. After a gen- 
eral discussion of the budget items, K. G. Gillaspie 
moved, seconded by Robert P. Forsythe, that the report 
of the Commissioner be accepted and approved; and 
that the 1960-61 K.H.S.A.A. budget be adopted as pre- 
sented. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A Thornton and K. G. Gillaspie gave reports 



on the annual meeting of the National Federation, held 
in East Glacier Park, Montana, on July 3-6, 1960. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that the next meeting of the Board of Control be held 
in Lexington on October 22, 1960. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 

K.H.S.A.A. Contribution to U.K. Coaching School 

The Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
made important contributions to the 1960 University of 
Kentucky Coaching School, held in Lexington on Aug- 
ust 10-13. The Association was in charge of the base- 
ball and track clinics, and cooperated with the Kentucky 
State Medical Association, the Kentucky Advisory 
School Health Council, and the University of Kentucky 
Athletic Association in presenting the Athletic Injury 
Prevention Conference. 

The baseball clinic was conducted by Dr. John 
Heldman, Jr., baseball Coach at the University of 
Louisville. Dr. Heldman was assisted by Coach James 
DeSpain of the Paducah Tilghman High School, Coach 
Harry Lancaster of the University of Kentucky, Coach 
Charles T. Hughes of the Eastern Kentucky State Col- 
lege, and former Coach Harry Stephenson of Transyl- 
vania College. 

The track clinic was conducted by Coach Bernie 
Sadosky of the Highlands High School, Fort Thomas. 
He was assisted by Coach Brad Jones of Georgetown 
College, Coach Jerry Denny of the Trinity High 
School, John Meihaus of the St. Xavier High School, 
Coach James A. Gray of the Waggener High School, 
and UK staff member Bernard Johnson. 

Participating in the Athletic Injury Corrference 
were Dr. Carroll L. Witten, Dr. Paul J. Ross, and Dr. 
Clinton R. Potts of Louisville; Dr. Owen B. Murphy 
and Dr. John B. Floyd of Lexington. Dr. Witten, who 
presided, is chairman of KSMA Associate Committee 
on School Health. Topics discussed were The Prevention 
and Treatment of Injuries to the Knee, Shoulder, and 
Ankle; The Prevention and Treatment of Other Com- 
mon Musculo-Skeletal Injurier; The Prevention and 
Treatment of Head and Brain Injuries; and The Pre- 
vention and Treatment of Emotional aspects of Ath- 
letic Competition. 



Attention, Sponsors and Cheerleaders! 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Organization 
Sponsors (KAPOS) and Transylvania College will spon- 
sor a clinic on Saturday, October 1, for cheerleaders 
and their sponsors. Director of the clinic will be Miss 
Pauline Hess, owner and director of Camp AU-Amer- 
ican, who is Cheerleader Coach at Michigan State 
and Executive Secretary of the United States Cheer- 
leader Association. Miss Hess is bringing four of her 
precision cheerleaders with her. 

All sponsors will be guests of the Transylvania 
Athletic Association for lunch. There will be a style 
show for the cheerleaders, and a chance to visit on 
the College campus. 

Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school 
has received a letter, giving the details of the clinic. 

The Date October 1 

The Time 8:30-4:00 

Registration Fee $2.00 per person 

McAllister Auditorium Transylvania College 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

A lot of things have happened since the 
Dutchman wrote his last column in May. 
"Butch" Charmoli has become a grandfather, 
Joe Billv Mansfield helped to represent the 
K. H. S.'a. a. at Glacier National Park at the 
Annual meeting of the National Federation 
of High School Athletic Associations, Jack 
Wise and Claude Ricketts served their first 
terms as regional representatives at the 
School of Basketball Officials, and Paducah 
embarked on a search for a full-time recrea- 
tion director. 

Don Malone, Ironton (Ohio) official, was 
an observer at the School for Basketball Of- 
ficials at Lexington in August. Other "for- 
eigners" joined Don in his expression that 
such schools would do much toward causing 
officiating to become uniform nationally if 
they were set up in every state. 

Two days are available for concentrated 
study of mechanics, techniques and rules. 
The "top minds" from Kentucky's sixteen 
regions discuss, learn and agree on how the 
game should be worked. The conclusions ar- 
rived at are taken back to the officials in 
their regions. Such influence from this meet- 
ing is bound to mean more uniformity of 
officiating throughout the Commonwealth. 

Here's more about the K.H.S.A.A. School 
for Basketball Officials which causes it to be 
outstanding and enjoyable. It is always 
scheduled in August during the time the all- 
star football and basketball games are play- 
ed. This causes friendly association of the 
coaching and officiating fi-aternities which 
means a closer understanding and ultimately 
less friction during the season. It gives offi- 
cials from the east a chance to merge ideas 
and thoughts with those from the west. 

Off hours from the School generally find 
the officiating students either teeing off at 
some of Lexington's fine golf courses or 
swapping stories of their golfing feats. Golf- 
ing stories seem to have fallen into the cate- 
gory of fishing stories — nobody believes 
them. 

Centre College Coach Briscoe Inman, Bar- 
bourville's Bill Nau and Transylvania's HaiTy 
Stephenson are top flight golfers who re- 
fused to give anything but a "belly laugh" to 
the Dutchman's golfing tale that he had 
scored an eagle on a 570 yard hole in Louis- 
ville so the Dutchman promised to mail each 
of them an affidavit signed by his three 
golfing buddies on the day of the memorable 
feat. Read the following affidavit: 

"This is to certify that we were playing 




THE DUTCHMAN 

with Charlie Vettiner when he scored an 
Eagle on the 570 yard number 2 hole at 
Shawnee Park in early August. 

His drive plus a 4 wood shot had his ball 
on the green 10 yards past the hole. His 
deadly accuracy with his putter then record- 
ed the Eagle." (signed) Bob Beanblossom, 
Oakley Brown, James McLain. 

Now read Bill Nau's reply: 

"Nice shooting: Please give wind velocity 
and degree of slope on fairways, plus type 
of gun used to fire ball. Sincerely." (signed) 
Bill Nau. 

You can't win an argument in this school, 
but you can have a lot of fun. 

If you are a trained recreation leader, in- 
terested in heading up a city-wide program 
of recreation in one of Kentucky's finest 
cities, write to Burton Robbins, Pittsburgh 
Plate Glass Company, Paducah. Paducah's 
lead is bound to be followed in the Kentucky 
towns and counties, thus opening good job 
possibilities in the field of recreation. 

A sports fan once told me that the only 
thing he liked about the passing of summer 
was the beginning of the schoolboy football 
season. The Elizabethtown Catholic High 
School Knights Boosters' Club must feel the 
same way. In the middle of August the 
Dutchman was the guest speaker at the first 
Boosters' Club Dinner. The sports-minded 
parents and friends planned ways to make 
sports better and kids happier during the 
coming season. 

Those E'town Catholic Boosters know how 
to do things. Under the leadership of Tom 
Baldwin of Radio Station WIEL, a lot of 
imagination was in evidence, and that's what 
is necessary to spice up a sports program. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Page Five 



For his unselfish work for young men, Tom 
Baldwin is the winner of the first Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for the sports year of 1960- 
1961. Besides rolling out a "very red carpet" 
for the Dutchman, they had Kean Jenkins, 
Hardin County Referee, and Coach Irby 
Hummer escort him for eighteen holes of 
golf at the Country Club. 

Answer to Dick Looney's question: 
We are expecting about 2200 officials, 
coaches and observers at our fifteen clinics 
in October. About 1900 miles of driving will 
be necessary. Right now the Dutchman is 
getting ready to visit Indiana Colonels L.V. 
Phillips and Bob Hinshaw in Indianapolis for 
the Indiana High School Basketball Clinic 
scheduled for the last Saturday in September. 
The final thought for this column is for 
our coaches : Wealthy people miss one of life's 
greatest thrills - paying the last installment. 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K. H. S. A. A.^1960 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adkins, Wendell L., P. O. Box 57, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3644, 

MO 4-3444 
Allen, Charles E., 9005 Lagrange Rd., Lyndon, TW 5-3069 
Almon, James H., 187 First St., Lynch. 848-5942 
Alston, E. Deedom, 473 S. 11th, Louisville, SP 2-1092, JU 7-6129 
Anderson. E. W., Jr.. 504 Highland, Mayfield, OH 7-1794, 
CH 7-1637 

Atkinson, Charlie, 26 E. 19th St., Paris, 172,38 
Attick, William E., 8504 Shirley Lane, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

WA 1-3421, Ft. Knox 4-2759 
Autore, Daniel, Box 172, Wheelwright, 2362 
Baker. Charles Joe, 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 443-3043, 6-6311, 

Ext. 685 
Ballard, Robert A., Route 3, Shelbyville, ME 3-1238, ME 3-1863 
Barbour, Morris H., 440 Wilberforce Ct., Louisville 
Barlow, Billy, 3050 Lynnwood Dr., Paris, 63 T, Lexington 

2-2220, Ext. 2263 
Barlow, Bob, Lynnwood Dr., Paris, 1979 
Barnett, Willis E., 2208 W. Chestnut, Louisville, SP 8-7626, 

WH 4-6373 
Bartels, John, 423 3rd Ave., Dayton, JU 1-4260, HE 1-9088 
Baskin Sylvester, 214 West Street, Lynch, 848-5637 
Bauer, Richard, 721 Kent, New Albany, Indiana, WH 4-1102, 

ME 4-1581, Ext. 475 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson, Louisville, ME 4-1737, JU 2-3511, 

Ext. 381 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 So. 41st St., Louisville, SP 8-7792. 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 7124 
Bennett. Howard "Pete", Route 6, Mayfield, CH 7-3309, 

CH 7-3510 
Berry. William F., 1633 Jackson, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6765 
Blankenbeckler, Ralph B., 2915 Carr, Ashland, 5-2710, 4-1111 
Blanton, Homer, 138 New Hampshire Dr., Ashland, East 

4-1730, East 4-3730 
Boeh, Bill, 3804 McNicholas, Deer Park 36, Ohio, SY 1-8880, 

PC 1-1876 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson Ave., So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-1708, 

PA 1-2700, Ext. 350 
Boeing. Charles F., 3959 Delmar, Cincinnati, Ohio, MO 1-7032, 

DU 1-6061 
Bond, Jack C, 2067 Clays Mill Rd., Lexington, 7-2351, 2-2260, 

Ext. 2789 
Bonner. John C. 5335 Buckner Ave., Louisville, EM 8-222, 

EM 3-9902 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 W. 12th. Bowling Green, VI 3-3319 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

6-8111, 2-3343 
Boyles, Jerry, 2700 Algonquin, Ashland, 4-6995, 4-1111, Ext. 238 
Brandenburg. Donald E., 714 Exeter Ave., Middlesboro, 1139 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, KI 

1-6049, PA, 1-1984 
Briscoe, Edw. D., Jr., 322 Ridgedale Rd., Louisville, TW 3-3028, 

JU 3-6671, Ext. 422 



Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6843. 

JU 7-9111 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, SP 6-2606 

SP 6-2506 
Brown, Bill, 1725 Quarry Hill Rd., Louisville, GL 8-4857 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 2-3506, 2-3212 
Burke, Daniel, 1116 Maureen Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-9631. 

MA 1-7411 
Burton. John, 1302 Central, Ashland, EA 4-5964, EA 4-1111. 

Ext. 349 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 N. Timberlane Dr., Madeira, Ohio. 

LO 1-8745, WO 1-7534, (Cincinnati) 
Cain. Paul D., 1215 Corbett, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1-7248. 

AJ 1-9740 
Caldwell, Charles, 2795 Latulle Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Caiman, E. C, Jr., 1124 Washington, Sturgis, 2100, 3545 
Campbell, John J., Route 6, Fulton, 1773, 130 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, JU 

7-8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah, 444-7943 
Carroll, Thomas John, 1725 Devondale Dr., Louisville, TW 

6-8478. EM 7-6111 
Carsweil, Ernest Leon, Jr., Box 301, Boston, TE 3-4848. 

(Lebanon Junction) 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, PL 3-5367, PL 3-3245 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-8427. 

CH 1-2582 
Chattin. Ernie, 2147 Central, Ashland, EA 4-2665. EA 4-6191 
Clark, Bill W., 3839 Court Ave., Paducah, 442-2206, 444-6311 
Clark, Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 2047, 

Lexington 2-8717 
Chesher, Paul E., 5583 Bruce Ave., Louisville, EM 3-4983 
Cole, J. B., Jr., c/o Harlan Automotive, Harlan, 2753. 136 

or 1546 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr., 2554 Southview, Lexington, 7-3672, 

2-8206, 2-8919 
Collier, "J" Hamlet, Jr., 120 E. 9th St., Paris, 581 W, 401 
Corea, Frank, Box 452, Williamson, W. Va. 
Corrao, Philip J., 2321 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Indiana, WH 

4-9990, WH 4-3912 
Coudret, Raymond J., Jr., 2243 E. Iowa, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Cowan, Robert L., 645 So. W. Parkway, Louisville 11, SP 8-3360, 

SP 6-1436 
Cisco, Robert Dale, 1270 Scoville Road. Lexington, 6-5343, 

2-2656 
Grace, James, 910 Middle Dr., St. Albans, W. Va., PA 7-4779 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview Drive, Lexington, 7-4843. 6-0160 
Crager, Bobby F., Cliff, TU 6-2231 

Craig, Randy, 446 Elm St., Ludlow, AX 1-7948, GR 1-5545 
Creekmore, Lester H., 313 Center, Bellevue, JU 1-2524, JU 

1-9968 
Crosthwaite. John S., Jr., Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Virginia 

1294. 104 
Crouch, Jack J., 463 Villa Dri^e, Evansville, Indiana, GR 

6-4892 
Crum, Edward E., 2136 East Lane, Louisville 16, EM 8-8197 
Cubbon, George, 3900 Venable Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 
Gulp, Willard E., Hqts., 326 Eng. Bn., Ft. Campbell. 4048. 

4494 
Current. Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr., Lexington, 7-1049, 5-4660 
Dahlander, Ward M., 607 Indian Ridge Rd.. Louisville, TW 

5-6273, JU 5-236G 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Canter St., Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

BU 3-7255 
Daum, Charles A., 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Indiana, HA 

4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davis, Charlie, Benham, 848-2093, 848-6406 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid, Ashland, 4-7804, 6-1751 or 

4-7145 
Davis, Webster C, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959 
Deaton. Dan, Box 262, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
DeMuth, Paul E., 2242, Thistle Dawn Rd., Louisville, EM 

6-4354, JU 7-9136 
Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clay, Henderson, VA 6-4020, VA 6-3195 
Detenber, Gene, 229 Tyne Rd., Lrtjuisville, TW 5-7058 
Dial, Charles R., 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, William H., Jr., Hqs. 502nd AB 6, Ft. Campbell. 

5144, 4001 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

KI 1-2220, MA 1-9256 
Dizney, H. A., 206 4th. Corbin, 164, 1796 
Jorsey, James, 1110 Gilsey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-80511 

GR 1-6700, Ext. 367 
Dotson, W. S., 432 East 5th, Lexington, 2-5131, 4-0360 
Douglas, Harry B., 324 E. 9th Street, Belle, W. Va. 
Downey, Robert F., 327 26th St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
Drake. Richard R., 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-4235 
Duke, Jesse W.. Jr. 8422 Staghorn Dr., Louisville 7, TW 2-2117, 

BU 2-6681 
Durkin, Jack H., 291 Burke Road, Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Duty, Bill, Cline Street, Pikeville, GE 7-4718 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, GL 4-3518. GL 

2-2611 
Elkins, R. Percy, Box 288, Jenkins, 979, 58 
EUspermann, George A., 3924 Joan Ave., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-5693, HA 4-7741, Ext. 507 
Elovitz. Carl. 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington, 7-3994 
Elrod, Richard L.. Route 1, Box 114, Minford. Ohio 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ensslin, Thomas F., 160 Cochran Rd.. Lexington. 6-2965 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Ernst, Edward R., Box 68, Hebron, MU 9-7181 

Ernst. Ray C, 5156 Ballantrae Court, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

WA 1-8336 
Falls, Wm. M., Sr.. 122 Liberty St., Hopkinsville. TU 6-2436, 

TU 5-8278 
Fandrich, William, Route 4, Murray, PL 3-3193 
Farley. Kenneth, 333 Taylor Dr.. Lexington. 3-2514 
Farmer. Russell. Bailey Hill, Harlan, 2368, 750 
Faust. Jack. 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville. ME 7-2043 
Feix. Darl Wade. Webster Avenue. Cynthiana, 179 (Bus.) 
Fields, Charles A., 1690 Montgomery, Ashland 
Fields, Jerrv J.. 709 Main, Hartford. CY 8-3456, CY S-3221 
Fletcher. John L., Psych. Div. USAMRL, Ft. Knox, 2-4127 
(Bus. No.) 
Florence. Robert H., 2722 Trimble St., Paducah, 444-7489. 

444-6311, E.xt. 576 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack". 208 Granvil Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6025, 

SP 8-2731 
Fortney. Robert L., 2817 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville, GL 

8-1079. JU 2-3511, Ext. 472 
Foster, Berryman, 927 Waverly Prive, Lexington. 3-1827. 2-0515 
Freese, O. T., 5518 Mapleridge Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, EL 

1-5398, ME 1-2295 
Fugate, E. Hugh, Price, FR 7-2911, Prestonsburg TU 6-6261 
Fuller, David C, 438 HolLvwood Drive. Lexington. 6-5792 
Funkhouser. Roy A., P. O. Box 2005. New Prov. Brn.. Clarks- 

ville. Tennessee. MI 7-2473. Ft. Campbell 2422 
Gammon. William H.. 908 Highland. Ashland. EA 4-6519, 

EA 4-1111 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 2-6494 
Gibson. Fred W.. 738 1st, Henderson, VA 6-9416 
Giles. J. W.. 1043 So. 43rd. Louisville. SP 8-1976. JU 4-6355 
Gluszek. Henry, Main. Lynch. 2598 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Gour, Robert A., 233 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, 

VI 3-4334, Ext. 27 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, ED 7-3331, ED 

7-2392 
Grady, Clarence O., 430 N. Main. Marion. YO 6-3131 
Graham. Jim. 2601 Elm Street. Ashland. 4-8169 
Greene. Omar Paul. 649 N. Detroit. Xenia. Ohio. DR 2-8546, 

DR 2-0139 
Greene, Paul Dutch. 1335 Grandview Dr., Ashland, EA 4-9216, 

EA 4-6161 
Griggs. John M., 551 Freeman Dr.. Lexington, 2-7989 
Gruneisen, Sam J., 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, ME 4-9964, 

ME 5-6391 
Hadden, Newell P. JR.. 943 Wolf Run. Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan. Joseph "Red", 3000 Sherbrooke, Louisville, GL 8-1325 
Hagerman. Bart, c/o Ashland Oil, 3rd & Oak Sts. Louisville, 

ME 7-1231. ME 5-6321 
Hanes. Edward C. 1508 Ridgecrest, Bowling Green, 3-3432, 

2-0089 
Harris. David L., 188 Parkhurst Dr., Bowling Green, VI 2-0236, 

HA 3-6261 Evansville, Ind. 
Harris, John C, Plainview Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-2462 
Harris. Russell. 368 Boiling Springs. Lexington. 4-6525 
Harrod, Robert. 129 Camden Ave., Versailles, TR 3-3797, 

TR 3-3691 
Hatfield. Gene E.. Country Club Courts. Fulton. 1274. 1234 
Hawkins. Robert W., 610 Echo Lane, Madisonville, TA 1-6118, 

TA 1-2990 
Heinold, F. Thomas, 6916 Terrylynn, Cincinnati. Ohio, LI 2-1125, 

ME 1-5750 
Heinold, Jack, 5739 Weilert, Cincinnati, Ohio, LI 2-1431, 

MA 1-1901 
Heinze. Frank. 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg. TU 6-2436 
Heinze, John G., 39 Highland Ave.. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2195 
Hellard, George D., Jr.. 572 Longview Drive, Lexington. 7-2543. 

3-0484 
Hertzbergcr. Robert Harold. 2736 Marion Ave.. Evansville, 

Indiana. HA 4-1681, HA 5-6211 
Hill, Earl F., 206 Reams. London, 4-2531 
Hotlge, Don Robert, Box 173. Romney. W. Va.. 18F2I0 Romney. 

RE 8-9000. Ext. 622. Cumberland, Maryland 
Hoferer. Louis R.. 4833 Corinth. Cincinnati 37. Ohio, RE 

1-8430, WA 1-9841 
Hofstetter. Joe. Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va. 
Holbrook. William M.. 2421 Forest Ave. Ashland, 4-5850, 

4-7138 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar, Dawson Springs, SW 7-2302, 

SW 7-4241 
Holman. S. T., "Bitsy", 207 2nd Street, Corbin. 2762, 283 
Howerton, Jack, Jr.. Ridge Road, Anchorage. CH 5-8456, 

JU 7-7391 
Ruber, Carl W., 125 No. 37th Street. Louisville. SP 4-3387 
Hughes. Robert E., 400 Briggs, Russellville, PA 6-6334, 

PA 6-6335 
Huiet, F. "Whitey," 7327 Osceola Dr., Madeira 43, Ohio, Locust 

1-9239. Cherry 1-4768 
James. Gene. 315 Park Ave., Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-6976, JE 

2-7724 
Jenkins. Kean. 210 Morningside, Elizahcthtown, RO 5-4887, 

RO 6-4606 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington, 7-2883, 

2-2200. Ext. 2324 
J«hn£on. Frank W.. College Heights. Box 122, Bowling Green, 

8-8192 3-8326 
Jones, J. Carl'. 1003 S. Kentucky, Corbin, 1820, 1606 



Kathman. Bernie. 3060 Elmwood Dr.. Edgewood. S. Ft. Mitchell. 

DI 1-7369. MA 1-7541. MA 1-7542 
Kauffman. Victor C, 3635 West 8th St., Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 

WA 1-9230, MO 2-4422 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati, Ohio, WE 1-6222, 

MA 1-4380 
Kerr, Kenneth, 10806 Grafton Hall Rd., Valley Station, WE 

7-3008. JU 5-4000 
Kimble, Frank. Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
King. Allen V.. 424 Barker Rd.. Henderson. VA 6-9647. 

VA 6-3321 
Knight. James A.. Third St., Paintsville, 789-5184 
Kraesig, Charles. Route 1. Maringo, Indiana 
Kyle. Leslie G. Jr., 25 Chalfonte Place, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-8601, 

KI 1-2262 
Lamb, Billy J., P. O. Box 232, Junction City, 1420 Danville 

(Bus. No.l 
Lambert. Irvin. 5110 Rural Way. Louisville. WO 9-4718, 

GL 8-1948 
Lambert, Ken. 2221 Bayard Park Dr., Evansville, Indiana. 

GR 6-6146, HA 6-5252 
Lancaster. Morris B., 106 Penmoken Park. Lexington. 7-2955, 

6-6061 
Lawson. Carl E.. Ivy Hill. Harlan 

Lawson. Leland. 949 Deporres. Lexington. 4-1009. 2-3044 
Leightenheimer. David. 4363 Gims Road. Portsmouth. Ohio, 

EL 3-6602 
Lenahan. Thomas F.. 3107 Doreen Way. Louisville, GL 8-4490, 

JU 2-8696 
Lewis, Richard Q., Jr., 409 West 1st., Hopkinsville, TU 6-4032 
Liber. James M., 39 Gleneste Place. Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 1-3686, 

RE 1-6450 
Lloyd. Julius, 5820 Apt. "A", West Housing Area, Ft. Carson, 

Colorado, 739, 3960 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic. Louisville 7, TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401 
Lowe, Eugene T., 107 Ford Street, London, VO 4-5724, VO 

4-2207 
Lowe, Stanford, Box 337, Russellville, PA 6-6647. CY 7-6521, 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Lucas. Gene T.. 412 Cla.vton Ave.. Georgetown. 1371. 19 
Lucas, William S.. Jr., 204 Catalpa Road. Lexington, 6-2093 
McBrayer. Donald E.. 705 Williams Ave., Raceland, Park 1061, 

(Russell) 
McClaskey, Booker, Elizabethtown Road, Boston, TE 3-4726, 

4-4916 Ft. Knox 
McConachie. Byon E.. 6608 Halstead. Louisville. WO 9-9676 
McCowan, Connell, Corbin. 2361 

McGehee. Gordon, 4529 Carroll, Covington. CO 1-6880 
McGlasson. Eugene M.. 1800 Brentmoor Lane, Anchorage, 

CH 5-8554 
McHenry. Louis P. 4081:. Main. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McMullan. Cecil, Route 2. Golden Pond. WA 4-5604. WA 4-5504 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge. So. Ft. Mitchell. ED 1-3113, 

ED 1-1220 
Makepeace, Wm. "Bill", 922 Edwards Rd. Cincinnati 8. Ohio, 

East 1-4042 
Malone. Donald R.. 2530 So. 13th, Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-6224, 

JE 2-4086 
Marsili, Lee A., 1045 Gap Branch, Lynch, 848-5673 
Martin. Bill, .307 Clay, Erlanger, DI 1-8472. MA 1-0130 
Matarazzo, S. M.. 320 N. Mullblerry St.. Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-5689, 4-7019 
Mathis, Curtis W.. 109 Third St.. Harlan. 702. 1206 - 2620 
Mattingly, Hugh. 374 Hill-n-Dale. Lexington 
Mautz, Richard M., 1622 Maryland Parkway, Ashland, EA 4-8964 
Maxwell. Ray H., 310 Stocking Ave.. Sistersville. W. Va. 
Mav, E. B.. Jr.. Box 185, Prestonsburg. TU 6-2314. TU 6-8661 
Mavhew. William M.. 5755 B Allison Ave.. Fort Knox, 4-7866, 

4-5710 
Mayhugh. Robert. Cherrywood Dr., Elizabethtown, RO 5-2898, 

RO 5-6187 
Mayo, Henry L., 581 College St.. Paintsville, 789-4465, 

789-4001 
Meeks. Jack. 407 5th St.. Corbin, 416, 561 
Melmige, James, Matewan. W. V., HA 7-2861. HA 6-4401 
Mercke. Frank R.. 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, TW 6-8460, 

ME 4-9491 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, BI 1-3469, 

PA 1-4334 
Millerhaus, W. J., 923 Harris, Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-7622 
Minton, Eugene H., 313 13th St.. Henderson. VA 7-3193 
Mitchell. Emmett, 284 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 6-3511, 4-0032 
Mitchell. Vyron W., 901 Walnut Street. Fulton. 1648, 30 
Moore, Pete, College St., Barbourville, 6-3549 
Moran. Warren Carl. 3104 Horton Ave.. Louisville 20. GL 8-6178, 

SP 2-3661 
Mordica. William A.. 800 Edgewodo Ave.. Ashland. EA 4-7741 
Morris. Gene. 302 Wilson Court. Huntington. W. Va. 
Morrissey. Rockne. 4824 Harlou. Dayton 32. Ohio, CL 4-4396, 

CL 3-9101 
Moss, Howard A., Box 1042, Paducah. 898-3168. 442-4474 
Moss. James W., 609 Henry Clay Blvd.. Lexington, 5-0772, 

6-0772 
Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd., Madisonville, TA 1-4864, 

TA 1-2644 
MuUins, Bobby E.. Box 470, Paintsville, 789-4610, 789-4660 
Muntan, Peter J., 126 Woodmore Ave., Louisville 14, EM 8-8236, 
ME 7-7621 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Page Seven 



Mussman. Ralph, 502 Monroe, Newport, JU 1-4562, CO 1-1300 

Myers, Lee E., P. O. Box 46, Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 

Neal, Gene, Davis Pike, Route 1, Batavia, Ohio, SK 3-590S, 

AV 1-4630 
Noland, Douglas, Herndon, Stanford, FO 5-2609, FO 5-2619 
Nord, Bertrand J., 1523 Hoertz, Louisville, ME 4-9065, ME 

4-0561 
Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401, 

Ext. 202 
Nord, Gilbert. 6315 Krause, Louisville 16, WA 1-5363 
Okrueh, Nicholas, 401 E. Parkland, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-3740, HA 4-3331, Ext. 324 
Omer, Billy W., Reed Ave., Madisonville. TA 1-2833 
O'Nan. Norman. Elmwood Drive, Henderson, 7-3968, 7-3434 
O'Neal. Bud, 1767 Harvard Dr., Louisville, GL 8-7940, TU 5-6765 
Osborne, Kenneth, Morehead State College, Box 261, Morehead 
Osborne. Ted G., Box 806, Lexington. 6-8390 
Overby, H. E., 1913 11th Ave. N., Nashville, Tennessee. 

AI 6-1310, AI 6-4742 
Palmer, Carl A.. 2506 So. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Parker. Bill E., Box 731, Pineville, ED 7-3293 
Parkhurst. David S., 5432A Gilkey Street, Ft. Knox, 4-1465, 

4-6938 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence, MO 7-2524, TA 1-9004 
Pate, Lloyd Whitefield, 1011 Joyce Lane, Nashville 6. Tenn- 
essee, CO 2-2916. TW 5-5472 
Peden, Harlan, 206 Garmon, Glasgow 

Pence. William. 6354 G. Kelly St.. Ft. Knox, 4-1690, 4-1265 
Perry, L. J.. 438 So. St.. Lynch, 848-5941 

Piper. James K.. 597 Rosemill Dr., Lexington. 7-3340, 2-9341 
Poore, William E.. Hazard, GE 6-2484, GE 6-4523 
Powell, Logan. 817 Delia Dr.. Lexington. 5-1653, 2-3255 
Prior, Lowell F.. 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

EL 3-0700. EL 3-6129 
Pullen. Robert. 2655 Piedmont Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Raisor, J. T.. 990 Fredericksburg Rd.. Lexington. 7-1043. 4-0304 
Rapp. William. 215 Heplar St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-1983, 

JE 2-7242 
Ratliff, Jerry R., 15th Street, Williamsburg 
Ray. Shirley, Owensboro. MU 3-7653 
Reddington. Jim. 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville 13, GL 2-9689, 

SP 8-4421 
Reece, Fred, 149 Elm St., Versailles, TR 3-3623, Lexington 

7-3977 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft, Thomas, HI 1-4946, 

KI 1-4507. LI 2-4507 
Rieman, Bob, 2004 Dallas Ave., Cincinnati 39. Ohio, JA 2-3694, 

JA 1-0800 
Reinhart. Gene. 4813 Sweetser. Evansville. Indiana. GR 7-3919 
Renfro, John E., 445 Florance, Williamsburg, 6488. 4391-2721 
Rentz. Thomas W.. 161 Chenault Rd.. Lexington, 6-8242, 3-2880 
Rhatigan, Alfred J., 10663 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio 

PR 1-2479, EL 1-6400 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2691. Williamson. W. Va. 
Riggs. William T., 103 W. McElroy St., Morganfield, 170, 

Henderson VA 7-9894 
Rogers, J. B,, 832 12th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th Street, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-4036, 

JE 2-3231 
Russell, Charles B.. Jr.. 61 Main, Lynch, 848-2301 
Rudolph, Fred. Jr.. 5600 Jeanine Dr.. Louisville, WO 9-3013, 

ME 6-7441 
Russell, Joe, Orchard Drive. Russellville. PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
Sabato, AI, 7621 View Place Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, VA 1-3646, 

CA 1-6800 
Sacra, Gresham. 920 Parley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2200, 

Ext. 3217 
Sallee. Alan L., 1737 Deer Park Ave., Louisville, GI 1-6478 
Sanders. Mel. 3910 Sunset. Paducah, 442-3660, 442-2092 
Sauter, Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville, GL 1-5453, 

EM 8-3381, Ext. 231 and 269 
Saylor. Deward. Box 407, Wallins Creek. MO 4-3594, MO 4-3444 
Saylor, Emanuel, Box 265, Loyall, 1140, 2620 
Schad. James E., 10717 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-5495 
Scharfenberger, Irv T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

LO 1-6378, LO 1-6378 
Schlich, Paul E., 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville, GL 8-6766, 

TW 6-0211 
Schmitt, Karl F,, 710 E, Walnut, Louisville 
Scott, Luther. 211 Spruce, Murray. PL 3-4649 
Scott. W. L.. 1816 McDonald. Lexington, 2-3316, 2-3595 
Scale, Frank E.. 1001 Tates Creek Rd,. Lexington, 6-8545 
Scale, William E., 1001 Tates Creek Rd., Lexington, 6-8545 
Shanks. 3210 Ainslie Way, Louisville, GL 2-9513, JU 4-1361, 

Ext. 474 
Shaw, John H.. 219 E. Lee. Mayfield. CH 7-1907 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th St. Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

GR 1-1100, Mu 1-3510 
Sheets, William, Holland Heights, Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662, 1240 
Sinclair, George H., 7807 Joyce Dr., Louisville, WO 9-7926, 

ME 7-7621 Ext. 228 



■e. Dewey, 1110 Forrest Ct.. Ashland, EA 5-3902, EA 

4-2144 
Skinner, Earnest, 206 Pine Street, Murray, PL 3-3893 
Sloan. Wally, 419 Oread Road, Louisville, TW 5-1126, TW 

7-2554 



Smith. J. E,. 1008 S. Western Parkway, Louisville, SP 4-2718, 

SP 4-2718 
Smith, Walter K., 1722 Melvin Circle, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

JA 1-9774, MU 1-3100 
Smithson, Richard A., 428 6th Street, Bowling Green, VI 2-6564 
Snook, Patrick. 3606 St. Germaine, Louisville, TW 3-3703. 

JU 2-1601 



Spaulding. Stan, 434 Gordon, Waverly. Ohio, gl6-M. 51 

Steele, Charles S., 643 Main St., Lynch, 848-5972 

Steinke Donald F., 8001. Granville, Lane Cincinnati, JA 2-1606, 

KI 1-9646 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stevens, Wm. D., 1033 Claiborne Way, Lexington, 6-2578, 

2-2220, Ext. 3209 
Stewart, Herbert T., 323 Deaton, Hazard, GE 6-2438, GE 

6-9941 
Stone. Robert E., Georgia Ave., Pineville 
Strimer, Albert, 2610 Broad St., Parkersburg. W. Va. 
Strong Arnett, 425 Cedar. Hazard. GE 6-3938. GE 6-2141 
Stump, Bennett, 2501 Grand Ave,, Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Sullivan, Don C, Prestonsburg, 886-2144, Frankfort CA 3-8221, 

Ext. 61 
Swinford. John, Box 110, Cynthiana, 205, 1887 
Taylor, Dennis H,. 1406 Hughes Ave.. Murray. PL 3-4825, 

PL 3-6125 
Thomas, Frank M., 620 So. 10th St., Louisville, JU 7-0441, 

JU 4-9178 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, GL 2-9265 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr., 1310 Rammers Ave., Louisville, 

ME 4-3617. JU 4-5311 
Thompson. Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, BL 1-3394, 

WA 1-0047 
Thurman, J. W.. Manchester, LY 8-3462, LY 8-3737 
Timmering, George E.. 28 Welby Rd.. Louisville, WA 1-2148 
Trautwein, Jim, 4313 Martha, Louisville 20, GL 8-7438, 

GL 4-3449 
Treas. Joe W.. 609 Green. Fulton. 1056, 41 
Ti-unzo, Nicholas P.. 1015 Elaine Dr., Louisville, WO 9-7735, 

GL 4-7511, Ext. 3012 
Vance. Wendell. 130 Whirlaway. Lyndon, TW 5-6618. CH 6-4121 
Vankirk. Alvia S,, 107 S. Poplar. Corbin. 1646, 146 
Van Meter, David G.. 3148 Talisman Rd., Louisville, GL 4-4030 
VanMeter, John W., Jr., 1933 Olive St., Louisville, SP 8-6032, 

SP 6-4627 
Vennari. Paul. Box 13. Beckley. W. Va, 
Varner, Ray. 3169 Hyde Park Dr., Lexington, 7-6029, 6-4224, 

Sta. 210 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Waide, Harry D.. 601 Princeton St., Providence, MO 7-6563. 

MO 7-2055 
Walker, Paul R., City Hall, Bowling Green, VI 3-8893, VI 3-8326 
Wanchic, Nicholas, USPHS Hospital, Lexington, 5-1233, 

2-8328 
Watson, Ronald L., 409 Northwood Dr., Bedford, Indiana, 

BR 9-1875, BR 9-1605 
Watts. Shirley R.. 802 Carneal Rd., Lexington, 5-2743, 2-5494 
Weaver. Ray. 56 Thompson Ave., So. Ft. Mtichell, ED 1-3741, 

CH 1-2341 
Webb. James G.. 1480 Central Ave., Barboursville, W. Va. 
Weber. David, 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville, TW 6-4298 
Weisbrodt. Paul E., 837 Sherwood. Lexington, 7-3924. 7-3457 
Welch. Tom, 3932 Vine Vista Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 

1-8094. GA 1-5700. Ext. 691 
Werkowitz. Jack, 4614 Miller Rd., Blue Ash 42, Ohio, SY 1-5382 
Wheeler, Jim, 208 Bridge, Paintsville, 789-3839, 789-4511 
White, Harlie. Jr., Route 5, Thompkinsville, HU 7-3193, 

HU 7-5617 
White. James E., Main St.. Lynch, 858-6608 
Wigginton, AI. Sr., 1605 Windsor Place. Louisville. GL 1-3260 

SP 6-7881 
Williams. Bert. 988 DePorre Ave.. Lexington, 4-0939. 2-2626 
Williams, Roy E., 304 Deepwood Dr., R.R. 3, Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-4831 
Wilson, Jack R., 617 West Main St., Morehead, ST 4-5524, 

ST 4-4443 
Wilson, John Pope, 812 Main St., Louisville 6, JU 6-4591, 

TW 6-0211 
Winfrey. Shelby, 108 Holly, Berea, 805 
Wise, Billy. 2112 St. Teresa. Lexington, 6-7449. 2-5494 
Wise, Jack, 408 Fountain Ave., Georgetown, 2062, Sadieville 

2071 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb Street, Henderson, VA 6-4526 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-0626, 

DU 1-1232 
Zimmer, Thomas W.. 3530 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 

DI 1-4566, HE 1-4272 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K. H. S. A. A.— 1960 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Donald K., 222 W. Hickman St., Winchester, PI 4-1199, 

PI 4-5626 
Adkins, Raymond C. 622 Amanda Furnace Drive, Ashland, 

EA-4-7229 
Adkins, Wendell L., Wallins Creek, P. O. Box 67, MO-4-3544 

MO-4-3444 
Akridge, Dean, Fredonia, 4801, 4432 
Alexander, Rex E., 1320 Well's Bldg., Murray, PL 3-3579, 

PL 3-2310 - Extension 236 
Alford. William C, Poplar Ridge Road, Alexandria, MY 7-2462. 

MY 7-8221 
Allen, Jack R. Rt. No. 3. Bardstown. 8-8294, 8-3227 
Almon. James H.. 187 1st St., Lynch. 848-5942 
Ahves. Donald R.. Rt. No. 2, Box 147C. Valley Station, 

WE 7-6348. WE 7-2300 
Arnold. Kenneth, 9606 Seatonville Rd., Fern Creek, CE 9-5445 
Atwell, Bobby Ray, 1201 Short St., Louisville. EM 8-0965 
Baker. James E., 205 Highland Ave.. Monticello, FI 8-5341, 

FI 8-2331 
Baker, Robert M.. Jr.. 411 Jean Drive, Danville, 1449, 2385 
Ballaban, Thomas, 4139 St. Lawrence Ave., Cincinnati 5, 

BL 1-0962, PO 1-7600 
Barker, Walter D., Rt. No. 5, Box 218, Portemouth, Ohio, 

UL 8-2770. EL 3-5329 
Bankemper, Thomas, 317 E. 7th St., Newport. JU 7-5097 
Barlow, Bill. 347 Linden Walk. Lexington, 2-3277 
Barlow, Billy, 3050 Lynnwood Dr., Paris, 63 T, Lexington 

2-2220 - Ex. 2263 
Barton. W. Walter, Rt. No. 2. Box 12, Corbin. Ky., 1432M, 9144 
Baskin, Sylvester, 214 West St., Lynch, 848-5637 
Batie, Calvin, Union St., Madisonville, TA 1-5942 
Bell. Henry Burnett, 110 Ft. Thomas. Lexington. 2-5961, 6-3126 
Bell, Henrv Burnett, 110 Ft. Thomas, Lexington, 2-6861, 6-3126 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 7124 
Benedict. Johnny. Virgie. Virgie 12 

Bennett. Gene. Wheelersburg, Ohio, PR 6-2655, GL 6-4191 
Bentlev, James, Shelby Gap 

Beringer, William F.. 907 Maple Ave., Dayton, CO 1-7152 
Berrv, William F.. 1633 Jackson, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6765 
Bibb! William C, 24161.. st. Ann, Owensboro, MU 3-8973, 

MU 4-5261 
Bishop, David G.. Decoursey Pike, Morning View, PL 7-2320, 

CO 1-3642 
Black. William A.. Brookport. Illinois 

Blackburn. Viley O., 210 College, Somerset, 678-8986, 678-8171 
Blankenship. Zeb. Rt. No. 6, Richmond, 2229M, 583 
Blanton, Leonard, 2117 Washington St., Flatwoods, Grand 1352 
Boehm, Robert R., 2233 Bath Ave., Ashland, EA 4-2347, 

EA 4-6641 
Boggs, Janis H., Webbville 
Bohan. Jim, 5943 Oak Apple Dr., Cincinnati 11, Ohio, 

MO 1-1001, ME 1-0010 
Bowling, Rav, Rt. No. 1. Box 6, London, VO 4-4784 
Bowman. Earl G. 'Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr.. Le.xington, 

6-8111. 2-3343 
Bradshaw. Frank. 2166 E. Gum, Evansville, Indiana, GR 6-6995, 

HA 5-6211 
Braughler. David L.. Box 162, Dry Ridge, TA 3-1751, JE 1-6214 

Cincinnati. Ohio 
Breeden. Charles, Mt. Washington. KE 8-4897 
Brewer. Randell. Box 73. London, VO 4-6608, VO 4-2107 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct.. Cincinnati 24, Ohio, KI 1-6049, 

PA 1-1984 
Briscoe. Hubert, Rt. No. 3. Shelbyville, ME 3-4669, ME 3-2543 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Brooks, Jerry M., 314 S. Main St., Versailles, TR 3-3161 (Bus.) 
Brown. Donald W., Box 66. Cayce. 2431 
Brown, Doyle Eugene, 310 W. Lexington Ave., Winchester, 

PI 4-5338, PI 4-2243 
Brown, Thomas, 3598 Kenoak Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, EL 1-6532, 

RE 1-7360 
Browning. William H.. Rt. No. 2, Box 113, Lebanon, 790-W 
Brugh Walter J., So. Mayo Trail. Paintsville. 789-3698, 789-4311 
Brumfield. Bernard R.. 123 Preston Ct.. Versailles 
Brummett. Joe, 519 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 2921, 1900 Ext. 26 
Bryan. William B.. Rt. No. 4. Paris, 4228. 4264 
Bryant, Thomas H., 1428 Rhonda Way, Louisville, EM 8-797G, 

GL 1-4432 
Buis, Nathaniel, Liberty. SA 7-3471, SA 7-28.52 
Bunnell, K. L., Buckner at 3rd, Munfordville, JA 4-3361. 

JA 4-2.321 
Burdette, Wally M.. 1514 Oleanda Ave.. l,ouisviIle, EM 6-6559 
Burkley. Bud. 8123 Patton Dr., Indianapolis, Indiana, LI 6-5725, 

LI 6-5724 
Burnham. Carl H.. 313 N. Mulberry. Elizabethtown, RO 6-4049 
Burns, Ronnie, Box 146, Lynch, 848-5762 
Burrows. Walter. Jr., 712 No. 37th St.. Paducah, 443-3336, 

443-5376 
ButtB. Delbert L., 107 Sterling, Mt. Sterling, 1313, 684-R 



Butner. William M., Rt. No. 2, Lancaster, 628-R, 612-K 

Byers. Layman, Welchs Creek 

Byrd. Harry G.. 7331 N. Timberlane Dr., Madeira, Ohio, 

LO 1-8745, WO 1-7534 Cin. Ohio 
Cain. Paul D., 1215 Corbett, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1-7246. 

AJ 1-9740 
Campbell, French. Box 356. Allen. TR 4-2266 
Canter. John. 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, 

JU 7-8862 
Carr, Martin L., 315 Highland Ave., Cynthiana. 781-J 
Carnes. Richard. 110 Plenty. New Richmond, Ohio. RI 2-4172 
Cash. Randall E.. 4504 Janice Way, Louisville, EM 7-8714, 

EM 3-2424 
Cassady. Richard. Rt. No. 1, Rockfield. VI 2-3544. VI 3-9078 
Casteel. Ralph. East Bernstadt, VI 3-2730, VI 3-2730 
Gates, Thomas H.. Benjamin Terrace, Providence, MO 7-5625 
Cathey. Gene S.. 1415 Vine St., Murray, PL 3-5367, PL 3-3245 
Chambers. William Virgil. 251 North Third. Danville, 2543 
Chattin. Ernie. 2147 Central Ave.. Ashland, EA 4-2664, 

EA 4-6191 
Clarkston. Glenn, 226 May St.. Harlan. 1565-W 
Coffey. Kenneth B., Berea. 154-J, 880 
Coleman. L. J. "Duke", Jr.. 2554 Southview. Lexington. 7-3672. 

2-8205. 2-8919 
Colgan. Donald L. 424 Mt. Carmel Ave., Flemingsburg, VI 

6-3671, VI 5-6511 
Collins, Bob. Rt. No. 1. Elkton 

Collins, Johnnie Hubert, US 52471704, Hq. 2d Msl. Bn, 67th 

Artv. Ellsworth Air Force Base, S. D. FI 3-3988, 

FI 2-2400 Ext 202 

Collins, Larry. 3148 Beech. Covington. AX 1-8616. ME 1-0010 

Combs. Keith Allen, 1301 MacArthur Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-2869, HA 5-2215 
Combs, William E.. Jr.. 1300 MacArthur Dr., Evansville, 

Indiana, GR 7-4277, HA 3-4436 
Conley, George D.. 2436 Roosevelt Ave.. Ashland, EA 4-6042 
Conley, Ted L., 3227V' Walters Hill Dr., Ashland, EA 4-2912, 

EA 4-6343 
Conn, John D., Western Ky. St. College. Bowling Green 
Conway. James M.. 113 Phillips St., Frankfort. CA 7-4268, 

CA 7-2206 
Cooper, John F.. Rt. No. 2. Foster, PL 6-4608 
Cooper, John Wellington, P. O. Box 322. Danville. 2090-J, 9102 
Cossey, James Zelner, P. O. Box 67. Cadiz. LA 2-8146 
Corrao, Philip J., 2321 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Indiana. 

WH 4-9990, WH 4-3912 
Coryell, Francis W.. 616 W. Southern Heights, Louisville, 

EM 3-5892, JU 4-3211 
Coudret, Raymond J., Jr., 2243 E. Iowa, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Courtney, Walt, 110 Gowdy. Campbellsville, 150-M 
Covington. Ralph. 122 Royal Spring, Georgetown, 1359-J 
Cox, Charles Glenn, 326 S. Morgan, Morganfield, 160 
Crager, Bobby F.. Cliff, TU 6-2231 
erase. Arvil, P. O. Box 453 C.P.O., Berea, 483 
Creekmore, Ken, 501 Monticello St.. Somerset, 678-4059, 

678-4621 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr.. Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Va„ 1294, 

104 
Crutcher. James W., 3210 Cawein Way, Louisville, GL 8-6830, 

EM 6-5688 
Culp. Willard E.. Hqts. 326th Eng. Bn., Ft. Campbell, 4048, 

4494 
Cummins, Albert B.. 3974 Mantell Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

SY 1-1536, PO 1-4100 Ext. 3352 
Cunningham, Julian R.. Mt. Sterling, 1055-J3, 1500 
Dalton, Ray H.. 4707 Dohn Rd., Louisville, EM 6-8066 
Dame. L. J.. 604 Ridgewood. Owensboro. MU 4-5681 
Daum. Charles A., 216 Christ Rd.. Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davis, Dwight R. Jr.. 3516 Hycliffe Ave.. Louisville. TW 6-7302, 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 7179 
Davis. Harold T.. Rt. No. 3. Beaver Dam 
Davis, Ralph E.. 1007 Front St., Vanceburg, SW 6-4601, 

SW 6-2521 
Deaton. Charles, 1103 Riverview. Pikeville. GE 7-6923, GE 7-6870 
Denton, Charles M.. 1427 Clay, Henderson, VA 6-4020, VA 6-3196 
DeVary, Bill. P. O. Box 404. Middlesboro. 1587 
Dierolf, William H., Jr., Hqs. 502nd AB 6, Ft, Campbell, 

5144, 4001 
Dieterle, Owen M.. 907 West Second. Owensboro, MU 3-7610 
DiMuzio, Robert M.. 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

KI 1-2220, MA 1-9256 
Divine. Ralph. Rt. No. 1, Bremen, 988-M-2 (Central City) 
Dixon, Kenneth. 268 Turner Ave., Irvine. 723-2366 
Dodge. Bruce B.. Jr.. 203 N. Clifton, Louisville, TW 5-1088, 

JR 3-4441 
Dodson, Winston, 213 Greenbrier Road. Lexington, 7-2598, 2-5650 
Dolan, Michael B., Jr.. 168 Lincoln. Lexington. 6-4034. 5-4660 
Dorsey. James, 1110 Gilsey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-8060 
Dotson. John B.. Rt. No. 1, Harrisburg, Illinois, CL 3-6971, 

CL 3-7951 
Dotson. W. S.. 432 East 5th St., Lexington, 2-5131, 4-0350 
Doyle, Donald, 229 Risen Ave.. Campbellsville. 211-M. 231 
Drake. Richard R., 61 Edwanls Ct.. Ft. Thomas, HI 1-4235 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 650 S. 44th St.. Louisville 11, SP 8-5943 
Duerson, Guy K.. Jr.. Richmond Rd.. Berea. 285. 184 
Duncan. James H.. Rt. No. 2, Russellville, PA 6-6767, VI 3-9245 
Durkin, Jack H.. 291 Burke Rd., Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Dyer. Joe R., Rt. No. 2, Kirksey, HU 9-2187 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Page Nine 



Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Edwards, Donald A., Main St., Sebree, TE 5-7537, TE 5-7592 
Elkins, R. Percy, P. O. Box 288, Jenkins, 979, 58 
Ellington, James E., P. O. Box 841, Hazard, GE 6-3648 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington, 7-3994 
Elrod, W. T., 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, VI 2-5110. VI 3-4334 
E.Tibry, Chalmer P., Dr., 1518 Stop n' Shop Ct., Owensboro, 

MU 3-2131, MU 3-3214 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St.. Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., P. O. Box 68, Hebron, MU 9-7181 
Fairchild, Gene P., 3617 Clinton Rd., Paducah, 443-4385, 

442-4001 
Farmer. Russell, Bailey Hill, Harlan, 2368, 750 
Feher, A. J., 214 Fields St., Cumberland, 689-4061 Cumberland, 

848-6431 Lynch 
Feix, Jimmie, 2110 Cabell Dr., Bowling Green, VI 3-9635, 

VI 3-4334, Ext. 22 
Ferguson. Ford, Rt. No. 2, Waverly, Ohio 

Ferrell, Doc T., 409 Greenbrier, Lexington, 7-4273, 4-0301 
Fields. Jerry J., 709 Main, Hartford. CY 8-3466, CY 8-3221 
Fields, Joe D., Rt. No. 1, Gilbertsville. FO 2-4965 
Fisher, Larry J., Chinnsbranch Rd., Wurtland, Oak 943, 

ARMCO 323 
Flaugher, Allen, Rt. No. 1, Brooksville, REP. 5-2924, CO 1-5620 
Ford, Gary P., 407 N. Main St., Ashland City, Tenn.. SW 2-4136 
Foster. Berryman. 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington. 3-1827, 2-0515 
Foster, William R., Stanford St., Science Hill, 423-8683, 678-8161 
Francis, George, Sassafras. GE 6-3436 
Franklin, Robert. W. Carlisle, Marion, 5-4650, 5-4226 
Freese, O. T., 5518 Mapleridge Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, EL 1-5398, 

ME 1-2295 
Fugate, E. Hugh, Price, FR 7-2911, TU 6-6261 Prestonsburg 
Fuller, John R., Jr., Rt. No. 4, Paducah, 989-3115, 443-5626 
Cast, Joseph H., 3812 Chatham Rd., Louisville, GL 8-7330 
Gentry, Charles C, Rt. No. 1, Oak Grove, ID 1-3405, IL 1-3810 
Gerding, James, 1007 Patterson, Newport, AX 1-5152, HI 1-0169 
Gettler, John F., 706 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 2-6494 
Gilbert Gerald L.. Tunnel Hill Rd., Elizabethtown, 4-6914 

Ft. Knox (Bus.) 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", 208 Southern Dr., Campbellsville, 

737-R, 386 
Giordano, Al, 107 Ratliff St., Princeton, EM 5-5680, EM 5-5615 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Golden, Leonard T., 617 Main St., Lynch, VI 8-2512 
Goley, Jim, 31 Wallace, Florence, AT 3-2812, AX 1-5447 
Gour, Robert A., 233 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, 

VI 3-4334, Ext. 27 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 3-4016, GR 6-6191 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, ED 7-3331, ED 7-7392 
Greene, Omar Paul, 649 N. Detroit, Xenia, Ohio, Drake 2-8646, 

Drake 2-0139 
Griffith, Edwin Dale, 1134 Sexton Ct., Ashland, EA 4-2497, 

EA 4-1156, Ext. 474 or 475 
Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 606 Perry Ave., Hazard, GE 6-3053, 

GE 6-4541 
Gustafson, Al, Jr., 248 Francis Bldg., Louisville, GL 4-6151, 

JU 4-2058 
Hadden. Newell P.. 942 Wolf Run, Lexington, 6-5332, 2-7866 
Hagan. Joseph "Red", 3000 Sherbrooke, Louisville, GI 8-1325 
Hall. Monroe, Jr., Belfry, EL 3-7937, BE 5-2323 
Hamblin, Raymond, Jackson 
Hamilton, Walter. 434 Bauer Ave., Louisville, TW 3-5172, 

JU 7-1121, Ex. 309 
Hamm, Harold D., Rt. No. 1, Frankfort, CA 7-9800 
Hancock, Jackie R., Rt. No. 3, Sebree, TU 4-4131 
Harrell, Bill D., Webbmont, Shelbyville 
Hargis, Bobby S., P. O. Box No. 3, Calvert City, EX 6-4849, 

EL 6-4181 
Harper. Robie, Jr., Beechmont, Drakesboro GR 6-2264 
Hatfield, Dennis, 1610 May St., Covington, HE 1-4234, 

MA 1-6675 
Hatter, Jack, 1654 Amsterdam Ed., Covington, ED 1-2444, 

DU 1-4900 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, MA 3-3641, MA 3-9111 
Hendon, L. J., 106 S. 12th St., Murray. PL 3-3668, PL 3-2825 
Herold, Clarence E., Rt. No. 1, Sacramento 
Hertzberger, Robert H., 2735 Marion Ave., Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 4-1681, HA 5-2611 
Hewitt, Raymond T., Sharp Street, Murray, PL 3-5435, 

PL 3-2310, Ext. 260 
Hibbs, Eugene M., 109 E. Arch, Madisonville, TA 1-6811, 

TA 1-6811 
Hicks, Don, Rt. No. 1, Boaz 
Hicks, Floyd E., 404 E. 19th St., Covington, HE 1-1125, 

RE 1-2121, Line 250 
Hodge, Don Robert. P. O. Box 173, Romney, W. Va., 18F-210 

Romney, RE 8-9000, Ex. 622, Cumberland, Md. 
Hodge, Fred, 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville. Indiana, GR 7-2993, 

HA 4-6411 
Hoferer, Louis R., 4833 Corinth, Cincinnati 37, Ohio, RE 1-8430, 

WA 1-9841 
Holbrook, Arthur, Leatherwood 
Holeman, Bill R., P. O. Box 433, Manchester, LY 8-2289, 

LiY 8-2289 
Holmes. Don, 604 Sanderson Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 5-5479 
Holmes, Robert D., 500 East Locust, Princeton, 5-5129, 5-2028 
Hook, Burnley B., Rt. No. 5, Paducah, 443-4610 
Horton, John, Lyons Apis., Monticello, FI 8-2311 (Bus.) 



Howard, Henry D., Kettle Island, 7-3751, 7-2996 

Howard, Oscar D.. P. O. Box 93-E, Rt. No. 1, Corbin, 9167, 

(Bus.) 
Huggins, Jim. 361 Sumpter, Bowling Green, VI 2-5519 
Huiet, F. "Whitey", 7327 Oscela Dr., Maderia 42, Ohio, Locust 

1-9239, Cherry 1-4768 
Hunley, Neil P.. 386 Main St., West Liberty, SH 3-3131, 

SH 3-3705 
Hulsey, Donald R., 3011 W. Virginia, Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 5-3677, WO 3-3124 
Hurst, David E., P. O. Box 453, Middlesboro. 707, 263 
Hutchinson, Jack, Martin, BU 5-3427 
Hyatt, Bob, 3406 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville, GL 1-7302, 

JU 7-8611 
Hyland, F. D. "Dick", P. O. Box 465, South Webster, Ohio, 

PR 8-2401, 5-100 Waverly, Ohio 
Hvnson. Fred R., 441 Kingsway, Lexington, 6-4285, 6-4285 
Inman. Briscoe, Centre College, Danville, 3075, 1900, Ex. 26 
Irwin, Charlie, Rt. No. 4. Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Jackson, Roy T., College St., Sebree, 2566 (Bus.) 
James, Gene, 315 Park Ave., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976, 

JE 2-7724 
James, William V., 2812 Chippewa Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-6352 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4887, 

RO 5-4606 
Jennings. Joseph L., 348 Bonnie Leslie, Bellevue, HI 1-1532, 

DU 1-2000. Line 562 
Johnson, Charles W., Virgie, 28 

Johnson, Joe R., 106 S. 3rd, Central City, 947-R, 947-J 
Johnson. John Luther, P. O. Box 321, Virgie 
Johnson, Frank W., College Heights, Box 122. Bowling Green, 

3-8192, 3-8326 
Johnson, Vernon Lee. Jr., Highway 27, Falmouth. OL 4-5771, 

OL 4-5771 
Johnson, Walter, P. O. Box 397, Grayson, GR 4-4689. GR 4-6581 
Johnson, William Bernard, Rt. No. 7, Hopkinsville, AM 9-2208, 

TU 5-6366 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 507 M, 184 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, 

GR 8-1293 
Jordan, Ken, 104 W. Orchard. Fort Mitchell, ED 1-2747, 

GA 1-3100 
Junker, Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour, Cincinnati 16, Ohio, 

VA 1-4117, VA 1-2322 
Kasperski, Harry W.. 2200 Plantation Dr., Louisville SPR 

5-6658, JUN 4-1361, Ex. 404 
Kazee, William W. "Bill", 2613 Hampton St., Ashland, 

EA 4-7732 
Keene, Marcum, Biggs 
Kercher, Norman Lee, 2505 Proctor Knott, Louisville, GL 2-2969, 

GL 8-4729 
Kessler, Robert H., 1620 Oleanda Ave., Louisville, EM 6-3780, 

SP 8-5531 
Key. Calvin, Hazel, HY 2-3431, HY 2-2341 
Kidd, Roy, 116 Long-view Dr., Richmond, 1703, 683 
Kiefer, Steve. 132 Lake. Bellevue, CO 1-3807. CO 1-3807 
King, Bob, 119 S. 39th St., Louisville. SP 8-4660 
King. James A., 720 S. 43rd St. Louisville, SP 8-3690, SP 6-2466 
King, Lee Parr, Wolf Creek, GY 7-3422 
King, John J., Jr., 3610 Brendenwood Rd., Valley Station, 

WE 7-7239. ME 4-8311 
Kinman, Joe T., Roselawn, Williamstown. 4-6641, 4-6541 
Knight, Bill, 762 N. 36th St., Paducah, 44-32775, 44-32775 
Kremer, Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade Rd., Louisville, GL 4-3991, 

JU 7-0026 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Fleming, 7726 
Lambert, Ken, 2221 Bayard Park Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6146, HA 5-6252 
Lance, Walter, 2319 Maple St., Owensboro, MU 3-3974, MU 

3-1591 
Lane. Jack, Bee Spring. LY 7-3685, LY 7-3960 
Lankert, Norman E., 307 N. Sherwood, Clarksville, Indiana, 

BU 2-3368 
Laskey, George O., Box 7, Williamstown, TA 3-2041 
Laubheimer, Donald T., 5127 Johnsontown Rd., Valley Station, 

WE 7-6840. JU 4-2685 
Lawrence, Alvin L.. 21 Alta Vista. Walton, HU 5-4643, 

DU 1-2000, Line 487 
Lawson, Leland, 949 DePorres, Lexington, 4-1009, 2-3044 
Lazarus. Rhea P., 1903 Nashville Road, Bowling Green. 

VI 3-8398 
Lee, Robert L., 217 Ridgeway Ave., Louisville 7, TW 5-6497, 

TW 5-2431 
Lehkamp, Kenneth H., 749 S. Ft. Thomas, Ft. Thomas, 

HI 1-1476. MY 7-8181 
Levan, T. F., P. O. Box 31, Benton, LA 7-3221, LA 7-4621 
Liles, Bill Sr., 1137 A Elmdale Road, Paducah, 442-8180, 

898-2441 
Little. Ronnie, Pomeroyton, SO 8-3345, SO 8-3345 
Littlepage, Pryce, 22 Midway Ave., Madisonville. TA 1-1642 
Lloyd, Julius, 6820 Apt. A, West Housing Area, Ft. Carson, 

Colo., 739, 3960 (Ft. Carson, Colo.) 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln Ave., LouiSv,ille, ME 7-3192. 

SP 6-3921 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville, TW 6-8731, ME 5-5211 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville 7, TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401 
Looney, Dick, Pikeville, GE 7-6410 
Loudy, Kenneth, Slemp, OR 5-4278 

Lowe, Eugene T., 107 Ford St., London, VO 4-5724, VO 4-2207 
Lucas, Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave., Georgetown, 1371, 19 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Lucas, William S.. Jr.. 204 Catalpa Rd., Lexington, 6-2093 

L.vkins. Joe Daniel, Malone. SH 3-2428 

Lyons, Charles. Rt. No. 2. Sharpsburg, CH 7-2457 

Lvtle. William Price. 1634'.. Carter Ave., Columbus, Georgia, 

FA 3-3774, MU 9-5180 
MoAnelly. David F., 375 Sheridan Dr.. Lexington, 7-6610 
McBee, William K., 76 Elwood Ave., Burlington, JH 6-6462, 

HE 1-7290 
McBraver, Donald E., 705 Williams Ave., Raceland, Park 1061 
McCowan. Connell, Corbin, 2361 
McCoy, Havse, P. O. Box 265, Inez 
McDonald, Leslie L., P. O. Box 192, Greenville, 495-M, 1000 

Central City 
McGhee, Gordon, 4529 Carroll, Covington, CO 1-6880 
McGlasson. Galen, 212 North Bend Rd., Hebron, MU 9-7330, 

MU 9-7330 
McGlone, Maurice Baxton, Rt. No. 2. Box 95. Olive Hill 
McGuffey. Harold B., Smith Grove, LO 3-2022, LO 3-3031 
McHenry. Louis P., 4081-. Main, Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McLeod, Robert N.. Maplewood Dr., Somerset, 678-5569, 

678-8766 
McMillin, Larry L., Rt. No. 6, Cynthiana, So2-M 4 Cynthiana, 

9104 Richmond 
McMullan, Cecil, Rt. No. 2, Golden Pond, WA 4-5504, WA 4-5504 
McNeely, Albert T., P. O. Box 203, Glasgow, Olive 1-2094, 



McPike, Ray S., D. C, 309 Theatre Bldg,, Louisville, GL 1-3832, 

JU 5-2832 
Macon, Alan L., 1759 Wilart Dr., Louisville, SP 6-7906, JU 

4-1361, Line 473 
Maines, George E., 3418 Terrace Dr., Erlanger, DI 1-7460. 

DI 1-7460 
Malone, Donald R., 2530 South 13th St., Ironton, Ohio, 

JE 2-6224, JE 2-4086 
Martin. Charlie, P. O. Box 53, Sharpsburg, CH 7-2611 
Matthews, Lyie, Dr., 105 Albany Rd., Monticello, FI 8-3066, 

FI 8-3286 
Mattingly, Bernard, P. O. Box 183, Cloverport, SU 8-3308, 

SU 8-6652 
Maxwell, James E., P. O. Box 58. Warsaw. 7-2001, 7-2001 
Mav, E. B., Jr., P. O. Box 185, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2314, 

TU 6-8661 
Mayo, Henry L., 581 College St., Paintsville, 789-4465, 

789-4001 
Meade, Foster "Sid", South Portsmouth, FL 2-1391, FL 2-1311 
Melmige. James, Matewan, W. Va.. HA 7-2861, HA 6-4401 
Melton, Curtis Ray, Rt. No. 2, Madisonville, TA 1-1406, TA 1-3870 
Messerian. Nishan, Universtiy of Ky., Lexington 
Metcalf. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd.. Paducah, 442-1359 
Mever. Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, BL 1-3459, 

PA 1-4334 
Middleton, Johnny, Rt. No. 1, Berea 
Milbern, Daniel Lee. 322 E. Maxwell, Lexington, LB.M. 2535 

(Bus.) 
Miles, Joseph D.. 124 Harrison, Jeffersonville, Indiana, BU 

2-4794. SP 6-4653, Louisville 
Miller, Bob. 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-5885, UN 

1-8000 
Miller, Ferrell. P. O. Box 64, Cadiz. LA 2-3360. LA 2-8575 
Miller. James T., 132 Frisby Dr., Monticello. FI 8-3917 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Indiana, BU 3-6335, 

EM 6-6286 
Millerhaus, W. J., 923 Harris, Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-7522 
Minton. Eugene H., 313 13th St.. Henderson, VA 7-3193 
Miracle Ed. P. O. Box 998, Lynch. 848-2326, 848-5486 
Mitchell Emmitt, 284 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 5-3511, 4-0032 
Moll, Francis B., 820 Mulberry, Mt. Vernon, Indiana, PO 3-2870, 

PO 3-4489 
Moore, James E.. Rt. No. 5, Box 91A, London, VO 4-2054, 

1915 Corbin 
Moore, Pete, College St., Barbourville 
Moore, Robert W., Jr., 441 Forest Ave., Erlanger, DI 1-6837, 

HE 1-4040 
Moser, Rudy C, Dixon, ME 9-5317 

Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd., Madisonville, TA 1-4864, TA 1-2644 
Murrell. Allen L., 1602 Glendale, Bowling Green. VI 2-1286, 

VI 3-4334, Ext. 21 
Mussman, Ralph, 502 Monroe, Newport, JU 1-4562, CO 1-1300 
Nantz. Wilburn, Wooton 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 
Neal, Gene, Davis Pike, Rt. No. 1, Batavia, SK 3-5908, 

AU 1-4630 
Neal, Marion, 2215 8th St., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-3948, 

EL 3-4401 
Newman E. B., 602 5th St., Paintsville, 789-4227 
Nelson. Charles L., Bremen, 461 

Newton, C. M., 2041 Dellwood Dr., Lexington, 7-2865, 4-2431 
Noble. Charles B., 1164 Main St., Jackson, 2728, 9224 
Noel, John "Pete", 148 E. 42nd St.. Covington, CO 1-3397, 

CH 1-1822 
Nixon, James W., 2713 Canton St., Hopkinsville. TU 6-2641 
Nord, Ed. 1734 S. 23rd St., Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401, 

Nunn, Wesiey L., Star Route, Brandenburg, GA 2-3326, GA 

2-4560 
O'Daniel, Jeff, Rt. No. 1, Lebanon, 723-L 
Okruch, Nicholas, 401 E. Parkland, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-3740, HA 4-3331, Ext. 324 



Oldham, John Herman, Rt. No. 1, Box 79A, Prospect, 

CA 8-1698 
Omer, Billy W., Reed Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-2833 
Overly. W. H.. Somerset, 678-5275 

Padgett, R. K., 123 Central Ave., Somerset, 678-5485, 678-4141 
Palmer, Carl A., 2506 So. 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Parker, Billy E., P. O. Box 731, Pineville, ED 7-3293 
Parker, Jerrold Boyd, 846 Tremont Ave., Lexington, Maysville, 

LO 4-5835, Richmond 1775 Ext. 13 or 2742 
Patrick, Ralph, 1700 Edward, Ashland, EA 4-7535, EA 4-1111, 

Ext. 566 
Paulin, Al. 538 Franklin St., Tell City, Indiana, KI 7-3323, 

KI 7-3323 
Payne. Gayle, Bethlehem, UP 8-5980 
Penner Merritt D., Jr., Rt. No. 2, Box 528, Manchester, 

LY 8-4098 
Pergrem, Nard, 3315 Pine Haven Dr., Ashland, EA 4-7664, 

EA 4-1155, Ext. 288 
Perry, George B., 704 Mechanic, Princeton. EM 5-2633, EM 

5-5615 
Perry, James E., Rt. No. 6, Paducah, 443-6740, 444-6886 
Peters, Harold Dean, 421 Chambers, Paris, 1095 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", Russell, Grand 172, EA 4-1155, Ext. 258 
Phipps, Vencil, Clark St., Barbourville, 6-3129 (Bus.) 
Pike, Carl W., Jr., 543 Parker St., Hartford, Cy 8-3201 (Bus.) 
Pike, Robert F., 3F Rob. Terrace, Richmond 
Powell. Logan, 817 Delia Dr., Lexington, 5-1653, 2-3255 
Prall. John A., Eastern Ky. St. College, Richmond 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd., Louisville 18, EM 3-2908, 

EM 6-9125 
Price, James E., Star Route. Liberty, SN 7-2581 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

EL 3-0700, EL 3-6129 
Pruitt. Donald Wayne. 505 Waterfield Dr., Clinton, OL 3-6251 
Purdy, George D., Bradfordsville, 9001 (Bus.) 
Purdy, Jesse. Bradfordsville. 9001 (Bus.) 

Racel. A. David. Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, AN 7-6791 
Rains, Richard, Kenvir, 1792 Evarts 

Randall, H. C, P. O. Box 227, Columbia, 4-4661, 4-4711 
Randolph, Don M.. 6310 Shelia, Louisville 19, WO 9-6359, 

WO 9-5145 
Richards, Charles E., Waco, EM 9-5992, EM 9-5695 
Rickman, Murrel, College Station, Box 266, Murray, LA 7-8131, 

(Bus.) 
Rapp, William, 215 Heplar St., Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-1983. 

JE 2-7242 
Ratliff, Jerry R.. 15th St., Williamsburg 

Rawlings, Harold, 182 E. Park Ave., Radcliff, 4-2591, EL 1-3249 
Reding, Richard K., Box 1237 College Station. Murray 
Reece, Larry H., Canmer, LA 8-2462, PR 3-3131 
Reed, Charles R., 102 Elizabeth St., Versailles, TR 3-4213, 

CA 7-2231, Ext. 436 
Reed, Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 

HI 1-4946, KI 1-4607, LI 2-4507 
Reed. William F., 329 Mentelle Park, Lexington, 6-4768, 2-4363 
Renfro, John E., 445 Florence, Williamsburg, 6488, 4391-2721 
Rexroat. Jerry L.. Lebanon Junction, TE 3-4446. TE 3-4626 
Reynolds, Howard M., 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling, 1058, 

Lexington 3-1838 
Rhatigan, Alfred J., 10663 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-2479, EL 1-6400 
Richardson, Joe M., Star Route, Clifty, 48 (Bus.) 
Rickard, Bob, Bremen 

Riffe. James R.. 1122 Columbia, Newport, AX 1-4811 (Bus.) 
Rison, Johnny B., 197 3rd St., Ravenna. 723-2852, 723-2616 
Roberts, Donald G., 119 Mac Court, Harrodsburg, 1060, 229 
Roberts, Earl Ray, Rt. No. 2, Philpot, PA 9-4012 
Roeckers, Bernard, 803 Loda Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, PL 2-1140, 

TE 1-5103 
Rogers, Howard, 8 Walker Ave., Winchester, PI 4-1785, Lexing- 
ton 2-2220, Ext. 2231 
Roller, Otis. 808 Chamberry Dr., Louisville, TW B-6356, JU 

7-1121, Ext. 309 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th St. Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-4036, 

JE 2-3231 
Rose, Lee H., Rt. No. 3, Paris Pike, Lexington, 4-0087, Transy. 

Ath. Dept. 
Rosenbaum, Robert L., 117 Fairlawn Rd., Louisville, TW 7-2833, 

JU 4-8191 
Roudebush, Jack, Main St., Hartford, CY 8-3201 (Bus.) 
Rouse, Clyde L., 520 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, DI 1-6943, DI 

1-7737 
Rubarts, Leland G., Dunnville, Liberty. SU 7-2784 
Russell. Allen W., 1603 Sycamore. Murray, PL 3-2832 
Russell. Eugene "Eudy". 1106 Gallia St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

EL 3-7653, EL 3-2103 
Russell. Joe. Orchard Drive, Russellville. PA 6-6983. PA 6-6983 
St. Clair. Robert L. Jr.. 6703 Norton Ave.. Louisville, WO 

9-1023. EM 6-0326 
Sallee, Charles, P. O. Box 57, Evansville, Indiana, HA 2-8526, 

HA 3-1179 
Salyer, Gobel. Elkhorn City 

Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 442-3660, 442-2092 
Saylor, Deward. P. O. Box 407. Wallins Creek, MO 4-3594, 

MO 4-3444 
Schad, James E.. 10717 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-6495 
Scheben, W. J., 824 Dixie, Erlanger, DI 1-6054 
Schlich, Paul E., 3315 Dean Dr., Louisville, GI 8-6765, 
TW 6-0211 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Page Eleven 



Schmidt, Donald H.. 3415 Hycliffe, Louisville, TW 3-3742. 

JU 4-4221, Ext. 54 
Schnebelt, Carl R., Hanover. Indiana, UN 6-3581, UN 6-4561 
Schneider, Robert, 62 Woodlawn, Fort Mitchell. ED 1-1868 
Settle, Evan. 102 Alton Rd., Shelbyville, ME 3-1847, ME 3-1847 
Sellman. John B.. 423 Deerfield Lane, Louisville, TW 7-2757, 

JU 6-3393 
Sexton, William L., 324 4th St., Dayton, HE 1-5941, MA 1-4321, 

Line 40 
Shanks, Thomas E., 3210 Ainslie Way, Louisville, GL 2-9513, 

JU 4-1361. E.xt. 474 
Shaw, Earl, 109 Hill Court, Lancaster, 624, 2208 
Shirley, Henry R., Rt. No. 2, P. O. Box 485, Fairdale, EM 

Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662, 1240 

Shumate, Robert, 311 Berry, Covington, HE 1-7672, MA 1-4900 

Siler, Clarence M., 8th St. & Cumberland. Williamsburg. 6188 

Sipes. Jimmy. Caneyville 

Smith. Edgar J., 3904 Farmview, Louisville. GL 8-1286, 

EM 6-8746 
Smith, Leonard, P. O. Box 1404, Albany 

Smithson. Richard A.. 428 6th St.. Bowling Green. VI 2-5564 
Sosh. LaRue, Uniontown 
Sosh. Nelson. Uniontown 
Spahr, David L., Rt. No. 4, Padueah 

Spaulding, Stan, 434 Gordon, Waverly, Ohio, 816-M, 51 
Stamper, Paul, Grassy Creek. SH 3-3612, SH 3-4675 
Stanfill, Robert S.. Louisa, ME 8-4014, EA 4-1111, Ext. 529 
Starns. Harry T., 170 Forest Ave., Lexington, 2-4326 
Steenken, William R.. 1636 Highland, Covington, ED 1-3787, 

HE 1-3108 
Steinke, Donald F., 8001 Granville Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

JA 2-1606, KI 1-9646 
Stephenson. Thomas H., Rt. No. 8. Padueah. 898-3136 
Stewart, Herbert T., 323 Deaton. Hazard. GE 6-2438, GE 6-9941 
Stiff, Maurice, 1509 Arcade, Louisville, EM 8-4186, JU 7-9177 
Stines, Ray A., Sue Bennett College Campus, London, VO 4-5001, 

VO 4-2610 
Stinson, Charles L., Maple St.. Horse Cave, ST 6-2711, ST 

6-7131 
Stone, Sidney P.. Box 606. Uniontown. 86 
Strange. William L.. McCullum Ave.. Elizabethtown. RO 5-4003, 

RO 6-6286 
Strong, Arnett, 425 Cedar, Hazard, GE 6-3938, GE 6-2141 
Stull, Woodson, Frenchburg. 36 

Sturgill. Barkley. Prestonsburg. TU 6-6781, TU 6-2391 
Suffill, Bob, Drakesboro, 2939 
Sugg, Johnnie Dean, Rt. No. 6, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4798, 

TU 6-4431, Ext. 348 
Sullivan. Don C. Prestonsburg, 886-2144, Frankfort CA 3-8221, 

Ext. 61 I 

Sutton, Ronnie N.. 1509 Chestnut. Bowling Green, 3-9408 
Tarlton. Thomas O.. 2111 Eastern Parkway. Louisville. GL 

1-0366 
Taylor, Bob, 4209 Hewitt, Louisville, GL 8-4293 
Taylor. Carl Ray. P. O. Box 542, Corbin, 158, 1360 
Taylor, Hal A.. 9802 Orlandi Ct., Jeffersontown, AN 7-6764, 

GL 1-4330 
Thomas, Frank M.. 520 So. 10th St.. Louisville. JU 7-0441, 

JU 4-9178 
Thompson, Arthur Lee, Hatcher Ct., Apt. No. 1, Pikeville, 

GE 7-4476, GE 7-9141 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Dr.. Louisville, GL 2-9256 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, BL 1-3394, 

WA 1-0047 
Thompson, Tommy D.. Rt. No. 1. Symsonia. 2001. Padueah 

443-2476 
Tinsley, Marion F.. P. O. Box 447, Central City, 1721, 321 
Todd, Lonnie H., Rt. No. 2. Madisonville. TA 1-5028. TA 1-6862 
Troutman. Doyle C. 211 S. Main St., Harlan. 1937.622 
Tuck, Ochell, 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Tucker, Neal R., 1812 South Viv., Hopkinsville, TU 5-8070, 

BR 1-2020 
VanArsdall, Fred, P. O. Box 104. Burgin. PL 8-5104 
VanMeter. Kaye Don. Bee Spring. LY 7-3676 
Varner. Ray. 3169 Hyde Park Dr.. Lexington. 7-6029. 5-4224, 

Sta. 210 
Vescovi, Raymond B., 3525 Laurel Ave. Evansville. Indiana, 

HA 3-8144, WO 3-3124 
Vettiner, Chas. J.. Armory Bldg., Louisville 
Vinson, Ray T., McRoberts 

Vipperman, Albert E., Ransom, GA 7-2810. EL 3-7362 
Waide. Harry D., 601 Princeton St., Providence, MO 7-6563, 

MO 7-2066 
Walke, Glenn R., 902 1st St., Paintsville, 789-4086, 789-3140 
Walker, Paul R., City Hall, Bowling Green, VI 3-8893. VI 3-8326 
Walters. Bayard Harding, 601 Cherry St., Henderson, VA 6-9973 
Ward, Jack, 1909 Circle Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-4147, MU 3-3675 
Ward, William D., Frenchburg, 508-3178, 508-3178 
"Warner, Marvin, Nancy. 678-4844 
Watkins. Paul D.. 606 East 20th St., Owensboro, MU 3-8726, 

MU 3-3375 
Watson, Clifford Lee, 66 McCullum, Independence, FL 7-3331, 

KI 1-1630 
Weaver, Ray, 55 Thompson Ave., South Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-3741, 

CH 1-2341 
Weisbrodt, Paul E., 837 Sherwood, Lexington, 7-3924, 7-3457 
Welch. John H., Neon, 2829 
Welch, Ralph W., 1B3 S. Crestmoor Ave., Louisville 6, TW 

8-B874 



Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 

1-8094, GA 1-5700, Ext. 691 
Wells, Milford, 344 Bays Ave., Morehead, ST 4-6781, CA 7-2231, 

Frankfort 
Wesche. James A., 427 Queensway, Lexington, 6-7263, 6-2780 
Westhoff, Robert A., 26 St. Jude's Circle, Florence, AT 3-2971, 

DI 1-6066 
Whalen, William Clinton. Rt. No. 1, Maysville. LO 4-3942, 

LO 4-3461 
Whtie, David B., 237 Longview Dr., Bowling Green, VI 3-3884 

VI 3-4331 
White Harlie. Jr., Rt. No. 5, Tompkinsville, HU 7-3193, 

HU 7-6617 
White, James E.. Main St., Lynch, 868-5608 
White, Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 3101 
Wigginton, Al, Sr., 1606 Windsor Place, Louisville, GL 1-3260, 

SP 6-7881 
Wilcox, Edgel M., 206 Jarboe St.. Campbellsville. 77-W 
Wilcox. Ursal R., Auxier, TU 6-3329, TU 6-3085 
Will, Charles "Chuck", Plainview Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-2638, 

TA 1-3262 
Willett Arthur "Bud", 2926 Richland, Louisville, GL 1-1818, 

JU 2-8680 
Williams, Benny, Rt. No. 3. Philpot. PA 9-4666 
Williams. Bobby. 220 Stratford Ave.. Richmond. 2671. 56 
Williams, George W. Rt. No. 1, Box 134A, East Bernstadt, 

VI 3-2502 
Wilson H. G.. 205 N. Maple. Somerset. 679-1290, 679-1644 
Winfrey, Shelby, 108 Holly, Berea, 806 

Wingfield. F. G., 1134 Eastern Parkway, Louisville, ME 5-2751 
Wirtz, Howard A., 6510 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

JA 2-1818, PL 1-1323 
Wise, Jack, 408 Fountain Ave., Georgetown, 2062, Sadieville 

2071 
Withrow, Roy D., 424 Res. Ave., Central City, 742-W 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb St.. Henderson. VA 6-4526 
Wood. Kenneth C 547 Robin Ave., Frankfort, CA 3-0244 
Woods, Fairce O., Box 247. Jackson, NO 6-6384, NO 6-2805 
Woodward, Danny H., Pine St., Box 263, Nortonville, OR 6-3200, 

TA 1-7484 
Woodward, Durwood, 6715 S. Madison, Madisonville, TA 1-2492, 

TA 1-6463 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 714 Cedar Grove Ct., Louisville. SP 4-6173, 

JU 7-1161 
Wurtz. Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-0526, 

DU 1-1232 
Yancey Wm. Thomas. 3618 Waggoner, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4336, HA 4-6676 
Yeary. Bill, 156 Lowry Lane, Lexington, 7-1578. 7-1578 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
ball, it will be an Official's time-out in (b). (3-4-2, 3) 

9. Play: Al is on the sideline at the 50 yardline 
and he touches the ball while it is loose on Team B's 
48 yardline. Where is the ball out-of-bounds? 

Ruling: Ball is out-of-bounds on the 48 yardline 
of Team B. (4-3-2) 

10. Play: 4th and 10 on R's 28. Field goal attempt 
by KI strikes lineman K7, who is on R's 23. Ball 
then goes over the crossbar. 

Ruling: No field goal. This is first touching. It is 
1st and 10 for R on their 23. It is also a touchback 
but it would be to R's advantage to take the ball 
where awarded because of the first touching. (6-2-4) 

11. Play: 4th and 10 on R's 40. K2 first touches 
the kick on R's 20. R2 muffs it and K3 recovers on 
R's 10. After the ball becomes dead, R3 clips K4 or 
R's 15. 

Ruling: The ball is awarded to R at the spot of 
first touching, (R's 20) after which the penalty foi' the 
foul by R3 is enforced. It will be R's ball on their 10, 
1st and 20. (6-2-4) 

12. Play: 4th and 25 on K's 35. K's scrimmage- 
kick is first touched by KI on R's 35. Rl then muffs 
the ball in attempt to recover it. Subsequent to touch- 
ing by R and prior to recovery by Rl on his 30, E2 
clips K2 on R's 40; (a) K accepts penalty; or (b) 
K declines penalty. 

Ruling: (a) K's ball, 1st and 10 on the 50. (b) R's 
ball, 1st and 10 on R's 30. (6-2-4; 10-3-2) 

13. Play: Rl signals for a fair catch. He muffs 
the ball and, while it is in the air after the muff, K2 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1960 



blocks RL 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. K may 
legally block R after the kick has been touched by R. 
Prohibition of not touching R is removed after kick 
is touched by R. (6-4-5) 

14. Play: Al, who is less than one yard behind 
the line and with his hands in position to receive the 
ball when snapped between the snapper's legs, receives 
the snap. He backward passes to A2 who then forward 
passes to Al, who has advanced beyond the line of 
scrimmage. 

Ruling: Legal. (7-5-5 (a)) 

15. Play: Al attempts a long forward pass and 
ineligible A8 goes downfield beyond the neutral zone as 
soon as the pass is thrown or in flight. The pass is 
deflected by B4 into the hands of A8, who advances 
across Team B's goal line, 

Ruling: Touchdown. All Team A players become 
eligible as soon as B touches the ball. Ineligible play- 
ers may go down field as soon as the pass is thrown 
or is in flight. (7-5-5 (b)) 

16. Play: Al forward passes to end A5. After 
pass by Al is in flight ineligible A8 advances and re- 
mains beyond the line. A5 throws a backward pass to 
A2, who is behind his line of scrimmage. A2 then 
throws a long forward pass to A3. 

Ruling: Interference by AS. The 15-yard penalty 
is measured from the previous spot and the down is 
counted. (7-5-6 (a)) 

17. Play: 3rd and 10 on B's 40. Al throws a for- 
ward pass and, while it is in flight, Bl interferes with 
A2 by waving his hands in front of the eyes of A2. 
At approximately the same time, and while the ball is 
in flight, B2 commits pass interference which is flag- 
rantly unsportsmanlike. 

Ruling: This is a multiple foul and Team A has 
the choice of penalties. Undoubtedly, they would ac- 
cept the penalty for the foul by B2, enforcement of 
which will give Team A the ball on Team B's 12 1/2 
yardline. The measurement for the penalty for pass 
interference places the ball on B's 25 and the measure- 
ment for the flagrantly unsportsmanlke conduct places 
the ball on B's 12 ».. (7-5-6 (b)) 

18. Play: Bl intercepts legal fonvard pass in his 
end zone. He then: (a) attempts to run with the ball 
but steps on the sideline in the end zone; or (b) 
runs with the ball and is tackled in his end zone; or 
(c) advances the length of the field to A's end zone. 
During the i-un, B2 clips Al on B's 6; or (d) same 
as (c) except B2 clips in his own end zone. 

Ruling: (a) touchback; (b) touchback; (c) B's 
ball, 1st and 10 on its 3 yardline; (d) safety if penalty 
is accepted; touchdown if penalty is declined. (8-5-1) 

19. Play: 3rd and 5 on B's 40. Al takes snap on 
the 50 and throws a backward pass to A2, who, on his 
42, bats ball forward and out-of-bounds on: (a) the 
50; or (b) on B's 40. 

Ruling: Illegal batting in both (a) and (b). If 
B accepts the penalty in (a) or (b) it will be 3rd and 
38 for A on its 27. (9-4-3) 

20. Play: 2nd down and 14 on B's 26. Bl holds 
Al on B's 28 and A2 is downed there. 

Ruling: Penalize Team B from the spot where the 
run ends. The half-the-distance to the goal line penalty 
places the ball on Team B's 14 yardline and it is 2nd 
down and 2. (10-5-1) 

21. Play: 4th and 10 on B's 14. B2 holds during 
a run which ends on B's 9. Is it 1st down for A after 
the enforcement? 

Ruling: No. It is 4th down and 1/2 yard to go. 
(10-5-1) 



School for Basketball Officials 

The twelfth annual School for Basketball Officials 
was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on August 
14-15. The school was directed by State Basketball 
Clinic Director Charlie Vettiner. 

The picture on the cover of the ATHLETE are the 
officials representing fifteen of the sixteen basketball 
regions. Elmo Head, who attended the School as a 
representative of Region 8, was not present when the 
picture was made. The services of these men will be 
available at K.H.S.A.A. member schools throughout 
the forthcoming season. They will conduct additional 
clinics for officials, coaches, and players, and will as- 
sist beginning officials in registration. It is ui'ged 
that the services of the regional representatives be 
used by Association members. 

The aim of the School is uniformity in officiating. 
Topics which were discussed during the three sessions 
were as follows: 

Rules changes and interpretations 

General study of the rules 

Signal drill to secure uniform signalling, of viola- 
tions, fouls, etc. 

Floor technique on jump balls, fouls, and field 
goals 

How to determine primary responsibility in charges 
and blocking situations, for contact on stationary 
screens, and for contact on moving screens 

Guarding the dribbler, and the player with the 
ball 

Switching, post play, rebounding, receiving a pass- 
out on a fast break, and screen play 

Riot-causing decisions 



Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
amination for Officials will be given in Kentucky on 
Monday, September 26. An official who has been reg- 
istered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "appi'oved" 
rating in football are required to make a minimum 
percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain this 
rating from year to year. Officials who hold the "certi- 
fied" rating keep this rating by attending one or 
more clinics each year. Eligible officials who wish to 
take the test should write the state office. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

The 41st annual meeting of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations was 
held at Glacier Park Lodge, East Glacier Park, Mon- 
tana, on July 3-6, 1960. Forty-two State Associations, 
including Alaska, in addition to affiliate Associations 
of Ontario and Saskatchewan, Canada, were represent- 
ed. Fifty-seven State Executive Officers or Assistant 
Executive Officers, 142 State Association Board of 
Control Officers and additional Board Members attend- 
ed. Several National A.ssociations, including the Nat- 
ional Association of Inter-collegiate Athletics, the 
American Junior Bowling Congress, the American 
Association of Health, Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion, the National Association of Secondary-School 
Principals, the National Association of Sporting Goods 
Manufacturers, and the National Forensic League were 
also represented. The total individual attendance was 
627. The K.H.S.A.A. was lepresented by President 
Russell Williamson; Vice-President Louis Litchfield; 
Directois W. B. Crowdus, Robeit P. Forsythe, K. G. 
Gillaspie, and Cecil A. Thornton; and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield. A subsequent issue of the 
ATHLETE will give a report on the meeting. 



Our Thanks 

TO THE COUNTY AND 

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

AND 

THE COLLEGES 

AND 

INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS 

WHICH HAVE CHOSEN US 

TO HANDLE 

THEIR STUDENT AND ATHLETIC 

ACCIDENT PROGRAMS FOR 1960-61 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

^<4e KiH<^e<n Qo^nfUiH^ general agent 

W. E. Kingsley J. E. McCreary, Spec. Agt. Charles C. Price 

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The Player . . . 



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1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 



The Coach . . . 



1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 



The Ofiicial . . . 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator . . . 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct, 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



hmiiiii 



<r 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
DCTDBER - leBD 



National Federation Annual Meeting 

The opening General Session of the 41st annual 
meeting of the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations was held in the Moccasin 
Room of the Lodge at East Glacier Park, Montana. 
The session was called to order at 8:00 P.M. by Presi- 
dent HERMAN F. KELLER. Vice-President CHARLES 
E. WETMORE served as meeting coordinator. Ap- 
proximately 425 of the 627 who were in attendance 
were present at the opening session. An appropriate 
invocation was given by W. G. RAFTER, a former 
President of the Montana High School Association. 
The group was cordially welcomed to Montana by 
H. P. LUND, President of the Montana High School 
Association and a member of the National Federation 
Executive Committee. Mr. Lund's welcome included 
a history and description of early life in Montana. He 
told many interesting and enlightening anecdotes 
about Montana pioneers and early life in the territory 
and state. His presentation was infoniiative, as well 
as humorous, and was exceptionally well received. 
On behalf of Glacier Park Lodge, a welcome was also 
extended by its Manager, Captain Demarest. Captain 
Demarest extended a very warm welcome to the group 
and then presented to President Keller, an attractive 
white gavel, to be used by him in calling sessions, dur- 
ing the meeting, to order. President Keller acknow- 
ledged the welcomes on behalf of those attending the 
meeting and expressed the appreciation of everyone 
for the opportunity to meet in the fine suiToundings 
provided by Glacier Park. Mr. Keller anticipated an- 
other excellent conference, such as was in the tradi- 
tion of National Federation annual meetings. 

The speaker of the evening, HARRY F. MIKEL- 
SON, Secretary of the Montana Education Associa- 
tion and Superintendent of Schools at Sidney, Mon- 
tana, was introduced by EMILE PEREY of the Mon- 
tana Board of Control. Mr. Perey told of the speaker's 
wide and active interest in educational and civic 
affairs throughout the state of Montana. 

In his excellent address, "Faith-Freedom-and the 
95%", Mr. Mikelson stressed the importance of es- 
tablishing and maintaining worthwhile goals in any 
program. The establishment of goals is necessary in 
all programs, civic, educational, religious, athletic and 
business. The goals must be constantly kept before 
the group and the gioup must be encouraged to work 
for them. Mr. Mikelson cautioned that we must keep 
our democratic way of life but, ,that to do so, requires 
an eternal vigilance so that the 5% does not ruin 
our organization. In a complacent society or group, 
the 5% can be much more effective than the weight 
of their numbers would indicate. The speaker dis- 
cussed several aspects of the teaching profession and 
reminded the group of the responsibilities of teachers. 
First and foremost, young people must be educated 
to accept and use responsibility and not shirk from it. 
Boys and girls in school must be taught to develop 
a sense of responsibility in many areas, including the 
home, family, community, church and nation. The 
degree with which the responsibility is accepted is an 
indication of the individual's maturity. To be success- 
ful and effective, teachers must like hard work. They 
must be willing to give completely of themselves and 
to contribute in any area they can. 

Other speakers who had an active part in the 
the program included many of the State Executive 
Officers and Board of Control officers or members. 



Among the many excellent presentations were those 
made by MILTON RAYMER, Executive Director, 
American Junior Bowling Congress; M. F. PETER- 
SON, Superintendent, Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, North Dakota; ROSWELL D. MERRICK, Ath- 
letic Consultant, American Association for Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation; CALLOWAY 
TAULBEE, Board of Directors, National Associa- 
tion of Secondary-School Principals; HARRIET MIL- 
LER, State Superintendent, Department of Public In- 
struction, Montana; NILES SWANSON, Administra- 
tive Director of Radio and Television, D'Arcy Adver- 
tising Company, Chicago, Illinois; BRUNO JACOB, 
Executive Secretary, National Forensic League; DR. 
PAUL BRECHLER, Commissioner, Mountain States 
Athletic Conference; and ROBERT WARREN, Vice- 
President, Denver Security Life and Accident Com- 
pany, Denver, Colorado. 

The general. Board of Control, and Executive 
Officers' sessions held during the three-day meeting 
included the following topics: Basketball Hall of 
Fame, Today's Junior High School Athletic Program, 
All-Star Contests and Continuing Eligibility, Student 
Age Bowling Programs, Values of a Broad and Bal- 
anced Program, Medical Aspects of High School 
Sports, State Association Pension Plans, A School 
Board Association Member Reports, From a State 
Superintendent's Notebook, Athletics and Physical 
Education — Teammates, Alliance Committee Meeting, 
Eligibility Rules Administration and Trends, There 
Are Emergencies, National Association of Secondary- 
School Principals Looks at Athletics, The Advantages 
of Being Independent, Television Plays the Game, 
The 1960 Football Code, Interpretation Meeting Pro- 
grams, Committee Reports, Rules Training Programs 
and Possibilities, State Association Finances, Are 
There Services to Be Added?, Tournament and Meet 
Planning, Athletic Insurance Problems, All-Star Game 
Control and Problems, State Association Public Rela- 
tions, Individual Activities and Sports Seasons, and 
Summer Athletic Camps. 

Tuesday evening was devoted to a banquet. Dur- 
ing the banquet, citation certificates were presented 
on behalf of eleven most deserving recipients, with 
Vice-President Charles E. Wetmore making the pre- 
sentations and the listed committee giving assistance. 
Five of the recipients and their wives were in places 
of honor during the banquet. These included: T. H. 
KIRBY (Alabama); H. D. LEBERMAN (Pennsyl- 
vania); VAUGHN E. McCOLEY (Kansas); TED 
MUNCASTER (Washington); and ANDREW J. 
SMITH (New York). Certificates were presented in 
absentia to JOHN BURKE (Rhode Island); W. R. 
FUGITT, deceased, (West Va.); R. G. HEIN (Wis- 
consin); LOUIS H. HOLLWAY (Michigan); DR. 
HAROLD F. SCOTT (Rhode Island); and C. EVER- 
ETT STEVENS (New York). The names of those 
cited and a brief biographical sketch for each citation 
is appended as a part of these minutes. During the 
banquet, ALBERT WILLIS (Illinois) presented an 
appropriate and dignified memorial for W. R. FU- 
GITT, who passed away during the year. The Tues- 
day night session included a brief showing of the new 
film "Official Football", produced by the Official Sports 
Film Service under the supervision of Director W. M. 
RUNYON. S. E. ALKIRE (Illinois) and J. C. 
H.^RPER (Alabama) assisted. 

The Montana High School Association, as the host 
state Association, provided a wonderful schedule of 
entertainment activities for those in attendance at 
the meeting. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIII— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1960 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Installment II 

22. Play: End Al goes from the huddle to a 
position near the line of scrimmage but he faces in 
the wrong direction so that he is not "on the line." 
Before the snap, he starts in motion backward and 
is in motion a couple of yards behind the line at the 
snap. Is his motion a shift and is his action legal? 

Ruling: This is a shift. It is a foul by A for not 
coming to a stop for one second. (2-25) 

23. Play: Substitute A2 replaces Al during a dead 
ball. Before the ball becomes alive, A3 enters for A2. 

Ruling: Foul. After administration of penalty, 
A3 may remain in game. (4-7-1) 

24. Play: 3rd on 50. Punt by Kl is touched beyond 
the line by Rl, after which: (a) R2 commits a foul 
and R3 recovers; or (b) K2 commits a foul and K3 
recovers. 

Ruling: In (a), if K declines penalty, 1st dovm 
for R where recovered. If K accepts penalty, K's ball 
15 yards in advance of the previous spot, 1st and 10. 
In (b), if R declines the penalty, 1st down for K where 
recovered. If R accepts penalty, 1st and 10 for K 15 
yards behind previous spot. 

Comment: The rulings hinge on two fundamentals. 
After any penalty is measured, ball belongs to team 
which was in possession at the time the foul was com- 
mitted. In (a) and (b), team K was in possession 
even though the ball was loose. The other fundamen- 
tal is, assuming no foul occurs before a scrimmage- 
kick is touched beyond the line by R, such touching 
always ends a series, regardless of whether penalty 
for the foul, which is thereafter committed, is accepted 
or declined. (5-1-lc; 10-3-1) 

25 Play: Is the effect of the touching of a scrim- 
mage-kick by R beyond the line the same as for a 
change of team possession? 

Ruling: It is the same as far as ending a series 
of downs is concerned. Such touching of a kick differs 
from a change in team possession in three ways. 
After a kick is touched (but not possessed) by R, 
if it rebounds and is recovered by K behind the neu- 
tral zone, K may advance ball by throwing a legal 
forward pass. They could not do this after a change 
of team possession. If the kick, after such touching 
by R, rebounds behind the line and K chooses to ad- 
vance by second punt, such punt is a scrimmage-kick, 
while it would be classified as a return-kick if it 
occurred after change of team possession. The touch- 
ing of a kick by R does not change status of the two 
teams as far as Offense or Defense is concerned, while 
the change of team possession would reverse the 
status of the two teams. This would make a difference 
only in case a foul should occur after the touching or 
after the change of possession. (5-l-2c; 6-2-1; 6-3-1) 



26. Play: 4th and 10 on K's 25. Kl kicks and kick 
is first touched by K2 on R's 40. While the kick is 
rolling and prior to being touched by R, Rl clips K3 
on R's 45. R2 falls on the ball on R's 35. 

Ruling: If the penalty is accepted, R will be penal- 
ized 15 yards from the previous spot, which gives K 
a 1st and 10 on its 40 yardline. If K should decline 
the penalty, Rl could then take the ball on its 40 
yardline where K2 first touched it. (6-2-5) 

27. Play. 3rd and 10 on K's 30. Kick by Kl is first 
touched on K's 40 by K2. While kick is rolling, Rl 
holds: (a) prior to; or (b) subsequent to touching of 
the kick by R2 and it then rebounds behind K's line 
of scrimmage where it is recovered by K4 and ad- 
vanced across R's goal line. During the advance, R3 
is guilty of holding K5. After the ball becomes dead, 
K6 strikes R5. 

Ruling: In (a), the automatic acceptance of the 
penalty for holding by R3 results in a touchdown. 
Team K is penaltized 15 yards at the succeeding kick- 
off and K6 is disqualified in both (a) and (b). It is also 
a touchdown for team K in (b) regardless of whether 
the penalty for the holding by R3 is accepted or de- 
clined. (6-2-5) 

28. Play: Before the snap, end A7 charges across 
the neutral zone and linebacker B4 blocks A7 while 
he (A7) is on B's side of the line of scrimmage. 

Ruling. Encroachment by A7. (7-1-1) 

29. Play: After ball is placed and declared ready- 
for-play, snapper: (a) lifts the ball from the ground; 
or (b) rotates it on the ground to adjust it. After ad- 
justing it, the snapper removes his hand from the 
ball. 

Ruling: Foul in both (a) and (b). Snapper is con- 
sidered to have moved the Ijall in other than a legal 
snap unless he completes his snap after he places 
his hand or hands on the ball. He cannot lift the ball 
in any event after it has been placed ready-for-play. 
He can, of course, adjust immediately prior to making 
the snap. (7-1-3) 

30. Play: Al takes position on end of line and 
then legally shifts to the backfield to leave former 
tackle A2 on end of line. If tackle has hand on ground, 
may he move to a new position 

Ruling: After having placed a restriction on him- 
self as a tackle, such restriction continues to apply 
unless the team is called up for new signals or move- 
ment by A2 is caused by B stepping into the neutral 
zone too soon. (7-1-2) 

31. Play: End A7 takes a 3-point stance on the 
end of the line. Wingback Al then shifts to a position 
on the end of the line outside of A7. May A7 move 
to a new position? 

Ruling: No. A7 became an interior lineman when 
Al took a position on the end of the line outside of 
A7. (7-1-2) 

32. Play: Does B make a false start by stepping 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



OCTOBER, 1960 



VOL. xxni— NO. 3 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Vice-President W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors— W. H. Crowdus (1958-62). Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-621, Louisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-64), Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



1960-61 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the August issue of the ATHLETE, 
the Board of Control in a meeting held last May voted 
that the insurance subsidy for each K.H.S.A.A. mem- 
ber school be the same for 1969-61 as that for 1959-60, 
namely, a basic amount of $30.00, with an additional 
subsidy of $30.00 for schools maintaining football. 
School administrators wishing to take advantage of 
the subsidy may write to the State Office for re- 
imbursement forms. Some of the companies with which 
Kentucky schools place their insurance business give 
the schools credit for the amounts due and bill the 
Association for these amounts. The reimbursement 
plan and the credit plan are both satisfactory. 



Jtrom the Commissioned s L/ffice 

The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. will attempt to set up seven 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be held on 
Saturday, October 29, 1960. The sites are Paducah, 
Bowling Green, Clarkson, Louisville, Bellevue, Lexing- 
ton and Paintsville. Entry blanks will be sent to the 
principals of all member schools who have indicated 
that they plan to sponsor cross country teams this 
year. The state cross country run is scheduled to be 
held in Lexington on November 12. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each registered official should file 
at once with his bureau head and/or the nearest bureau 
head his schedule of games and a list of dates on which 
the official will be available to call games. The names 
of the bureau heads, with their residence and business 
phone numbers are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State College, 
Murray, Res. No. PI3-3579, Bus. PI3-2310, Ext. 236 

Region 2. Charles Irwin, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 
Res. No. TU6-4820, Bus. TU 6-4820 

Region 3. Larue Sosh, Uniontown, Res. No. 4, 
Bus. 1 

Region 4. Joe Richardson, Star Route, Clifty, Bus. 
Greenville 48 

Region 5. Turner Elrod WKSC Bowling Green, 
Res. No. VI2-5110, Bus. VI3-4334 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, McCullum Ave., Eliza- 
bethtown, Res. No. R05-6273, Bus. Ft. Knox 4-7129 

Region 7. Claude Ricketts, 10217 Starlight Way, 
Valley Station, Res. No. WE 7-8610, Bus. ME 4-1551, 
Ext. 220 

Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olympic, Louisville 7, 
Res. No. TW6-9071, Bus. TW 5-3401 

Region 8. Elmo Head, 113 Alton Road, Shelby- 
ville, Res. ME 3-4220, Bus. ME 3-1750 

Region 9. John Schaar, Belleville High School, 
Bellevue, Res. No. CO 1-5069, Bus. CO 1-2980 

Region 10. Jack Wise, 408 Fountain Ave., George- 
town, Res. No. 2052, Bus. 2072 Sadieville 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle Drive, 
Lexington, Res. 4-9620, Bus. 4-2431 

Region 12. Briscoe Inman, Centre College, Dan- 
ville, Res. 3075, Bus. 1900, Ext. 26 

Region 13. Bill Nau, Clark St., Barboui-ville, Res. 
6-4112, Bus. 6-3057 

Region 14. Paul Wright, 349 Broadway, Hazard, 
Res. GE 6-4277 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Riverview Drive, Pike- 
ville. Res. GE 7-6410, Bus. GE 7-6410 

Region 16, Ernie Chattin, Y.M.C.A., Ashland, Res. 
EA 4-2665, Bus. EA 4-6191 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abele, George F.. 125 Louisiana Ave., Lexington 

Albrecht, Roger, 2700 Chestnut St.. Portsmouth. Ohio, EL 4-1711 

Alley. Joe, Route 2, Prichard. West Virginia 

Aspy, David N., 18 Cardwell Way, Louisville, AN 7-1827, 

TW 5-0567 
Black, Charles D., 138 Pine. Barbourville, LI 6-4148, LI fi-4167 
Blackburn. Adrian. Prestonsburg. TU 6-2401 

Bordy. Philip, 2208 Emerson. Louisville, GL 8-2674, JU 4-0459 
Broderick, Carroll A., Helm Hotel, Bowling Green, 2-6636, 

2-0101 
Campeau, Thomas J., 216 Jackson St.. Berea 
Cole. Harold, River Rd., Barbourville, LI 6-4326. LI 6-4167 
Coulter, William. 807 Taylor Ave.. Evansville 13, Ind,, HA 

3-7510, HA 4-8268 
Cox, William J.. 148 Holly St., Pineville, ED 7-3209, Harlan, 

Ky. 721 
Grain, Wallace S., Lt., Abn. School, Ft. Campbell, 4162, 2006 
Crawford. Patrick L.. 2514 Hermitage Way, Louisville, TW 

2-2705, TW 5-9420 
Creasey, Fred, 204 Washington, Sebree 
Daniel, Ernest H., 810 23rd St„ Ashland. EA 4-2785. EA 4-1155, 

Ext. 511 
Davidson. Norman L.. P. O. Box 644, Rt, No. 10, Louisville, 

Cedar 9-7811, ME 4-1681, Ext. 302 
DeSantis. Enrico. 5th St. West. Huntington, W. Va. 
Deutsch. T. C, Jr.. 504 Clinton Springs Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PL 1-6075, UN 1-4000 
Ellis, Johnny. P. O. Box 331. Prestonsburg. TU 6-2761. TU 

6-3080 
Fahey. Bernard D., 5839 A Brett Drive. Ft. Knox, 4-3984, 4-7645 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft, Thomas, HI 1-6288, KI 1-1800, 

Fitch, F. A.. 166 Wilson Ct.. Huntington, W. Va, 
Foster. J. W.. 821 Carneal Rd.. Lexington, 4-8068, 3-3335 
Fraley, Bill, 407 Monterrey, Owensboro, MU 4-4663 
Gibbons, E, G. lEd), 6928 Hurd Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. BR 

1-2580, MU 1-2200 
Gillespie, Robert C, P. O. Box 982, Pikeville, 7-7190 
Gilligan, Jack, 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 2-2042, 

JA 2-2042 
Gourley, Harold E„ 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 3-4016, GR 6-6191 
Hagy. Harold J., 715 Grant St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Home. Frank E.. Appalachia. Va. 
Hulsey. Donald R., 3011 W. Virginia. Evansville. Indiana, 

HA 5-3677, WO 3-3124 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Rd.. Middlebsoro 
Jackson. Dennis M.. 121 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-6016, PL 3-6016 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr., 348 Friedman Ave.. Paducah. 443-1767. 

6-6311, Ext. 793 
Landon. T. J.. 631 Elberon Ave.. Cincinnati 6. Ohio, GR 1-2641, 

EX 7-7310 
Lewis, Jesse O. D., Route 1, Box 202, Proctorville, Ohio 
McKenzie, Paul, Pikeville 
McKinney, Adelle F., 6370 G Van Voorhis. Ft. Knox, 4-6169, 

4-4835 
Masters. Lester. Big Stone Gap. V.a 
Miller, Kenneth H.. 4166 B Gaffey Heights. Ft. Knox, WI 

2-3092. 4-1864 
Mudd, Ed. 3512 Mildred Dr.. Losuiville. SP 6-6888 
Murray. Thomas. 611 Edgecliff. Covington. HE 1-1929 
Newman. Bill. 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth. Ohio, EL 3-6257 
Peak, James F.. Rt. No. 1. P. O. Box 336. Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-6671 
Peeno, Harry R., 422 Oak St., Ludlow, JU 1-7336 
Perkins, Hilly R., Rt. No. 1. Georgetown. 1849 
Pinson. Eugene. 3208 Hackworth St., Ashland, EA 4-6B48, 

EA 4-3101 
Russell, Gary E., 1024 Book Street, Henderson, VA 7-2764 (Bub.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Page Three 



Sapp, Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville 20, GL S-8989, 

GL 4-7511, Ext. 2924 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Vandorn. Corbin, 2187, 2187 
Schellhase, David, 1614 Keck Ave., Evansville, Indiana, HA 

5-9790 
Schutz, John J.. Jr., 3221 Hickory Grove, New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 4-9457 
Selbee, William A., 3336 Springbourn, Catlettsburg, N 284, 

4-8282 
Sellman, John B., 423 Deerfield Lane, Louisville 7, TW 7-2757, 

JU 5-3393 
Selvy, Curt, Corbin, 2422, 1333 
Shilney, Stephen J., 6006 Middlerose, Valley Station, West 

7-3469. Spring 6-4655 
Shumate. Roy V.. Benham, 848-2538, 848-5406 
Stone, Clifton, 2930 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Indiana, GR 

6-3918, HA 5-3137 
Tackett, Jay, Georgetown, Rt. No. 3, Georgetown, Stamping 

Ground 832-6653, Georgetown 2047 
Taylor, D. C, Box 176, Benham, 848-2284, 848-5406 
Tharpe, Robert L., 212 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-4671 
Troutman, Bill, P. O. Box 265, Kenvir, 1-7077 
Trowbridge, Joseph N., 221 P. G. Nail, Newport, HE 1-7308 
VanGilder, W. S., 8925 Old South Park Rd., Louisville 19, WO 

9-6759, JU 7-1121, Ext. 560 
Vennell, Robert H., 2055 Donald Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Williams, James H., 2428 Admas St., Ashland, EA 5-2733, 

EA 4-8282 
Williams. Smythe Jack, 315 Murrell, Frankfort, CA 7-7016 
Willis, Donald A.. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2079, BU 5-3407 
Wilkerson, Benjamin P.. 5307 Washington, Evansville 15, 

Indiana, GR 6-4560, UL 3-3381 
Winfree, George E., Shakertown Rd., P. O. Box 89, Danville, 

Wittenburg, Howard. 1723 Oakland, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 
3-4001 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Roy D.. 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 7, TW 5-6367, 

TW 6-0567 
Akins, Charlie. Rt. No. 2. Cecilia, TO 2-1911, RO 6-5453 
Albright, G. F.. P. O. Box 179, Irvington, LI 7-3131, LI 7-2051 
Allen, Lowry R.. Rt. No. 1, Bowling Green, VI 3-9346, VI 3-3203 
Allen, Nelson R., P. O. Box 656, Russell, EA 4-1456, Russell 

Oak 249 
Back, Bill, Vicco 

Baker, Joe R., Kt. No. 4, Hopkinsville, AD 5-5096 
Baker. Roger K., Whitley City, DR 6-2383 
Ball, Delbert, Burgin, 748-6395, 748-5221 

Barry, Harold L.. 1618 E. Cumberland Ave., Middlesboro, 2731 
Bartley. James Gale, Rt. No. 3. Slaughters, TU 4-2952, TU 4-2952 
Bates, Gardner, 218 Field, Cumberland 

Bell, Jimmy D., Sunnylane, Murray. PL 3-2206, PL 3-9021 
Bennett, Bert A.. 14 Doris Dr., Covington, JU 1-2121, HE 1-6157 
Black, Amos. 325 Moreland, Harrodsburg, 734-4775, 734-4195 
Black, Charles D., 138 Pine, Barbourville, LI 6-4148, LI 6-4167 
Blackburn, Adrian, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2401 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, CY 7-4923, AM 6-2164 
Kodner, Robert D.. 2009 Neville Dr., Louisville, EM 8-3406 
Boone, Billy R.. 206 W. Main, Lebanon Junction. TE 3-4643 
Borden, W. B. "Jack", Cave City, PR 3-3364, PR 3-3671 
Branaman, Bill. Jr., 203 Goodwin St.. Corbin, 2594, 504 
Broderick, Carroll A., Helm Hotel, Bowling Green, 2-5636, 

2-0101 
Brown, Bryant, P. O. Box 201, Owensboro, MU 4-3655, MU 

3-2401, Ext. 298 
Brown. E. C, Whipp Ave.. Liberty. SU 7-4421 
Brown. Eddie W., 15 Bustetter Dr., Florence, AT 3-6114 
Brown, J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 236-3474, 236-6515 
Brown, James A., 500 Blane Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 6-6308 
Bruner, Jack C, 133 Mahan Ave.. London. 4-6189, 4-4322 
Burchett, Lanier. 1007 Appen Ave.. Columbia, FU 4-2654, 

FU 4-4111 
Butcher, Granville "Bo", Williamsport, 789-3521 (Bus.) 
Butler. Donald A., 2505 Iroquois Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-3175, 

MU 4-1451 
Campbell, Lonnie, 424 Beaumont Ave., Harrodsburg, 1563, 1240 
Campeau, Thomas J., 216 Jackson St., Berea, 180, 8 
Carroll, George E.. 5829A Brett Drive, Ft. Knox, 4-1301, 4-1265 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 9-3801 (Bus.) 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod Rd., Ashland, EA 4-5358, EA 

4-6464 
Cole, Harold, River Rd., Barbourville, LI 6-4326, LI 6-4167 
Co'enan, James E., Phelps, GL 6-3424 (Bus.) 
Connell, Charles Edward III, 1219 West Main, Shelbyville, 

ME 3-2447, JU 3-2571 
Cooke. George W., Havre De Grace, Maryland 
Cooper. Hewlett, Hazel Rd., Murray, PL 3-3336, PL 3-3381 
Cooper. Warren, 120 Barber Ct., Morehead, ST 4-6515, ST 4-4390 
Cox, William J., 148 Holly St., Pineville, ED 7-3209, Harlan, 

721 
Craig, John G., Rochester, 934-2712 



Crawford, Tom, 2146 Algonquin Parkway, Louisville, SP 2-7604, 

SP 8-3941 
CreecTi, Harvey J., Leatherwood, OR 6-3061 (Bus.) 
Davis, David A., 6629 Stewart St., Portsmouth, Ohio, PR 6-7206 
Dawson, Alby L., Vets Village, Morehead, ST 4-5649 
DeMoisey, Truett R., 113 North Main, Walton, HU 6-4203, 

HU 6-7200 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-0795, HI 1-0795 
Denny, Murrell C, Rt. No. 3, Eubank, 379-4440 (Bus.) 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 1-0136, 

Kirby 1-9640 
Di.xon, Charles T., Woodland Ave., Burkesville, 3302, 39 
Dobson, Kenneth, Rt. No. 3, Paducah, 442-0778, 443-4534 
Dowdy, Donald, 403 Brand St., Mayfield, CH 7-6521, CH 7-5621 
Draugher, Bartram, Hindman, ST 5-4845 

Duerson, William Robert, P. O. Box 480, Lancaster, 612-R (Bus,) 
Eaton, James M., 2016 Merriewood Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-1188 
Edmiston, Raymond Lee, 442 Weldon Ave., Madisonville, TA 

1-5567 
EMridge, James R., P. O. Box 337, MSC, Morehead 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Rd., Elizabethtown, RO 5-4007, 

RO 5-6118 
Ellis. Walter H.. Rt. No. 1, Box 188, W. Paducah, 443-1439 
Ensslin, Charles W., North Main St., Barbourville, LI 6-3276, 

LI 6-3019 
Fahey, Bernard D., 5839 A Brett Drive, Ft. Knox, 4-3984, 

4-7645 
Farley, Jimmy, 126 Crane, Somerset, 678-5751 (Bus.) 
Farmer, Lee Ralph, 100 Liberty, Somerset, 679-1245, 678-8194 
Feix, Al, 1602 N. Elm St., Henderson, VA 7-3321, VA 6-2327 
Fleenor, Francis, Skyline Dr., Bowling Green, VI 2-2185, 

VI 2-0307 
Flynn, Reynolds P., 2009 Scott St., Covington, HE 1-5080 (Bus.) 
Flynn. Robert D., 110 Halls Lane, Lexington, 4-7924, 2-9474 
Francis, Wendell, 419 Milton Ave., Glasgow, OL 1-5687, 

OL 1-3111 
Fraley, Bill, 407 Monterrey, Owensboro, MU 4-4663 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Dr.. Richmond, 2919-J, 1595 
Fuson, Shelvie, 312 Englewood Rr., Middlesboro, 1541, 263 
Gabbard, John B., 320 N. Hill St., London, VO 4-5915, VO 

4-2863 
Gambill, Roger A., Blaine, OL 2-3164 
Gamble, Gerald E., 602 S. Railroad, Earlington, DU 3-5620, 

OR 6-3191 and OR 6-3318 
Gardner, Howard E.. McCullum Ave., Elizabethtown, RO 6-6273, 

Ft. Knox 4-7129 
Gibson, Fred W., College Heights, Bowling Green, VI 3-4334, 

Ext. 225 : also 738 First St. Henderson, VA 6-9416 
Giles, J. W., 1043 So. 43rd St., Louisville 11, SP 8-1976, JU 

4-6365 
Gillespie, Robert C, P. O. Box 982, Pikeville, 7-7190 
Gilligan, Jack, 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 2-2042, 

JA 2-2042 
Glaysbrook, James E., 127 Virginia, Madisonville, TA 1-2596, 

TA 1-2596 
Coins, Herman, Gatliff Rt., Box 17, Williamsburg 
Goldsmith, Bill, Maysville Country Club, Maysville, LO 4-5465 
Gordon, Billy K., P. O. Box 21, Waddy, TA 9-5191 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, 

Indiana. HA 3-4016, GR 6-6191 
Griese, Warren J., Rt. No. 1. P. O. Box 226-5, Evansville, 

Indiana, YA 5-2880, HA 3-4012 
Griffith, Daryel, Mouth Card 

Grisham, Jesse R., 1527 Roosevelt St., Henderson. VA 7-1035 
Hackel, John C, Jr., 3409 Burrell Dr., Louisville 16, EM 

8-8207, BU 3-3511, Ext. 4260 
Hagedorn, Thomas, 434 W. 11th St., Newport, AX 1-6793, 

KI 1-1800, Ext. 1147 
Haines, William E., Morehead St. College. Morehead, Russell, 

Oak 851 
Hampton, Ray, 726 Richardson St., Clarksville, Tenn., MI 7-4969, 

MI 7-1577 
Hardin. Ben, Marrowbone, 2102, 2276 
Harned, Vic, 70 Roberts Ct., Leitchfield, 192 J, 300 
Harper, Jimmy Dale. Beechmont, Drakesboro, GR 6-2264 
Harris, Joe D., Nebo, CI 9-3429 
Hitt, Billy D., Rt. No. 2, Mayslick, SO 3-2608 
Hoffeld, Bernie E., 172 Rugby Rd., Lexington, 3-0517, 2-2230, 

Ext. 3329 
Heldman, John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville 14, EM 3-2181 

ME 7-2531 
Hendren, John F., 4139 B Gaffey Heights, Ft. Knox, WI 2-2556, 

4-3328 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose, Lexington. 6-2759, 2-2868 
Hobby. Bill. 907 Mechanic, Princeton, EM 5-5195, EM 6-2051 
Hoggard, Bob, 1409li; Center St.. Bowling Green, 3-8204 
Holmes, Mike, Mannington, TU 6-1345, OR 6-3461 
Holtzelaw, James R.. Rt. No. 4. Hustonville, FI 6-2396 
Home. Frank E.,Appalachia, Virginia 

Howard, Carl, Rt. No. 4, Bowling Green. VI 2-3392, VI 3-8722 
Hudson, Oscar, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard, GE 6-3858, GE 

6-2733 
Hurst, Donald, 421 South 6th St.. Bardstown, FI 8-3218, PT 

8-3345 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Rd., Middlesboro 
Jackson, Dennis M., 121 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-5015, PL 3-5015 
Johnson, Gerry R., North Main, Russellville, PA 6-2573 



I 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Jordan. "Art". Jr., 52G Dalton St., Owensboro. MU 3-1024. 

MU 3-2401, Ext. 300 
Joyce, Clayton. Court Drive. Fulton, 2061, 2080 
Justice. Morris W.. 722 Scott Ave., Pikeville. 7-7927. 7-6339 
King-, David L.. Rt. No. 1 West Paducah, HU 8-1106 HU 8-1106 
King, E. Lawson. 644 S. Limestone. Lexington. 4-1895 
King. P. J., 307 Coast Guard Lane. Owensboro. MU 3-2401 
King. Russell. 943 Whiting. Lexington. 4-3049 
Landolt. Gene, 1002 Payne. Murray. PL 3-4707. PL 3-1893 
Lay, William B.. 1205 N. Lime, Lexington. 2-6829. 2-2250, 

Ext. 3131 
Leadingham, Jesse, East Main, Greenup, OR 3-5641, EA 4-1155, 

Ext. 321 
Lewis, Donald, 509 Martin St., Harlan, 1289, 815 
Lewis, Howard. 939 Florence Ave., Louisville 15, EM 6-6911, 

CH 5-4161 
Lewis. Milus G.. Bailey St.. Loyall. 1119-W, 2 
Logue. Ronald Gene. 2235 3rd St., Danville. 236-3580 
Louden. Hubert C, 332 Scout St., Louisville. GL 8-6720. 

JU 7-8411 
McCargo. Frank. Rt. No. 2. Hopkinsville, TU 6-4532. TU 5-9400 
McCarter, Bobby G., Rt. No. 6, Hopkinsville, HA 4-6034. 

Ft. Campbell 3320 
McClellan. Leonard B.. 2512 Goldsmith Lane. Louisville, 

GL 8-2598, JU 7-9111, Ext. 3B 
McClearn Al. 1028 Sunset Dr., Clarksville, Tenn., MI 7-3873, 

MI 7-1577 
McGuire, Paul R.. 749 Sunset Dr.. Lexington. 6-2969 
McKinney Adelle F., B370G Van Voorhis, Ft. Knox, 4-6169, 

4-4835 
McPeek. Stewart R.. Dorton 

Mack Joel C, 112 F. Thomas, Lexington. 4-9377, 2-0640 
Maddox, Donald, 420 Highland. Madisonville. TA 1-2042 
Mahan Carle "Buddy", Hampton Manor, Winchester, PI 4-4550, 

PI 4-3464 
Meek, Walter, Williamsport 

Meier Dwight L.. 208 S. Walnut, Wilmore. UL 8-3572 
Meredith. Denny E., Jr., 4433 Larkwood, Louisville, SP 2-0U57, 

JU 4-8191 
Meyer, LeRoy C. 732 Logan, Louisville, JU 7-6351, ME 7-3611, 

E.xt. 261 
Miley, Robert L., 625 California Ct., Paducah, 443-5232, 

442-1641 
Miller. Jack. College St.. Barbourville 
Miller, Rex J.. 2711 Greenway Rd.. Ashland, EA 4-5023, 

EA 4-6641 
Miller Victor Leon. 218 Linden Ave., Southgate, ST 1-0619, 

HE 1-3778 
Mohahan, Ed.. 6821 Tarawa Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, VA 1-6582 

MU 1-8300 
Moore Charles H.. 218 E. Crest Dr., Reading, Ohio, PC 1-0290, 

VA 1-3889 
Moore Arnold D.. 435 30th St.. Ashland. EA 4-0249 
Moore Roy. London. VO 4-5023. VO 4-5023 
Moser.' Emerson. Sebree. TE 5-7769 
Moss Julian. 106 Dickerson Ct.. Lancaster. 29. 27 
Motley, Paul. 209 Kentucky Ave.. Richmond. 619-J. 619-J 
Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd., Madis( 

1-2644 

Mudd. Ed. 3512 Mildred Dr.. Louisville. SP 6-6888 
Mueller. Frank J.. 578th Ord. Co.. Fort Riley. Kansas 
Murphy. Donald J.. 8875 Long Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, WE 

1-3189. WE 1-3189 
Myers. Edward B.. 312 Seay, Glasgow, OL 1-2948 
Myers. Lee E., P. O. Box 46. Big Stone Gap, Virginia 
Nelson, William O., Greenville. B20-J 
Neville, Fred, 2528V. So. 9th St., Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-9801. 

JE 2-9801 
Newman. Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth. Ohio, EL 3-6257 
Newsom Lawrence. 1949 Bellefonte. Lexington, 7-3060, 4-9116 
Newsome, Forest. Wheelwright. 2784, 2142 

Nie Allen F., 1031 Isabella. Newport, AX 1-6840. CO 1-1725 
Noel. Robert A.. 9 Euclid. Winchester, PI 4-1265 
Noble. Leonard. 439 Court St.. Jackson. NO 6-2430, NO 6-2887 
Osborne. Homer L.. Dr.. P. O. Box 771. Hazard. 6-3894, 6-4992 
Oldham, Charles, 110 Frederica, Hartford 
Owen Harry E.. 563 Fair Field Dr.. Lexington, 7-4786 
Pack, James W., Rt. No. 1. Box 25. Catlettaburg, Park 253, 

Ashland EA 4-1111. Ext. 526 
Parks J. M. 924 Yarbro Lane, Paducah, 444-6567 2-5292 
Payne, Gayle. Bethlehem. UP 8-6980 
Peeno. Harry R.. 422 Oak St., Ludlow, JU 1-7336 
Perkins Billy R., Rt. No. 1. Georgetown. 1849 
Perkins William E.. 481 Erie Rd., Lexington, 6-3195 
Petty, John F., Rt. No. 1, Gracey. AD 5-5063, AD 5-5063 
Prall. John A., Perryville Rd., Danville 
Reschar. John Y.. 6618 Pico Lane, Louisville, WO 9-2246, 

WE 7-2300 
Rice Willard S.. 3673 D. Fincastle Rd., Louisville, GL 2-1426, 

JU 7-1121, Ext. 250 
Roach. Earl Wilton. Rt. No. 1, Mayfield, FA 8-3642. Fulton 2080 
Roby. Joseph L.. 2325 Hardinsburg Rd., Owensboro. MU 3-6838 
Rodgers. David Glen. 102 Ohio St., London. VO 4-4542 
Rudd, Thomas. Rt. No. 4. Morganfield. 713-M2, 68 
Rutledge, Marvin L., 846 Ivy, Frankfort, CA 3-0296, CA 7-7381 



TA 1-4864, TA 



Sanders, Jack E.. Rt. No. 2. Cobb, Cadiz. LA 2-8863 

Scott. Charles E.. Wayland. EL 8-8025 

Scott. Luther. 211 Spruce St., Murray, PL 3-4649 

Schleicher. Richard Lee. 314 English, Leitchfiell, Brownsville 

LY 7-3341 (Bus.) 
Selbee. William A.. 3336 Springbourn, Catlettsburg. North 284, 

Ashland EA 4-8282 
Seelye. Arthur L.. 2309 Jones. Paducah. 444-7776, 443-5450 
Settle, Roy G.. 1413 St. Mary's Ave.. Owensboro, MU 3-2136, 

MU 3-3574 
Sexton, Steven C. P. O. Box 354, Whitesburg. 2455, 2339 
Shaver. Roy. Bremen. 3002. 22 
Sherrow, Curtis, Harrodsburg. CO 4252 
Shope, Lowell M.. Mittendorf Ave.. South Webster, PR 8-2425, 

BL 9-5601 
Shuck, Thomas G.. 960 Stonewall Rd.. Lexington. 7-1472, 

2-9596 
Simons. Joe A.. Rt. No. 2, Flemingsburg. VL 5-4681 
Simpson. Fred C. 7191/2 13th St.. Ashland 
Smith. John K.. M & S Court No. 1, Williamson. W. Va. 
Snowden. Ken. 833 Hilltop. Danville. 236-2924. 236-6373 
Somers. E. A.. Rt. No. 3, Harrodsburg. Cornishville 4170 
Spencer, Irvin E.. 10414 Sunlgiht Way. Valley Station, WE 

7-7855, WE 7-2300 
Spiceland, S. E.. 305 South 13th St., Murray. PL 3-2811 
Stikeleather. Clyde L.. 201 Goff Drive. Leitchfield, 892-R, 104 
Straub, Charles. Jr.. 930 E. 2nd St., Maysville. LO 4-6096, 

LO 4-3781 
Stroud, Donnie. 2600 Frederica. Owensboro. MU 3-6403 
Stuart. Ronald Wayne. 270 Spring Lake. Madisonville. TA 1-2776 
Taylor. Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes Ave.. Murray. PL 3-4826, 

PL 3-5125 
Tharpe. Robert L.. 212 Spruce. Murray. PL 3-4671 
Todd. W. O.. Jr.. Rt. No. 3. Eubank. 678-5351 (Bus. I 
Turner. Thomas. 9836 Douglas Walk. Cincinnati 15. Ohio, 

PR 1-5055. PR 1-4100. Ext. 1574 
Urlage. Richard C. 822 Highland Ave.. Ft. Thomas. HI 1-5613, 

GR 1-8120 
Van Sant. William E.. 101 Holaday Lane. Lakeside Park, 

DI 1-6087 
Wallen, Howard W., Williamsport. 789-3066. 789-5060 
Weathers, Charles. Jr., 3620 Grand Ave.. Louisville. SP 4-2944 
Weaver. B. H., Robin Road. Horse Cave. ST 6-6781. ST 6-6181 
Weber. John. 3204 Watson Ave.. Covington. AX 1-8662 
West. Art F.. A-207 Shawneetown. Lexington. 2-8446 
Westerfield. Glenn. 3216 N. Bedford, Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 3-9570, HA 6-2247 
Wiler. James W., Blaine. OL 2-3541 
Williams. James H., 2428 Adams St.. Ashland, EA 6-2733, 

EA 4-8282 
Williams, Roger, P. O. Box 166, Richmond. 2407 
Williams. Smythe Jack, 315 Murrell. Frankfort. CA 7-7016 
Williams. Willie H.. 619C Aspendale Dr.. Lexington, 2-1654, 

Willis. Donald A.. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2079, BU 6-3407 
Winchester, Roy L., Vaughn Mill Road, Louisville 18. CE 

9-5202, TW 6-0567 
Wintree. George E.. Shakcrtown Rd., Box 89, Danville, 3379 
Wood. H. Philip. Rt. No. 6. Bowling Green. VI 2-0168 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, OR 4-3927 
Yates. Virgil. Wingo. FR 6-2432. FR 6-3271 

Change in address or phone number. Meade, Foster "Sid", 
South Porlsniouth, YE 2-3684, YE 2-3221 



LIST OF CORRECTIONS 

I960 Football Rules Publications 
RULES BOOK 

1. Rule Differences from Last Edition (inside front 
cover). 1-2-2 Note: Permissible crossbars should be 
listed as 23 feet 4 inches. 

2. Page 50, Comments on 1960 Rules Changes. 
1-2-2 Note: Same correction as 1. above. 

CASE BOOK 

1. Page 9 No. 19 Declining penalty in (a) results 
in a touchback. Declining penalty in (b) would result 
in a safety. 

MEETING FOLDER 

1. Page 1, Question 25: Correct answer should be 
"no". There is an exception to the general statement 
when the Defense fouls during a try and the try is 
successful. 

2. Page 5, Topic Assignment 2, Question 10: Rl 
could take ball at spot of first touching if penalty were 
declined but here, penalty is automatically accepted. 
Since penalty is from the goal line, it is a touchdown. 

3. Page 9, Fundamental 11: In this situation the 
period must be extended. 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K. H. S. A. A. 



The following schools are members of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for the year ending June 30, 1961. 
Principals of member schools should check this list carefully 
to see if the names of schools with which they have scheduled 
games are included. This list was compiled and sent to the 
printer on October 1. A supplementary list of member schools 
joining in October will appear in the November issue of the 
magazine. 



Adair County 

(Columbia) 
Adairville 
Allen County 

(Scottsville) 
Anderson 

(Lawrenceburg) 
Annville Institute 
Ashland 
Attucks 

(Hopkinsville) 
Auburn 
Augusta 
Austin Tracy 

(Lucas) 
Auxier 
Ballard Memorial 

(Barlow) 
Barbourville 
Bardstown 
Bate 

(Danville) 
Beaver Dam 
Beechwood 

(S. Ft. Mitchell) 
Belfry 
Bell County 

(Pineville) 
Bellevue 
Benham 
Benton 
Berea 

Betsy Layne 
Black Star 

(Alva) 
Bloomfield 
Booker T. Washington 

(Ashland) 
Boone County 

(Florence) 
Bremen 
Bourbon County 

(Paris) 
Bowling Green 
Boyd County 

(Ashland) 
Bracken County 

(Brooksville) 
Breathitt 

(Jackson) 
Breckinridge County 

(Hardinsburg) 
Breckinridge Training 

(Morehead) 
Bristow 

(Bowling Green) 
Brodhead 
Bryan Station 

(Lexington) 
Buckeye 

(Lancaster) 
Buckhorn 



Bunche 

(Glasgow) 
Burgin 
Burnside 
Bush 

(Lida) 
Butler 

(Louisville) 
Butler County 

(Morgantown) 
Caldwell 

(Princeton) 
Calhoun 
Calloway County 

(Murray) 
Camargo 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Campbell County 

(Alexandria) 
Campbellsville 
Camp Dick Robinson 

(Lancaster) 
Caneyville 
Carlisle 
Carlisle County 

(Bardwell) 
Carr Creek 
Carrollton 
Carter 
Catholic Country Day 

(Louisville) 
Catlettsburg 
Caverna 

(Horse Cave) 
Centertown 
Central 

(Louisville) 
Central City 
Chandler's Chapel 

(Auburn) 
Charleston 

(Dawson Springs) 
Christian County 

(Hopkinsville) 
Clark County 

(Winchester) 
Clarkson 
Clay County 

(Manchester) 
Clifty 
Clinton County 

(Albany) 
College 

(Bowling Green) 
Corbin 
Cordia 

(Hazard) 
Covington Catholic 
Crab Orchard 
Crittenden County 

(Marion) 
Cub Run 



Cuba 

(Mayfield) 
Cumberland 
Cumberland County 

(Burkes vile) 
Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson Springs 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
De Sales 

(Louisville) 
Dike Combs 

(Jeff) 
Dixie Heights 

(S. Ft. Mitchell) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Dotson 

(Princeton) 
Douglass 

(Henderson) 
Douglass 

(Murray) 
Drakesboro Community 
Drakesboro 
DuBois 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Dunbar 

(Mayfield) 
Dunham 

(Jenkins) 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Durham 

( Campbellsville ) 
Durrett 

(LouisvUle) 
Earlington 
East Benham 

(Benham) 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
East Main 

(Lynch) 
Edmonson County 

(Brownsville) 
Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Eubank 
Evarts 
Ezel 
Fairdale 
Fairview 

(Ashland) 
Falmouth 
Fancy Farm 
Farmington 
Feds Creek 



Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville)) 
Flat Gap 
Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming-Neon 

(Fleming) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Praize 

(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Fulton 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Garrett 
Georgetown 
Glasgow 
Glendale 
Good Shepherd 

(Frankfort) 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensburg 
Graham 
Greenup 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Hanson 
Harlan 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazel Green 

(East Bernstadt) 
Hazard 

Hazel Green Academy 
Heath 

(W. Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Hickman County 

(Clinton) 
High Street 

(Bowling Green) 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
Hindman 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 19G0 



Hiseville 
Hitchins 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 
(Latonia) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
Howevalley 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Ii-vington 
Jackson 
J. M. Atherton 

(Louisville) 
Jenkins 
Jessamine County 

(Nicholasville) 
Junction City 
Kentucky Military Inst. 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. School for the Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Knott County 

(Pippa Passes) 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
LaRue County 

(Hodgenville) 
Laurel 

(Camp Dix) 
Leatherwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 
Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Letcher 
Lewisburg 
Lewisport 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lily 
Lincoln 

(Franklin) 
Lincoln 

(Paducah) 
Lincoln Institute 

(Lincoln Ridge) 
Livermore 
Livingston Central 

(Burna) 
Lloyd 

(Erlanger) 
London 
Lone Jack 

(Four Mile) 
Louisa 

Louisville Countiy Day 
Lowes 



Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynn Camp 

(Corbin) 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 
McCreary County 

(Whitley City) 
McDowell 
McKell 

(South Shoie) 
McKinney 
Mackville 
Madison Central 

(Richmond) 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Male 

(Louisville) 
Marrowbone 
Martin 
Mason 

(Lancaster) 
Mason County 

(Maysville) 
Mayfield 
Maysville 
M. C. Napier 

(Hazard) 
Meade County 

(Brandenbm'g) 
Meade Memorial 

(Williamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Menifee County 

(Frenchburg) 
Mercer County 

(Harrodsburg) 
Metcalfe County 

(Edmonton) 
Middleburg 
Middlesboro 
Midway 

Millersburg Military Inst. 
Montgomery County 

(Mt. Sterling) 
.\Ionticello 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
.Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Mullins 

(Pikeville) 
Munfordville 
Murray 

Munay College 
Nancy 
Nebo 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 



North !\!arshall 

(Calvert City) 
North Middletown 
North W'arien 

(S.nitr.s Grove) 
Oldham County 

(La Grange) 
Old Kentucky Home 

(Bardstown) 
Oil Springs 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Oneida Institute 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owingsville 
Owsley County 

(Bconeville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
1-aintsville 
Paris 

Park City 
Farksville 
1'. L. Dunbar 

(Lexington) 
Pendleton 

(Falmouth) 
Perryville 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Pleasant View 
Pleasure Ridge Park 
Poplar Creek 

(Carpenter) 
Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prestonsburg 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Providence 
Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
[Jed Bird 

(Beverly) 
Reidland 

(Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Riverview 

(Hickman) 
Rockhold 
Rosenwald 

(Barbourville) 
Rosenwald 

(Harlan) 
Rosenwald 

(Madisonville) 
Rosenwald -Dunbar 

(Nicholasville) 
Rowan County 

(Morehead) 
Russell 
Russellville 
."^acramento 
St. Agatha 

(Winchester) 



St. Agies 

(Uniontown) 
St. Aloysius 

(Shepherdsville) 
£t. Cauillus Academy 

(Corbin) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Charles 

(Lebanon) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 
St. Joseph Prep. 

( Bardstown) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Vincent Academy 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Scottsville 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Sharpsburg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelby County 

(Shelbvvi'lle) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Slaughters 
Somerset 
Sonora 
Southern 

(Louisville) 
South Hopkins 

(Nortonville) 
South Marshall 

(Benton) 
South Portsmouth 
Springfield 
Stanford 
Sturgis 
Symsonia 
Taylor Countv 

(Campbellsville) 
Tavlorsville 
Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Tollesboro 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 

(Cadiz) 
Trimble County 

(Bedford) 
Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexington) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Page Seven 



Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Van Lear 

Vanceburg-Lewis County 
Versailles 
Vine Grove 
Virgie 
Wallins 

(Wallins Creek) 
Walton Verona 

(Walton) 
Warfield 
Warren County 

(Bowling Green) 
Wolfe County 

(Campton) 



Wayne County 

(Monticelio) 
Western 

(Owensboro) 
Western 

(Sinai) 
Western 

(Paris) 
West Main 

(Lynch) 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Wingo 
Woodbine 
Wurtland 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

into the neutral zone and then stepping back before 
the snap ? 

Ruling: No. B cannot false start. However, in an 
unusual case, B could commit encroachment by per- 
sisting in the action described in the above play, or 
if there is intended deception or the action of B is 
such that it throws A off balance. Because all A 
players are supposed to know when the snap is to 
be made and the players of B do not, Officials are 
generally liberal as to what constitutes legal action 
by B in this situation. (7-1-2) 

33. Play: Al advances across B's goal line. After 
ball becomes dead, A3 commits personal foul. A2 is 
offside. 

Ruling: Not a multiple foul. Acceptance for the 
offside penalty is automatic. Both fouls are penalized. 
Total loss of yards will be 5 yards plus 15 yards. 
(7-2-1; 10-1) 

■34. Play: Both Al and A2 are lined up behind 
the snapper with their hands reaching out as if to 
receive the snap. 

Ruling: There is no rule which prohibits two 
players from lining up behind the snapper with out- 
stretched hands in position to receive the snap, pro- 
vided, of course, only one of them is less than one yard 
behind the line and provided that, if he is less than 
one yard behind the line, he has his hands in position 
to receive the ball if snapped between the snapper's 
legs. However, he is not required to receive the snap. 
The second player may take a position behind the 
snapper with his hands in position to receive the snap, 
provided he is at least a yard back of the line of scrim- 
mage. If he is less than one yard behind the line in 
this situation, he is in an illegal position. (7-2-3) 

35. Play: 3rd down. Punt by Kl is touched by 
Rl beyond the line, after which it rebounds behind 
the line where it is recovered by K2. K2 chooses to 
attempt to advance by means of a legal forward pass. 
The pass is incomplete. Is the next down 4th or is it 
a new series? 

Ruling: The third sentence of 7-5-4 makes it clear 
that such an incompletion is followed by a new series. 
This is probably on the assumption that Rl had an 
opportunity to secure possession of the kick and 
"muffed" the opportunity. (7-5-4) 

36. Play: In advancing during a legal forward 
pass play, eligible Al stumbles and falls to the ground. 
The pass strikes him in the back and rebounds into 



IN MEMORIAM 

James F. Jiacoletti 

James F. Jiacoletti, 52, Wyoming High 
School Activities Association's efficient and 
per.-onable Executive Secretary, died in 
Chicago on Monday, August 15, 1960. Mr. 
Jiacoletti was in Chicago to attend a meet- 
ing for Central States Football Rule Inter- 
preters when he suffered an acute coronary 
thrombosis in his hotel room. 

Mr. Jiacoletti was born at Cumberland, 
Wyoming. He was a graduate of the Kem- 
merer High School and a 1931 graduate of 
the University of Wyoming, where he was a 
star athlete. In 1936 he received his Master's 
Degree from the University of Wyoming. 

Beginning his career in education as a 
Coach at Superior and then moving to Kem- 
merer, he later was appointed Superintendent 
of Schools at Hanna. He left Hanna in 1952 
to become the Executive Secretary of the 
Activities Association. 

Mr. Jiacoletti was a member of St. Chris- 
topher's Episcopal Church, the Masonic 
Lodge at Kemmerer, the Knights Templar, 
Korein Temple of the Shrine, Phi Delta Kap- 
pa, the Lions Club, Sigma Nu, and the Wyom- 
ing Alumni Association, of which he was 
President in 1941. During World War II, 
from 1941-1945, he was a Captain in the 
Wyoming State Guard. 



the air. Before the pass strikes the ground, it is caught 
by eligible A2, who advances. 

Ruling: Legal advance. (7-5-4) 

37. Play: A forward pass comes down over B's 
5. Bl intercepts while njnning toward his goal line. 
He gets ball in his hands on the 5, comes to the 
ground on his 1 and steps into his end zone before 
he can change direction. 

Ruling: Safety if ball becomes dead m B's pos- 
session in the end zone. (8-5-2a) 

38. Play: 1st and 10 on A's 3. Runner Al fumbles 
on his 2 yardline. Bl intentionally kicks the loose ball 
which is: (a) on A's 2; or (b) in A's end zone. Ball 
then goes out-of-bounds behind the goal line. 

Ruling: Declining the penalty in (a) results in a 
touchback. Declining the penalty in (b) results in a 
safety. In both (a) and (b), if the penalty is accepted, 
it will be 1st and 10 for A on its 18. (8-5-3) 

39. Play: 4th down and 9 on B's 18. A2 is offside 
during the down in which Al advances across team 
B's goal line. After Al is across the goal line, B2 
slugs A3. 

Ruling: Penalty for offside by A2 is automatically 
accepted and enforcement places the ball on B's 23 
yardline. The penalty for the foul by B2 (one-half 
the distance to the goal) is then measured. Adminis- 
tration of the penalty by B places the ball on B's 
11% yardline and it is 4th down and 2% to go. B2 
also is disqualified from the game. (9-2-1; 10-5-1) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

Television picked up in Louisville last 
month. I turned on my set, expecting to see 
"Quick-Draw McGraw" in "The Fastest Gun 
Alive" and instead saw "The Whistler" play- 
ed by Edgar McNabb, who was nobly sup- 
ported bv "The Enforcer," Joe Billy Mans- 
field of the K.H.S.A.A. 

"Mac" was on his football clinic tour with 
his roly-poly chaperon from the Commis- 
sioner's office. He was being interviewed by 
Cawood Ledford on a widely watched sports 
program. This is getting the job done! 
When fans are given an oj^portunity to learn 
something of the rules, a lot of problems are 
solved. "Rock" Reese was in Louisville with 
them but he must have "goofed" on his 
screen test. 

One of the best public relations practices 
emanating from the K.H.S.A.A. offices is 
that of sending a representative of that of- 
fice on the football and basketball clinic 
tours. All of the fellows like to have Ted or 
Joe Billy as guests in their regions. 

Kelly Thompson, President of Western 
Kentucky State College, writes to say that 
the courtesy of "The Hill" will be extended 
to visiting officials, coaches and school men 
at the basketball clinic, serving Region Five. 
Snell Hall, Western's auditorium seating 
more than three hundred, is our meeting 
place in Bowling Green. Thanks, Kelly! 

From my friend. President Bob Martin of 
Ea.stern Kentucky State College, comes an 
invitation to hold the annual clinic for Reg- 
ion Eleven in Richmond on the college 
campus next year. Eastern is moving rapid- 
ly forward under Bob's leadership. This is 
Western Kentucky State's Dutchman telling 
you to watch President Bob show Eastern 
Kentuckians how to promote. He's lucky to 
have "Personable John" L. Vickers, my old 
college teammate, assisting him. 

One more year and the Dutchman will 
have turned in his twentieth basketball clinic 
performance. This year is the nineteenth 
consecutive sashay. All of these 40.000 
miles of instructional driving started for him 
in 1942. Buford Clark, Barbourville's jolly 
mountaineer, traveled the clinic route in 
1940 and 1941, and Bernie Shively preceded 
Buford. Buford resigned after the 1941 
Assignment to enter the Royal Canadian 
Air Force. 

If you have never driven the "Clinic 
Route" you ought to on your next vacation. 




Claude Ricketts 

You'll learn what real Kentucky hospitality 
means. At Morehead Bobby Laughlin sets 
up an elegant luncheon at the Eagles Nest; 
at Ashland, George Conley breaks open his 
kid's pigg.v bank to buy fancy groceries for 
Mrs. Senator Conley to make into a welcom- 
ing dinner; hospitality affairs are arranged 
for all visitors at every clinic location; 
Elizabethtown's Howard Gardner will have a 
"Key to the City" waiting — It goes on and 
on and on. 

Claude Ricketts, Region Seven represen- 
tative for the K.H.S.A.A. basketball officials, 
called our attention to an error in the Play 
Situation book. "Play 367(1) and Play 
;i60(c) contradict each other," says Barney 
Claude. "You are so right," says Cliff Fagan, 
Executive Secretary of the National Federa- 
tion of High School Athletic Associations. 
Cliff says Play 360(c) is the correct answer 
and points out Rules 7-5 and 9-3 as refer- 
ences. Cliff goes on to say, "Interestingly 
enough Flay 367(1) is a carry-over from last 
year and, I believe, some years before, and 
to my knowledge no one has caught it." 
Claude Ricketts was a first year "Rookie" 
in the School for Basketball Officials in 
August. No one studies the rules more an- 
alytically than this Louisvillian who is a 
Harlan transplant. 

Coach Goebel Ritter of Hazard writes, 
"Dear Dutchman: Plea.se .send me informa- 
tion on Biddy League basketball for fourth, 
fifth and sixth grade kids. We want to start 
lea^-ues for these age groups." — "Catchem 
young" is a good idea, Goebel. The informa- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Page Nine 



tion is on its way to "them thar mountings." 

From Joe Richardson in Clifty comes the 
the memorandum that in his "School of Of- 
ficiating Mechanics" he is including Scorers 
and Timers. That's getting results. Joe has 
taught one session in September. All six- 
teen regions have representatives like Joe 
who will set up similar study sessions right 
away. 

Those little Corn Cob Pipes of Honor 
which go out each month to Kentuckians, 
rendering unselfish service to others, bring 
many gratifying letters to the Dutchman. 
Read this one from J. B. Cunningham, Prin- 
cipal of Camargo High School who got an 
award : "Dear Mr. 'Flying Dutchman' : I want 
to thank you for my 'Flying Dutchman's 
Award.' I can truthfully say that in thirty 
years of school work this is the most wonder- 
ful surprise award I have ever received. I 
had hoped for years that maybe some day I 
would receive it. I am fifty-six years of age 
and I have always said that I got more than 
I gave in my work with boys because it kept 
me 'young'. Again I want to assure you that 
I appreciate the recognition and will always 
keep my corn cob. More power to you and 
the other fine men in the state who are de- 
voting their lives to the young boys of our 
Commonwealth. Sincerely yours, J. B. Cun- 
ningham." 

Elizabethtown's Jim Hartlage is the win- 
ner of the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for Sep- 
tember. Jim's work to promote all types of 
wholesome sports just because he loves kids 
won him the honor after a dozen or more 
recommending letters crossed my desk. May 
Kentucky be blessed with more men like 
"Gentleman Jim" Hartlage! 

Somewhere in your district is an "unsung 
hero" giving unselfishly of himself or her- 
self for the good of young Kentuckians. 
Have you considered recommending that in- 
dividual for the "Cob Pipe" ? 

Somewhere in your region there is an 
organization or a school which is promoting 
good neighbor sports practices at athletic 
contests? Have you informed the Dutchman 
so that an Abou Ben Adhem citation may be 
conferred ? 

You ought to interest a "Game Guy" in 
your neighborhood in taking part in sports 
like other youngsters. Bob Kirchdorfer, our 
first "Game Guy" in 1949, is now the Man- 
ager of a swank country club off the Dixie 
Highway in Valley Station, and Bob has been 
paralyzed from his waist down with polio 



since the age of three. Recommend a fight- 
ing physically handicapped youngster with 
the "Heart of a Lion" and he will immediate- 
ly win the "Lionheart Lapel" award and be 
eligible to become the K.H.S.A.A. Game Guy 
of 1961. 

The Dutchman signs off with this thought: 
"Some people are like blotters, they soak it 
all in and get it all backwards." 

The Football Championships 

The K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control put into 
effect in 1959 a plan for determining state 
championships in football. The schools were 
divided into three classes. Class AAA schools 
are the larger schools in Jefferson County, 
Class AA schools are those with an enroll- 
ment of 275 or more in grades 10-12, and 
Class A are those with an enrollment of less 
than 275 in grades 10-12. 

The state was divided into four regions 
for Classes AA and A. Jefferson County was 
divided into two regions for Class AAA. A 
winner in each region is determined by the 
Dickinson system. To qualify for a regional 
championship, a team plays a minimum of 
four games in its class within the region. 
In Class AAA the two regional winners play 
for the championship. In Classes AA and A 
the winners of Regions 1 and 2 and the win- 
ners of Regions 3 and 4 play in semi-final 
games on the weekend prior to Thanksgiv- 
ing. The winners play for the state champ- 
ionship on the following weekend. 

The commissioner, who has been author- 
ized by the Board of Control to set up and 
plan the championships, has designated 
Thanksgiving Day, November 24, as the date 
for the AA and A playoffs, and the Board 
of Control has extended the AAA season to 
allow the championship game in this Class 
to be played on December 3. If a champion- 
ship game results in a tied score, the teams 
will be declared co-champions. 

Other regulations adopted by the Board 
of Control, which will be of interest to ad- 
ministrators and coaches are as follows: 

l.If a semi-final game results in a tied 
score, the following point system will deter- 
mine the winners : 1 ) one point for most pen- 
etrations of the opponent's twenty-yard line, 
2) one point for the greater number of first 
downs, 3) one point greater net yardage. If 
the teams are still tied after the point system 
mentioned is applied, then the winner will be 
the team with the greater net yardage. 

2. The semi-final sites will be determined 
in the odd numbered years by the winners 
in Region 1 and Region 3, and the even num- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



bered years by the winners in Region 2 and 
Region 4. The site for the final game in each 
class will be determined by the Board of 
Control. 

3. The proceeds of the semi-final games in 
each class will be used to defray the expenses 
of the visiting team, officials, trophies for 
the regional winners, and other incidental 
expenses. Net profit or loss will be shared by 
the competing schools. If no agreement on 
the visiting team expenses can be reached, 
the following shall be allowed: transporta- 
tion, 50c per mile, round trip; maximum 
number of seven meals for thirty-eight per- 
sons at $1.50; lodging, maximum of two 
nights. 

4. The proceeds of the final games in each 
class shall accrue to the K.H.S.A.A. after the 
necessary expenses have been paid. Expenses 
for the traveling team shall be the same as 
given above, and a team not requiring trans- 
portation, meals, or lodging shall receive 
$100.00 for miscellaneous expenses. 

The classes and regions for 1960 are as 
follows : 

Class AAA 

Region I — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee, Trinity. 

Region II — Butler, Durrett, Eastern, Fair- 
dale, Fern Creek, Pleasure Ridge Park, Sen- 
eca, Southern, Valley, Waggener. 
Class AA 

Region I — Bowling Green, Caldwell Coun- 
tv, Crittenden County, Daviess County, 
Franklin-Simpson, Henderson, Henderson 
County. Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Mayfield, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Paducah 
Tilghman, Trigg County, Warren County. 

Region II — Bryan Station, Clark County, 
Danville, Dunbar (Lexington), Elizabeth- 
town, Franklin County, Henry Clay, Ken- 
tucky Military Institute, Lafayette, LaRue 
County, Lincoln Institute, Madison-Model, 
Oldham County, St. Joseph, Somerset, Tomp- 
kinsville. 

Region HI — Ashland, Boone County, 
Campbell County, Dixie Height.s, Highlands, 
Holmes, Louisa, McKell, Newport, Newport 
Catholic, Russell, Wurtland. 

Region IV — Belfry, Bell County, Corbin, 
Cumberland, Evarts, Fleming-Neon, Hall, 
Hazard, Hazel Green, Jenkins, Knox Central, 
Middlesboro, Napier, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, 
Wheelwright, Whitesburg. 
Class A 

Region I — Attucks, Douglass (Henderson), 
Douglass (Murray), Fulton, High Street, 



Lincoln (Franklin), Lincoln (Paducah), Mor- 
ganfield, Murray, Providence, Russellville, 
Sturgis, Western (Owensboro). 

Region II — Anderson, Bardstown, Bate, 
Campbellsville, Catholic Country Day, Ft. 
Knox, Frankfort, Georgetown, Glasgow, 
Harrodsburg, Jessamine County, Lancaster, 
Lebanon, Lincoln (Stanford), Louisville 
Country Day, Metcalfe County, Old Ken- 
tucky Home, Shelbyville, Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Stanford, Versailles. 

Region HI — Beechwood, Bellevue, Carlisle, 
Catlettsburg, Cynthiana, Dayton, DuBois, 
Irvine, Lloyd, Ludlow, Millersburg Military 
Institute, Mt. Sterling, Paintsville, Paris, 
Raceland, Western (Paris). 

Region IV — Barbourville, Benham, Black 
Star, Buckhorn, Dilce Combs, East Main 
Street (Lynch), Elkhorn City, Harlan, Leslie 
County, Lily, London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, 
Pineville, Rosenwald (Harlan), Wallins, West 
Main Street (Lynch), Williamsburg. 



A Grave Challenge 
Facing America 

Editors Note: Mr. Richard Lee Gentry, who is 
Supervisor of Health, Safety and Physical Education 
in the Department of Education,, sent the K.H.S.A.A. 
recently a statement of the national organization to 
which he belongs. We are glad to reprint this article, 
which is the official statement of the Society of State 
Directors of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Society of State Directors of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation is con- 
cerned, as are other thinking Americans, over 
the threat of conflicting ideologies to the se- 
curity of our nation and to world peace. The 
Society recognizes that, to counteract effec- 
tively any possible aggressive move in this 
direction by any foreign power, we must pre- 
pare more and better scientists, mathema- 
ticians, and statesmen. It commends, and 
supports, educationally sound efforts to im- 
prove school and college curricula for the 
attainment of such goals. However, in our 
anxiety and haste to achieve these objectives, 
we must not lose sight of other equally im- 
portant purposes of education and, thus, do 
irreparable harm to what is generally ac- 
claimed as the greatest system of universal 
education the world has ever witnessed; a 
system so necessary to the survival of our 
democratic way of life. Any action or pro- 
gram designed to favor a selected group of 
students to the neglect of others, or curtail 
essential educational experiences for all, is 
deplored. 

We call attention to the complex and dy- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Page Eleven 



namic forces at work today in the United 
States. We reiterate the belief that educa- 
tion as a major social institution should be 
responsive to the needs and opportunities of 
a changing culture. Some of the significant 
cultural developments, with their attendant 
problems, which produce a tremendous im- 
pact on American schools include: (1) The 
ever-increasing population; (2) Increasing 
urbanization; (3) The rising standard of 
living and increasing leisure; (4) Scientific 
and technological developments; (5) Political 
and ideological differences ; and (6) Chang- 
ing problems of health. 

Such social forces exert tremendous ef- 
fect upon the health of individuals and, thus, 
to the strength and welfare of the nation. 
Therefore, the Society expresses serious con- 
cern over the failure of schools and colleges 
to provide adequate experiences for all stu- 
dents in the areas of health and safety edu- 
ucation, physical education, including ath- 
letics and "off-the-job living." This Society 
reaffirms the statement of the American As- 
sociation for Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation on "Fitness of Youth" and calls 
particular attenton to that portion which 
reads : 

"Modern man is confronted with a critical 
choice. Either he includes valid physical ac- 
tivity in his life or he suffers inevitable 
losses. If he chooses to remain fit, he must 
elect those practices and activities that will 
lead to that end." 

The Society calls upon all citizens in gen- 
eral, and educators in particular, to place high 
priority on education for health and fitness. 
It recommends that at least a daily period in 
the school curriculum be devoted to health 
and safety education and physical education 
for all students; that adequate facilities and 
qualified personnel in sufficient number be 
provided for these programs in all schools 
and colleges; and that education facilities 
and personnel be utilized to the greatest de- 
gree possible for community leisure-time 
activities. Placing great emphasis on the im- 
portance of leadership, supervision and co- 
ordination for these separate but related 
programs in producing best results, the So- 
ciety urges (1) school districts to organize 
these programs into one administrative unit 
under the leadership of a qualified person 
on the chief school administrator's central 
office staff, and (2) state education depart- 
ments to provide greater assistance to school 
and college officials in improving programs 
through the employment of state directors 



of health, physical education and recreation 
with sufficient staffs to fulfill properly this 
responsibility. 

The Society is convinced that, regardless 
of the advances made in scientific, social or 
political fields in the years ahead, personal 
fitness will remain as our most priceless 
asset. Fitness has been defined as that state 
which characterizes the degree to which a 
person is able to function — physically, men- 
tally, socially and spiritually. As such, it is 
basic to all our endeavors whether they be 
intellectual achievement, production of ma- 
terial goods, resisting an enemy attack, or 
living happily and productively. Only as our 
children, youth and adults develop and main- 
tain fitness, and become imbued with the 
understanding and appreciation of the values 
of fitness for living can we hope to survive 
as individuals or as a nation. 



MORE FOOTBALL 

The bewhiskered old putation that football 
undermines the educational structure is al- 
most as extinct as the seven-diamond de- 
fense, but it does pop up occasionally in the 
fulminations of some of our double-domes. 

So you can imagine our surprise and de- 
light upon stumbling across the following 
critique in the fine sport section of THE 
NEWARK (N. J.) EVENING NEWS. Writ- 
ten NOT by a coach or sportswriter but one 
of the book world's supreme egg-heads — 
editor, essayist, and critic John Chamberlain 
— the piece scores some powerful points for 
the grid game, and is well-worth the perusal 
of every educator in the land. 

"A premise of virtually all complaints about 
overemphasis on college football is that the 
sport is incompatible with good scholarship. 

"Far be it from this reporter to say there 
is nothing to the charge that colleges recruit 
their athletes by offering them special in- 
ducements. But the idea that sports have 
had a pernicious influence on scholastic 
standards is ridiculous on its face. Only a few 
students play the taxing team sports — and 
the incentive for these few to stay off pro- 
bation in order to remain eligible for the big 
games must be great. 

"For the rest, if Johnny can't read it is 
because he hasn't learned phonics by the 
second grade. If he can't write, it is because 
the 'true-false' question has replaced the es- 
say in his classes. And if he can't apply logic 
and realism to the problems of economics and 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1960 



Announcing Coverage 
For K.H.S.A.A. Sports Officials 

PROVIDES ACCIDENTAL DEATH, DISMEMBERMENT 
AND ACCIDENT MEDICAL EXPENSE BENEFITS DUE 
TO INJURIES SUSTAINED WHILE OFFICIATING A 
HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE FOOTBALL GAME OR 
WHILE TRAVELING TO OR FROM SUCH GAME. 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^<4c KuU^JUh, Qomp444Uf. GENERAL 



AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Spec. Agt. CHARLES G. PRICE 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



politics, it is because his textbooks have 
ceased to tell him that things operate by 
natural, not political, law. 

"For my sins, I have read a goodly number 
of economics textbooks. Most of them offer 
a hodgepodge of mutually contradictory 
theories. Inflation, for example, is deplored 
— but the political actions which make for in- 
flation are considered necessary and right. 
Caught between the incompatibles of the 
textbooks, the student often loses all con- 
tact with a cause-and-effect world. 

"In football, this does not happen. On the 
playing field a cause is always demonstrably 
followed by an effect: if a backfield man 
misses his signal, or starts moving too soon, 
the result is an unholy mess. Day after day 
throughout the autumn, on a hundred fields, 
such things as the relationship of the input 
of energy and skill to the output of succes.s- 
ful achievement get their inexorable demon- 
stration. 

"There can be no fudging, no faking, no 
disregard of fundamentals, no day-dreaming, 
if one aspires to play on a well organized and 
well drilled team. 

"In .short, athletics teaches many valuable 
things, ranging from discipline to the proper 
adaptation of means to ends. Stupid boys 
don't get on in football ; the game is too com- 



plex for that. The coaches, unprotected by 
academic tenure, must deliver, too. 

"Fai- from being overemphasized, football 
may be the schools' most enduring contact 
with the world of discipline, of sharp think- 
ing, of a demonstrable connection between 
what one puts into a thing and what one gets 
out of it at the other end. Let's have more 
of it." 

— Scholastic Coach. 



Approved and Certified Football Officials 

Certified Officials — Howard Bennett, George W. 
Brown, E. C. Caiman, Jr., John S. Crostwaite, Jr., 
Jack H. Durkin, Carl Elovitz, Robert H. Florence, W. 
H. Gammon, Newell Hadden, Bart Hagerman, Frank 
Heinze, John G. Heinze, Fletcher Holeman, Bernard 
Johnson, Carl Lawson, Bob McColIuni, Edgar McNabb, 
E. B. May, Jr., William A. Mordica, Bill Nau, Doug 
Noland, K. F. Schmitt, John H. Shaw, Clifton Stone, 
Don C. Sullivan, Ray Varner. 

Approved Officials — Charles J. Baker, Clarence T. 
Bell, Homer Blanton, Jerry F. Boyles, John Canter, 
David A. Carlson, Bill Craft, Clyde E. Davis, John W. 
Forbes, Jr., Robert L. Fortney, Jim Graham, William 
M. Holbrook, Kenneth Kerr, Morris B. Lancaster, Wil- 
liam M. Mayhew, H. L. Mayo, Jim Melmige, Bobby 
E. Mullins, John E. Renfro, Alfred J. Rhatigan, Dewey 
Sizemore, Harry Stephenson, Frank M. Thomas, John 
P. Wilson. 



DO WE 

HAVE IT? 

WE SURE DO! and how! 

Our stocks this year are the same top quality for 
which HUNTS is now well known — -nationally-dis- 
tributed, nationally advertised, preferred-quality 
brands. 

CRAMER and BIKE Trainers Supplies — 
KING O'SHEA, GENERAL and SOUTHERN Tail- 
ored Uniforms— PENNSYLVANIA Rubber Sports 
Equipment — CONVERSE Shoes — HILLERICH & 
BRADSBY Bats— IMPERIAL Sweaters — GRALL, 
DODGE and NOBLE Trophies and Medals— LYON 
METAL, AMERICAN, GENERAL and NARRA- 
GANSETT Gymnasium and Playground Equipment 
—MASTER Combination Locks— AALCO and POL- 
VONITE Mats— NELSON, WIGWAM and ADLER 
Socks— E. R. MOORE and WILTON Gym Clothing. 

Write us about your needs — we'll give one day serv- 
ice. For extra-quick service or information — pick 
up your phone and ask for HUNTS - CH 7-1941, 
Mayfield, Kentucky. 

For "on-the-ground-service", HUNTS school repre- 
sentatives will contact you during the year as usual : 

ROY BOYD - salesman, West Kentucky and West 
Tennessee 

JIM MITCHELL - salesman, Southern Illinois, West 
Tennessee 

ED HENDLEY - salesman, Kentucky 

GARY ATKINS - retail manager 

C. A. BYRN, JR. - at the phone 



FAIR-PLAY 

Figurgram Scoreboards 



LEAVITT 

Bleachers 



MACGREGOR 

Sports Equipment 



NISSEN 

Trampolines 



PROGRAM AIDS 

Coaching- and Award 
Aids 



POWERS 

Athletic Uniforms 



RIDDELL 

Shoes and Helmets 



SPALDING 

Sports Equipment 



SPANJIAN 

Football and Basketball 
Uniforms 



W. J. VOIT 

Rubber Sports Equipment 




HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



We SHipTiie DaV'Vou BuV'/^ 




!$ntcltif e Has The 
SWEATERS! 

CLASS AND HONOR SWEATERS 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, lO-Da/ Delivery 





V-NECK SWEATERS 

No. 1030— A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $12.45 

No. 58V-W — Another Sand sweater in solid white. Choice 
of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular as athletic 
awards. White only; each $9.15 

No. 6V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $9.75 



COAT SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Dennanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $13.65 

No. 530 J — A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each ...$11.50 



No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each $10.65 



Reversible Honor Jackets 

Write us for our Catalog with 

Special School Prices 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.35; 8" leHers $2.05; chenille bars, 40c each; 
chenille chevrons, 45c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and requires three weeks for delivery. 



^^UTCLIFFE CO. 

^^.LOUISVILLE I, KENTUCKYj 




Hiqh School Athkfe 



FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP TIME IS HERE AGAIN 




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The 1960 K.H.S.A.A. Football Championships mark the culmination of a fine season, with 
more interest than ever in high school football. Champions will be named on ThanksgiTing Day 
(Classes A and A A) and on December 3 (Class AAA). 




OfficialOrgan of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NOVEMBER - 19BD 






Medical Aspects of 
High School Sports 

Editor's Note: The following talk was given by 
Harold A. Meyer of Ohio before one of the sessions of 
the 1960 National Federation Annual Meeting. 

Growth of Sports Participation 

In the past few years high school sports 
have not only increased in kind but also in 
the number of participants. In the not-too- 
distant past, a sport was represented by the 
varsity, composed mainly of upper classmen, 
a far contrast from today's practice. Many 
schools now support a varsity - junior var- 
sity or reserve - freshman or junior high - 
and in a good many localities have extended 
the athletic program into the elementary 
grades. This, of course, means that many 
more boys have the opportunity to play a 
sport and, by the same token, be exposed to 
possible injury. 

Need for Medical Examinations 

Before a boy of any age, and let me empha- 
size the any, be permitted t o engage in a 
given sport, a physical examination by a 
medical doctor is a must. This practice is 
quite prevalent at the high school level but is 
quite often overlooked at the lower grade 
level. . ,,^j 

In some instances, examinations are given 
annually, usually at the beginning of the Fall 
sports season. Much can be said, however, 
for the need of an examination before the 
youngster competes in any sport. This may 
result in some all-around athletes being ex- 
amined possibly two or three times in a 
school year. With a growing youngster, and 
the demands placed upon him, this would 
certainly not be considered as overly cau- 
tious. The physical structure is changing 
constantly and a condition that is favorable 
for football may be changed considerably by 
the time track or baseball season rolls 
around. 

Proper Equipment 

The development of proper playing equip- 
ment has progressed a great deal in recent 
years. A piece of felt sewed to heavy 
leather, that many of you can recall, is a far 
cry from the foam rubber and cantilever 
style pads of today. 

The football helmet, with its suspension- 
type support and nose guard, gives the 
wearer a lot more protection but certainly in 
some cases has become quite an instrument 
of destruction. Some work has been done 
towards padding the hard plastic shell with 



a softer substance for the protection of the 
other player. 

The sponge-type pad for wrestling, lighter 
and better built equipment in all sports,, base- 
ball helmets, steel vaulting poles, rubber dis- 
cuses are just a few of the efforts made to 
provide more safety for our athletes. 
Importance of Preseason Practice 

Proper conditioning is of vital importance 
for the safety of the participants. To insure 
the proper amount of time for this condition- 
ing program, some states do not allow any so- 
called practice games before the season's 
first game. Others require a certain number 
of practice sessions before they may be per- 
mitted to engage in any interschool scrim- 
mages. The reasoning is fairly obvious - you 
must have time to get youngsters ready to 
play under game conditions. 

The practice of having team members con- 
dition themselves during the summer prior 
to the opening of the season is good but does 
have a dangerous element. Can you assume 
that all team members have reached the 
same level of conditioning and work them all 
accordingly ? 

Proper Coaching 

The coach plays two important roles in 
this problem of athletic injuries. He must 
first coach proper playing technics and use 
boys only when they are ready and capable 
of playing. 

Secondly, he must have some knowledge 
of athletic injuries, cause, effect and possible 
treatment. He should be able, to some ex- 
tent, to determine the seriousness of the in- 
jury and call in medical advice when needed. 

The products of our colleges are better 
trained than formerly and apparently high 
schools are getting a higher level of coach- 
ing than heretofore. 

Athletic Injury Conferences 
In some areas. Athletic Injury Ck)nfer- 
ences have been used in an attempt to fur- 
ther decrease the amount and seriousness of 
athletic injuries. 

In Ohio our Association, in cooperation 
with the State Medical Association and the 
County Medical Society where the conference 
was held, sponsored four such conferences in 
the past year. The attitude of the medical 
groups involved was very cordial and one of 
complete cooperation. They furnished all 
medical members for the conferences and 
made every effort to secure personnel who 
would have a wide background in the treat- 
ment of athletic injuries. Dr. Robert Mur- 
phy, the Ohio State team physician, appeared 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXIII— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1960 



.00 Per Year 



What Direction 
Interscholastic Athletics? 

Editor's Note: Dr. Charles Ritch, Jr., New Hamp- 
shire Commissioner of Education, delivered the follow- 
ing speech to the membership of the New Hampshire 
Interscholastic Athletic Association at the 1960 Annual 
Meeting of the Association. 

The passage of time brings about many 
changes. Less than a century ago we lived 
in a horse and buggy age. Our population 
naturally had more based on such conditions. 
Today the picture has changed appreciably 
and observably. This change is reflected on 
all facets of our national life. Today, travel 
is an accepted pattern. Today we move from 
place to place with little or no effort and dis- 
tances have shrunk as the motor car has in- 
creased in its efficiency, not to mention the 
influence of air travel. 

Strangely enough in one way, and yet not 
so strange in another, the American auto- 
mobile and school bus have had a far reach- 
ing effect upon the American public schools. 
Less than 100 years ago interscholastic ath- 
letics were practically impossible and non- 
existent. Each secondary school was practi- 
cally a self-sufficient entity and frequently 
quite isolated. Interscholastic athletic com- 
petitions were exceedingly infrequent, if at 
all. 

Just look at the scene today. What a 
dramatic change has taken place. Instead of 
being isolated islands, our secondary schools 
have become centers of activities which 
sometime are really national in scope as far 
as visitations and competitions are concern- 
ed. This extreme turn of events has been 
caused primarily because of our pi'esent ease 
of transportation. Today it is quite common- 
place for interscholastic teams to travel to 
competitions within a 25 mile radius or more. 

All of a sudden, so it seems, many school 
activities have taken on new emphasis. This 
is true especially in the area of athletics. As 
our society has become more mobile, our 
public school systems have become more 
complex. This complexity is well in evidence 
in the area of interscholastic athletics. 



Early in its growth the interscholastic 
program in practically all schools developed 
somewhat like a child — from infancy to ma- 
turity. The growth in some instances has 
been just as stormy as that found in the lives 
of some young people. Lack of good counsel 
and reasonable discipline have permitted 
some interscholastic athletic programs to 
develop into monsters which threatened the 
very existence of their parent organization, 
namely, the school instructional program. 

Sober thought on the subject quickly 
comes to the conclusion that the principal 
purpose of any secondary school is to train 
its young people in the academic pursuits of 
their chosen field. We should never lose 
sight of that truism. 

In my opinion, no interscholastic athletic 
program should be so intense in its purpose 
as to lose sight of the prime pui-pose of a 
high school experience for the young people 
involved. But, in the same breath, I must 
add that interscholastic athletic programs 
can and should be an integral part of a well- 
rounded high school program. 

To me, the academic program of our high 
schools is the "bread and butter" part of 
those schools and is their reason for existing. 
The interscholastic athletic program, or any 
other extracurricular activity, is somewhat 
like honey or jam placed with our bread and 
butter to make that combination still more 
enjoyable and valuable than if the additive 
were not present. 

It has been my privilege to have had an 
opportunity to review quite carefully several 
pieces o f literature published by the 
N.H.I.A.A. - all the way from the 1959-60 
Handbook to the periodic news sheets. I can 
truthfully say I h a v e been favorably im- 
pressed with a number of things. For in- 
stance, I have sensed that this organization 
was created in order to meet a very real 
need ; namely that of guaranteeing to all con- 
cerned a reasonable pattern of interscholas- 
tic athletics which did not exploit children, 
did not disrupt the administrative operation 
of our school systems and, above all, did op- 
erate by definite "rules of the game" which 
have been created by representative action 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



NOVEMBER, 1960 



VOL. xxni— NO. 4 



nthly, except Ju 



nd July, by the Kentucky 



Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Vice-President W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1958-621, Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-621. Louisville; Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-641, Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



omtnissionet s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1960 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Foot- 
ball) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination \vill be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 5, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state associations, are not eligi- 
ble to take the test. Those interested should 
advise the State Office immediately in order 
that necessary arrangements can be made 
with the school administrators who will sup- 
ervise the taking of the exam. Officials liv- 
ing in Kentucky need not suggest the name 
of an examiner. The "approved" rating does 
not carry foi-ward from year to year, but 
mu.st be earned each year. After an official 
has received the "certified" rating, he keeps 
this rating by attending clinics without hav- 
ing to continue to take the exam each year. 

Rule Changes in Swimming 

The following rule changes will be in effect 
for interscholastic swimming during 
1960-61: 

1. Pool and meet equipment defined. 
(Rule II) 

2. Ater two successive false starts, all con- 
testants involved in a subsequent false start 
in that race shall be disqualified. If it is a 
relay race, the relay team shall be disquali- 



ied. However, such team or contestant must 
still swim the event. (Rule III, Section 4— 
only major change for 1960-61) 

3. Ballot values for official times clarified. 
(Rule V, Section 6-b) 

4. Representative must be present at 
scratdh meeting. (Rule VI, Section 3-b) 

5. Execution of the dive clarified. (Rule 
XII) 

6. New dive 514 added to Diving Tables. 
Former 514, 515, and 516 become 515, 516, 
and 517. (Diving Tables) 

Athletic Institute Film 

Two athletic institute films. Careers in 
Physical Education and Careers in Recrea- 
tion, qualify for purchase through National 
Defense Education Act funds. Herbert 
Steiner, Maryland Public School Athletic As- 
sociation, Department of Education, Balti- 
more, Maryland, and Miss Ruth Byler, State 
Department of Education, Hartford, C o n - 
necticut, were suecessft,! in obtaining these 
films by placing a request with the Guidance 
Department to order the films through the 
National Defense Education Act channels. 
College and University physical education di- 
rectors may find it possible to purchase 
prints of the films mentioned through their 
Guidance and Career departments. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 

(List Conipile(i November 1) 



Alva ton 
Blaine 

Clay 
Douglass 

(Lexington) 
Dunbar 

(Morganfield) 
Ferguson 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Foundation 

(Berea) 
Franklin County 

(Frankfort) 
Holy Family 

(Ashland) 
Johns Creek 

(Pikeville) 
Lebanon 
Lincoln 

(Middlesboro) 
Lincoln 

(Stanford) 
Livingston 
Lone Oak 

(Paducah) 
McKee 
Maytown 

(Langley) 
Pine Mountain 
Pleasureville 



Rosenwald 

(Providence) 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 
St. Augustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Benedict 

(Lebanon Junction) 
.St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. Joseph 

(Bowling Green) 
St. Mary's Academy 

(Paducah) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 
St. Patrick 

(Maysville) 
Seneca 

(Louisville) 
Simmons 

(Versailles) 
Todd County Training 

(Elkton) 
Waggener 

(Louisville) 
Wayland 

Willisbiu-g 
William Grant 

(Covington) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



Page Three 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met in the 
K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, on Saturday 
morning October 22, 1960. The meeting was 
called to order by President Louis Litchfield 
at 9:30, with all Board members, Commiss- 
ioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes of 
the July 30th meeting we waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies of 
these minutes. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

Chairman W. B. Jones of the Trophy Com- 
mittee reported that his committee had met 
and had selected district and regional basket- 
ball trophies which would be used in the 
forthcoming 1961 tournaments. Mr. Jones 
said that the trophy specifications were now 
being prepared for the bidders. 

Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
discussed the forthcoming football clhamp- 
ionships and the current won and lost records 
of some of the leading teams in the various 
football regions. The Commissioner stated 
that the final Class A and Class AA champ- 
ionship games were scheduled to be played 
in Lexington on Thanksgiving Day, with the 
Class AAA championship game to be played 
in Louisville on Saturday, December 3. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the next meeting of the Board 
of Control be held in Lexington on December 
22, 1960. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner recommended that Ed- 
gar McNabb and Joe Ohr be named respect- 
ively delegate and alternate to the forth- 
coming meeting of the National Federation 
Football Committee. Robert P. Forsythe 
moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that the 
recommendation of the Commissioner be ac- 
cepted and approved. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Mr. 
Roy Mundorff , Basketball Hall of Fame Com- 
mitteeman, requesting that Kentucky bas- 
ketball fans be given an opportunity to con- 
tribute to the Basketball Hall of Fame at 
games played during Hall of Fame Week, 
scheduled for February 6-11, 1961. W. B. 
Jones moved, seconded by Robert P. For- 
sythe, that the Board of Control go on record 
as being in favor of the Basketball Hall of 



Fame movement. K. G. Gillaspie moved, 
seconded by Jack Dawson, that the Commis- 
sioner be authorized to send out a letter to 
member schools, suggesting a minimum con- 
tribution of $5.00 from each school, with all 
contributions being on a volunteer basis. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner brought to the atten- 
tion of the Board all of the evidence which 
he had accumulated in connection with the 
Lloyd "Mickey" Gibson case. The parents 
of this boy late in August had moved from 
Carr Creek to Hazard, and a charge of undue 
influence in connection with the move had 
been made against the Hazard High School. 
The Commissioner stated that the evidence 
in the case, which consisted mainly of an in- 
vestigation by Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield, and of affidavits and signed 
statements, was contradictory at almost 
every point; and that his decision was that 
undue influence had not been established in 
the Lloyd Gibson case. Since no penalty was 
involved in the case, the Board concurred 
with the opinion of the Commissioner that 
this was not in reality an appeal case, but 
the members of the Board were willing to 
hear all of the evidence presented by each 
side in the controversy. The Commissioner 
told the Board that, if it was the opinion of 
the Board members that he had interpreted 
the Undue Influence Rule incorrectly, he 
would consider reversing his decision. The 
Board members thought that this was a case 
of rules interpretation, which falls under the 
duties of the Commissioner. Attention was 
called to the fact that By-Law 10 provides 
that the Commissioner shall be the sole 
judge as to what constitutes undue influence. 
It was the general opinion of the members of 
the Board that the ruling that the Commis- 
sioner had made was the only possible one 
which could have been made under the cir- 
cumstances, based on the evidence which had 
been presented. 

The Commissioner stated that it mi^jht be 
necessary for the K.H.S.A.A. to borrow some 
money prior to the time of receiving 1961 
State Basketball Tournament money, with 
this plan probably more advisable than that 
of selling bonds or transferring money from 
savings accounts. Jack Dawson moved, sec- 
onded by Robert P. Forsythe, that the Board 
of Control authorize Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford to borrow during the fiscal year 
1960-61, for the purpose of paying current 
bills and salaries, an amount not to ex- 
ceed twenty thousand dollars ($20,000). The 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



motion was carried unanimously. 

K G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson that all bills of the Association for 
the period beginning July 30, 1960, and end- 
ing October 21, 1960, be allowed. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone nuumber is given for an official Usted it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numberT are given, the first number is that of the home phone 

^. '^r.^^jy'^OS ^So^^"c.a'^;,-&'^Ve/-J^^-T..O. 

r^^„^ H F Ir I'B Maxwelton Heights, Middlesboro, 413 
Jon"' ?au^;' Routl 4, Box 26, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4502, Ft. 
Lee. Cha'^rLrj^'^t Scott Ave.. Lexington. 2-3003. Versailles. 

Lewis. H^ract* N., P. O. Box 865, Huntington W.Va 
MT^Iemore Jack, 4531 R verview Ave.. Louisville 11. SP 4-5-ub 
McQuXng. Gerald, 2011 South Lombard, Evansv.lle, Indiana. 

GR 6-6941 
Maggard, Kenneth. Neon, 4881 „ . ^ .,, .,.„ ,„,-• 

Selbee WillVam^^-. 3336 Springhaven, Catlettsburg. North 

284, Ashland EA 4-8282 ,,,ciro jilfiin 

Smith, Richard T., 1201 Jefferson, Paducah, 444-6159, 444-6311, 

S«.ope. Wniiam'w., 438 PHce Road, Lexington, 5-2458 2-2220 
Taylor D. C. P. O. Box 176, Benham, 848-2284 848-5406 
Tharne Robert L., 212 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-46 a 
Trowbridge, Joseph N., 221 P. G. Noll, Newport, HE l-"08 
Wilkerson, Benjamin P., 5307 Washington, Evansville 15. Ind.. 

GR6-4560. UL 3-3381 , , ,. r. » --niA 

Williams, Smythe Jack, 315 Murrell, Frankfort, CA, -,016 
Witten^urg, Howard, 1723 Oakland, Portsmouth. Ohio, EL 

3-4001 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone nuumber is given for an official listejl it is 
the l^ome Dhone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numberT are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
AbTrnathy f;eorg" U.. 324 N. Elm. Henderson. VA 7-1322 
Alexander. Donald. P. O. Box 583, Warsaw. JO 7-60 il. 

Allen, James W "Dink", 3444 Monel Avenue, Huntington, W. 

Baele. John. 7144 Garden Road. Cincinnati, Ohio, SY 1-5563, 

Bagby, Rod W., 710 Woodlawn, Louisville 15, EM 8-8033 
BaMard. Jack H., 128 Pine Street, Barbourville, LI 6-4482, 

Baughn, E. L. (Tug). Johnson Blvd., Route 4, Murray, PI 

Bisig George Carl, 1417 Nightingale, Louisville, ME 7-4306 
Black Robert N., 201 W. Clay, Clinton. OL 3-6432. OL 3-3861 
Blackturn. Tennyson R., Box 2157. Williamson. W. Va. 
Bocook. George. 1906 Walnut Street. Kenova. W. Va. 
Boyd, Tommy, 4105 Stoneview Dr., Louisville, TW 5-2917, 

JU 2-2351 
Bovd Jerry, 215 W. Blair Ave.. Richmond, 3151, 583 
Boyles Paul E., Box 513, Russell, Grand 161. 20. Ext. 258 
Biadshaw, Bill. Shakertown Road. Burgin. 748-5265 
Branham Curtis. Jr.. Zebulon. GE 7-4814 
Bridges Bcnnie E.. North Middletown. NM 4403, NM 4535 
Brooks James A., Box 120. Betsv Layne, GR 8-2366, GR 8-2270 

or GE 2-2114 
Brown, James W., 102 Bristol Drive. Richmond. 1568, 177B 
Brummctt, Bill G. 8124 Burkhart Ave., Cincinnati 37, Ohio, 

VA 1-3874 
Bunn. Harold, Route No. 1, Huntington, W. Va. 
Butcher, Paul, 145"/. Park St.. Pikcville, GE 7-7529. GE 7-914d 
Cain, Ronnie. 1312 Old Mill Rd., Lyndon, TW 5-0567 (Bus.) 



Caldwell. James A.. 14 Chesapeake. Newport, HI 1-1626, 

EX 7-2354 
Cantrell, Hubert E., Campton. NO 8-3458. NO 8-345S 
Caple. Harold, 318 Popuar. Ludlow. AX 1-6491 
Carpenter. Leonard F.. Sublett. FI 9-3404 
Cartee. Ralph. Jr.. Olive Hill. FA 6-4061. FA 6-4591 
Cassell. Curtis. 1819 Hilton Ave., Ashland. EA 4-7784, EA 

4-5933 
Castle. Quentin. Nippa. CY 7-3756 

Catlett. David L.. 1218 Arcade Avenue. Louisville. EM 3-4780 
Cecil. John O.. Jr.. 1210 S. Green, Glasgow, OL 1-2410 
Chambers. Bill. 6329 Aracoma Road. Huntington. W. Va. 
Chappel. Robert, P. O. Box 32, Crab Orchard, EL 5-7721, 

EL 5-2023 
Clary. Kenneth. 626 Powell. Henderson. VA 7-3320 
Cobb. Mike. Route 2. Central City. 1427-J 
Conley. Tom W.. Route 23, Paintsville, CY 7-3725 
Cox, Ralph, 404 Spruce Street, Benham, Cumberland 589-4792 
Cox. Rufus. A.. 223 Rutter. Earlington. DU 3-4001. DU 3-3301 
Crank. Buck. 2912 Moore St.. Ashland. EA 5-3708 
Crawford, Donald Ray. 114 Ilhardt Avenue. Nicholasville. 

TU 5-4751 (Bus. I 
C/ocetti. Dom, 8002 Red Cedar Wav. Louisville. WO 9-1895, 

WE 7-2300 
Current. Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr.. Lexington. 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Davenport, Robert B.. Shakertown Road. Burgin, 748-5204, 

748-5180 
Davenport. Sam C, Jr.. P. O. Box 7. Jellico. Tenn. HE 4-6400, 

GA 4-6555 
Davidson. Danny J., 400R 3rd Ave., Chesapeake, Ohio. 7-2248, 

HA 9-1361 
Davis, Bunny. 594 W. Lexington St.. Danville. 236-2606, 

236-2200 
Davis, Curtis, 1119 E. Burnett. Louisville, ME 4-4959, JU 2-3511 
Davis. Donald. 69 Linden, Fort Thomas. HI 1-7641. CO 1-2980 
DeGroote. James. 1539 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-5497, HA 5-6211, Ext. 214 
Demunbrun, Murphy M.. 214 Wedgewood. Glasgow. 2630. 5165 
Derrick, Charles A.. 3 Adrian Ct.. Newport. JU 1-7301. 

PA 1-1055 
Dial. Charles R.. 3309 Monel Avenue. Huntington. W. Va. 
Dunaway. Heber. Richmond 
Duncan, Earl S.. 10,007 Taylorsville Road. Jeffersontown. 

AN 7-1478, TW 5-0568 
Edwards. Hugh R.. Route 2, Hardyville. JA 4-2533, LA 8-2187 
Fannin. Benny J., Betsy Layne, Harold, 6R-86392 
Farlee. Harold, 2720 Field Avenue, Louisville, TW 3-3201 
Finley, Sam, 1505 Oleanda Court, Louisville, EM 8-5746. 

JU 4-9003 
Flagg. Robert A., 3212 Ainslie Way, Louisville 20, GL 8-6896, 

TW 5-3452 
Floyd. Raymond, 205 Huffaker Ave.. Somerset. 679-2443, 

678-4458 
Ford, Joe. 600 Hillside, Mayfield, CH 7-5SS6 
Fulkerson, Raymond, 9212 Cornflower, Valley Station, WE 

7-4158, ME 7-1477 
Gaither, Gene, P. O. Box 103. Beaver Dam. BR 4-4357. BR 

4-3256 
Gilbert. Ralph V.. 4029 Custer Drive. Fort Knox. 4-5968. 4-7422 
Gill. Joe, 455 Marimon Ave.. Harrodsburg. 734-2729 
Gilman. Ronald. Delbarton. W. Va. 

Oodbey. Truman. Middleburg. Liberty SU 7-4013. SU 7-2852 
Goddis. George M., 102 W. 5th St.. Owensboro. MU 3-8282 

(Bus. I 
Golden. Mrs. Billy Joe. 568 E. Mail 
(Joodall. Walter J.. 820 Park Av, 

CO 1-3133 
Grace. H. E.. Jr.. 125 Maxwelton Heights. Middlesboro. 413 
Greene. Jerry I,.. 431 Bamberger Road. Lexington. 3-1566 
Groves. (Mendal D.. 408 K. 18th Street. Hopkinsville. TU 5-3567, 

TU 6-4431 
Gutzwiller. Bob. Box 1504 Norway Avenue. Huntington, W. Va. 
Hale, John. Route 1. Box 118, Baxter. 2131 

Hall. Bobby. 317 Riverside Dr., Russell, Oak 257, Wurtland 763 
Hall, Mac, Chapmanville. W. Va. 
Hardin. Don G.. Morehead, ST 4-5653 
Hardin. Hack H.. 1105 "B" Street. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Harris, Gene, Route 2, Box 113, Corbin, 2724 
Harris. Jerry Lee. Route 1, Rockhold. Corbin, 1064-J-l 
Hart. Ray, Sharpsburg, CH 7-2711 (Bus.) 

Harville, Robert, Elizabethtown High School. Elizabethtown 
Hayes. Douglas. J,, 2nd Street. Morehead. ST 4-5865. ST 4-4381 
Haynes. John. 416 Clay. Henderson. VA 7-5137 
Henson. Tony C. Route 4. Mayfield. NR 6-3721 
Hewling, Franklin C, 1126 Orchard, Newport, CO 1-7380, 

GA 1-3700, Ext. 6 
Higgins. Bobby D., Box 102, Scbrec, TE 5-7672 
Hill. Jimmie. Box 19. Verne 

Hinkle, Melvin B.. 21 Cameron. Paris, 1343, 220 
Hodges. Holbcrt. 516 N. Hill, London. VO 4-6673. VI 3-2265 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holt. Robert E.. 60(1 Sanderson Drive. Hopkinsville. TU 6-1738, 

TU 6-1207 
Hooks. Robert. Wheelwright 

Howard. Ledger. 1311 Allen St., Owensboro. MU 3-0511 
Huffman. Charles E.. Stewart Ave.. Worthington 
Hummer Irby. 206 College. Hodgenville. EL 8-3009. EL 8-3000 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hutchens. Jim, Box 103, EL 3-7363 
Isaacs, John F., 1337 E. Cooper Dr., Lexington, 6-4887 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



Page Five 



Ison, Glennon B., 425 Woodlawn Avenue, rlemingsburg, 

VI 5-6461, VI 5-4431 
Jackson, Carl R., Box 38, Evarts, 1674 

Jenkins, James D., Route 1, Bowling Green, 2-0097, 2-5954 
Jewell, Bobby Owen, 632 Elm St., Clinton, OL 3-6195 
Johnson, Bob, Box 274, Kenvir, Evarts 1454, Evarts 462 
Keeton, C. E. "Buck", Route 3, Franklin, JU 6-4263 
Kimmel. Jerry, Beechmont, GR 6-2656, GR 6-2276 
Kleinschmidt, Richard, 3830 Burwood, Norwood 12, Ohio, 

EL 1-5574, EL 1-5574 
Knotts, Franklin D., L Troop, 6th A/C, Fort Knox, WI 2-2121, 

4-6432 
Lamb, Paul, 427 Carlisle Ave., Lexington, 5-4126, 3-3335 
Lewis, Charles H., Willisburg, 375-2766 
LeQuire, Harold M., Box 508, Harlan, 1123-J, 2600 
Lindon, David, Insko 

Little, James Glen, Lookout, SK 4-8377 
Lunn, Riley H., 105 North Hall, College Heights, Bowling 

Green, VI 3-9205 
McBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive, Lexington, 

6-7786, 3-3335, Station 1 
McFall, Gene G., Nancy, 678-4826 
McGlothlin, Leonard, 1716 McConnell Ave., Owensboro, MU 

3-3179 
Maggard, Kenneth. Neon, 4881 

Mahanes, Tom, Route 7, Lexington, 6-3446, Georgetown 9105 
Manning, Conley Lee, P. O. Box 72, Whitley City, DR 6-2373 
Martin, Robert E., 608 First St., Henderson, VA 6-4048 
Markert. Thomas. Jr.. 2412 Jolissaint Ave., New Albany, Ind. 

WH 4-8220, WH 4-2668 
Mayes. Edward, 838 Crossbill Rd.. Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Meiman, William A., 1700 Deer Park, Louisville, HI 7131 W, 

JU 7-6897 
Miller, Claude O., 7041/. Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Roy L., Belton, GR 6-2666 
Mitchell, James, 317 Warrendale, Georgetown 
Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center, Erlanger, DI 1-5628 
Mullins, Bobby E.. Box 470, Paintsville, 789-4610, 789-4550 
Musselman, Thomas, Cherokee Station, P. O. Box 5165, 

Louisville, GL 1-5130, GL 8-1586 
Myers, Charles N., 3932 Frankfort Avenue, Louisville, GL 8-3003, 

TW 5-1357 
Noel. Paul W., Midway, TH 6-4101 

Osborne, Kenneth, Box 261, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Overton, Frank, Jr., P. O. Box 36, Four Mile, ED 7-2026 
Palumbo, Arthur O., Annville, EM 4-2045, EM 4-2048 
Parrott, Lanny, 202 Bibb St., Campbellsville, 173 W, 579 
Penrod. Joe B., 1203 Locust, Owensboro, MU 3-8773, MU 4-1175 
Phelps, Bay, Box 533, Russell, Grand 172 
Piper, James K., 597 Rosemill Drive, Lexington 
Polston, Billy D., Church St., Burkesville, 6703 
Polly, Rex, P. O. Box 483, Whitesburg 

Prewitt. Allan, 210 Campbell, Lancaster, 774, Bryantsville 2631 
Price, Charles, Meally, 789-3907, Ashland, EA 4-3177 
Pursifull, Cleophus, 808 Dorchester Ave., Middlesboro, 2208 

7-2329 
Rainey, Jimmy, 16 Phillips Street, Winchester, PL 4-2948, 

PL 4-2818 
Rapier, Burl, 7201 Briscoe Lane, Louisville 18, CE 9-8561 
RauBch, Edward H., 3511 Tyrone Dr., Louisville 18, GL 4-6054 
Reinhardt, Myron S.. 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, 

HI 1-3730, MY 7-9731 
Rice, William, Jr., P. O. Box 214, Hickman 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2691, Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, Morgan E., 1702 Larkmoor, Louisville 18, GL 8-6240, 

GL 8-6240 
Ring, William H., 107 Watson Court, Frankfort, CA 7-4096 
Robinson. George W., 215 Arlington Ave., Lexington, 2-1882 
Sang, Robert, 4312 Gartin Ave., Ashland 
Scale, John D., Box 34, Booneville. LY 3-2792, LY 3-2545 
Schaffer, Gary R., 1505 Oleanda Ave., Apt. 4, Louisville, 

WA 1-9230 (Bus.) 
Sheffer, Larry, 801 N. Morgan, Morganfield, 851 
Shilney, Stephen J., 6006 Middlerose Circle, Valley Station 
Singleton, Vesper, Carr Creek, MI 2-3316, 2-3833 
Small, Bill, 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville 16, EM 8-8366, 

GL 1-1882 
Small, Rex, 300 E. 27th St., Owensboro, MU 4-2845, MU 3-2431 
Smith, D. W., 8107 Rory Way, Louuisville 19, WO 9-0061, 

JU 7-6716 
Smith, Donald J., Gray Hawk, 7-2160 

Smith, Wayne N., Cane Valley, Fulton 4-6943, Fulton 4-4341 
Smith, Willard N., Cane Valley, Fulton 4-5943, Campbellsville 

312 
Spencer, Pittman R., Liberty, Science Hill 
Spurlock, Ralph, Cawood, 1187-M 
Stacy, Richie M., West Liberty, SH 3-4742 
Stanfield, Carl, 403 Clark St., Maysville 
Stephens, Kenneth H., Stearns, DR 6-2166, DR 6-6371 
Stephens, Robert, Box 629, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Summers, James F,, Box 693, Jenkins, 549, 243 
Sumner, Harold Carl, 1865 Heaton Road, Louisville, EM 8-3647, 

WH 4-8586 
Swope, William W., 438 Price Road, Lexington, 6-2468, 2-2220 
Tarter, Edward E., 1003 Mayer Ave., Louisville, ME 6-2403 
Tinsley, Earl L., 611 Donivan, Princeton, EM 6-6606 
Tipton, Asa I., 828 Hillwood, Frankfort, CA 3-8714, CA 3-1641 
Todd, James L.. 301 Main, Earlington, DU 3-5320, DU 3-4421 
ToUe, Charles W., 207 S. Elmarch, Cynthiana, 1960, 152 
Tolle, Lewis D., 225 Church St., Cynthiana, 1436, 236 
Toy. Eddie N., 436 Vista Ct., Mt. Sterling. 186, 7 



Turner, Aaron P., 2805 Florence, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4811, 

AM 9-2102 
Turner, Bruce, 1456 High Street, Paris, 534, 9030 
Turner, Jack, 559 East 4th St., Newport, JU 1-2857 
Tyre, Donald C, 802 Kentucky Ave., Frankfort, CA 3-0518, 

CA 7-9575, Ext. 250 
Vallandingham, Dale, 1807 Holman, Covington. AX 1-B188, 

KI 1-6600, Ext. 491 
Vance, Earl G., 826 W. Main, Glasgow, OL 1-3083, OL 1-5205 
Vannerson, Duke, Route 2, Paducah, 442-3600, 444-9439 
Van Winkle, Billy R., 2600 E. Cloverdale Dr., Owensboro, 

MU 3-4617, Foust Jr. High School 
VanZant, Jim, East 2nd Street, Williamson, W. Va. 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 

Walls, Harry B., 1310 Walter Ave., Louisville, EM 6-3454 
Walkup, Buss, P. O. Box 313, Neon 
Way, James, 211 Penn, Cynthiana, 1300, 586 
Webb, James G., 1480 Central Avenue, Barbourville 
White, J. L., 1928 Gary Ave., Bowling Green, 2-2463, 3-9249 
Wilcher, Grover C, Hustonville, FI 6-3142, Danville 929 
Wilkerson, Bennie Joe, Lowes, OR 4-5173 
Willey, Harold L., 2214 Inwood Drive, Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams, Paul W., Room 12, Men's Hall, Morehead State 

College, Morehead 
Williams, Tom M., Jr., 116 E. Broadway, Bardstown, FI 8-3079, 

Fern Creek CE 9-3267 
Willis, Robert A., 234 South 25th St., Louisville 12, SP 8-6526, 

JU 5-2251, Ext. 282 
Wilson, Jack R., 617 West Main, Morehead, ST 4-5624, ST 4-4443 
Wilson, S. O., Jr., Meadow Lane, Murray, PL 3-5625 
Wolford. Hoover, Phelps 

Woods. Gene, Route 2, Kirksey, HU 9-2695 
Yanoff, Jay 3702 Stanton Louisville, GL 8-7574 
Zachem, Vincent, 115 West Wind Trail, Bardstown, FI 8-8985, 

FI 8-8147 
Change in address or phone number : Monahan, Ed, 6821 
Tarawa Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, JA 1-6682 



What Is An Official 

Between the exuberance of the winner and 
the downhearted dismay of the loser we find 
a creature called an official. Officials come 
in assorted sizes and sihapes but usually are 
dressed in the same type of uniform. All, 
however, have the same creed — to watch ev- 
ery play of every quarter of every game and 
to call the plays to the best of their ability 
as they see them. 

Officials are found everywhere — on the 
field, in the gym, on the track, on the mat, on 
the diamond, in the pool — on top of, running 
around, jumping over, climbing through, and 
always with whistle ready, looking, looking, 
looking for some infraction. Fellow officials 
rib them, athletes tolerate them, spectators 
boo them, coaches criticize them., wives adore 
them, sons and daughters idolize them and 
mothers worry about them. An official is 
Courage in cleats, Spirit in stripes. Wisdom 
with a whistle and, despite the fact that they 
get paid for their work, they have a devotion 
to duty above and beyond that one normally 
finds in a day's work. 

When the game is close, the officials ai"e 
incompetent, indecisive, and stupid. When 
it is one-sided, they are merciless, whistle- 
happy, careless and domineerin.g. 

An official is a composite. He looks like a 
gentleman acts like a traffic cop, is as fussy 
as an old grandmother with her sewing bas- 
ket, as immaculate as a debutante and as big 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



a ham actor as Elvis Presley playing Hamlet 
in Madison Square Garden. 

To himself, an official has never missed a 
play, called a ball a strike or split a second 
incorrectly with a stop watch. He has the 
eyes of an eagle, the keen mind of an Ein- 
stein, the judgment of Solomon and the speed 
and graceful motion of Joe DiMaggio and 
Jesse Owens, all rolled into one. 

To the men who work with him. he is al- 
ways out of position, runs like a truck, steals 
calls from under his partner's nose, is blind 
as a bat, stupid as a mule, and is utterly in- 
capable of making a correct decision on any- 
thing except who should drive. 

An official likes trips out of town (with 
mileage), few training sessions, well-coached 
teams, considerate coaches, polite players, 
dn.- fields, cool crisp days, and the quiet sat- 
isfaction of haxang been a part of a perfect 
football day. He cares not for wet games, 
tough decisions, screaming coaches and irate 
fans. 

An official is a wonderful creature. You 
can criticize him but you can't intimidate 
him. You can question his judgment but not 
his honesty. He is the symbol of fair play, 
integrity and sportsmanship. He is a hard- 
working, alert, determined individual who is 
making a great contribution to the American 
way of life through athletics. 

—Peter Billick 

Rochester, New York 



Importance of 
Game Officials 

With the advent of another basketball sea- 
son, the matter of satisfactory officiating is 
certain to be a recurrent subject; especially 
in elimination tournament games. 

In fact, not unlike satisfactory rules 
changes, good officiating presents a peren- 
nial problem. This may be due to the fact 
that it is admittedly the most difficult to of- 
ficiate of all sports, sponsored by our Associ- 
ation. 

Within the last year, a nationally known 
college basketball coach, in the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association Bulletin, wrote: 

"Victory or Defeat is determined in more 
than half of the games by the officials." 

This is a startling indictment of Vjasketball 
officiating, and basketball officials in gen- 
eral. Suffice to say, we are not in full accord 
with the pronouncement. Even if the state- 



ment were true in much less than half of the 
basketball games, the conclusion is inescapa- 
ble that officiating leaves much to be desired, 
places too great a burden on the officials, and 
thereby discounts playing accomplishments 
of the contending teams. 

Good officiating, like good teaching, is dif- 
ficult if not impossible to define. Likewise 
the attributes of an outstanding official are 
as subtle as those of the master teacher. 

Good officiating demands, among other 
things, knowledge of the rules, physical con- 
dition, emotional stability, floor personality, 
quick reaction time, accurate thinking, famil- 
iarity with the psychological aspects of be- 
haviorism, impelling honesty, a sense of 
judgment, rhythm of floor movement, a cer- 
tain degree of diplomacy, an abundance of 
courage. All these attriljutes must be forti- 
fied by proper game mechanics, good offici- 
ating techniques a n d a determination t o 
"stay in there" when the going gets rugged. 

Being subject to human frailty, an official 
need not be dishonest to be unsatisfactoiy. 
He can be inefficient even without mental 
predilection, prejudice, or ulterior motives. 

Since an official's judgment must neces- 
sarily be based on observation, and his re- 
sultant decisions on proper rules-understand- 
ing, then it is axiomatic that every basket- 
ball oficial must of necessity understand the 
rules, not only as written, but as they apply 
to game operation. The oft heard remark, 
"Oh, anyone can learn the rules." is an old 
bromide that is just not exactly in accord 
with fact. Experience has indicated that 
while "anyone can learn the rules," unfortun- 
ately .some do not succeed in doing so. 

To be, where an official oug'ht to be, at the 
time he ought to be there, is of next import- 
ance. In this respect, probably one of the 
most important factors in modern basketball 
officiating, in maintaining adequate cover- 
age, is through a system of "switching." 
Ability to switch is the keynote to good 
teamwork on the part of both officials. It 
involves the ability to suddenly transfer 
from the "Out" official to the "In" official 
or vice versa, as the exigency of the situation 
demands. 

Intelligent, honest, and persistent effort 
on the part of all registered officials, and 
consistent cooperation on the part of coaches 
and sponsors of the games will do much to 
produce a better officiated game, and more 
universal satisfaction to all concerned. 

—THE PA'THLETE 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

The first requests for a basketball ruling 
have come from Colonel Bob Hinshaw, As- 
sistant Commissioner of the Indiana High 
School Athletic Association, and Coach Buck 
Sydnor of Daviess County High. They both 
ask about this traveling situation. 

They say they know that if a moving play- 
er receives the ball and stops by alighting on 
one foot and jumps off that foot to hit the 
the floor simultaneously with both feet that 
he may not pivot and that if he dribbles the 
ball must leave his hand before either foot 
leaves the floor. What both gentlemen ask 
is: May this player now raise a foot or jump 
to pass or shoot provided the ball leaves his 
hand before the raised foot touches the floor 
or if he jumps before either foot touches the 
floor? The answer is "YES." 

Before the 1961 State Tournament Champ- 
ion is crowned, roughly a hundred more re- 
quests for rulings will come in from the fif- 
teen areas surrounding the locations of this 
year's clinics. Here are some "short shots'* 
about this year's 1900 mile, nineteenth con- 
secutive clinic tour of The Flying Dutchman. 

On Saturday, October 1, the day before 
the clinic journey started, the Knights Boos- 
ters' Club of Elizabethtown Catholic High 
School honored The Flying Dutchman with a 
testimonial dinner in Louisville. You can 
count on nice "guys" like Dave Wilmoth, Jim 
Hartlege and Hardin McLane to dream up 
such a fabulous occasion which the Dutch- 
man will always remember, hoping some day 
to be able to merit the compliments paid him. 

Pulling up in Newport the next day for our 
first session, we saw faithful, reliable Stan- 
ley Arnzen sitting on the front steps of the 
school, waiting to welcome personally every 
coach and official. This he does annually, 
always opening up the doors a couple of hours 
before the scheduled starting time. "Hand- 
some Stan," one of the most likeable chaps 
in Northern Kentucky, is getting the Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor award for October. His 
work at the Newport clinics is enough to 
qualify him. Then, add to this the clinic 
party he staged for the fellows, plus his nat- 
ural desire to help people just because he 
likes them, and you have a most admirable 
Cob Pipe winner. Mayor Ralph Mussman of 
Newport remarked, "It could -not happen to 
a nicer guy." 

In case you are interested in food, listen 
to this: Dr. Adron Doran, Morehead's Presi- 




Stan Arnzen 

dent, joined Bob Laughlin, the Dutchman 
and Ray Rice Hornback for a country ham 
lunch at the Eagle's Nest; Coach Bill Clark, 
his athletic staff and Basil Jones had steaks 
"two inches" thick waiting at Somerset, and 
Howard Gardner made it more steaks at 
Elizabethtown. Joe Billy Mansfield and the 
Dutch boy had already dined before Presi- 
dent Kelly Thompson of Western got hold of 
us at Bowling Green, but President Kelly 
stayed with us through the entire clinic. 

At Louisville, John Dromo brought his 
entire coaching class from the University of 
Louisville to the clinic, and at Mayfield Rex 
Alexander showed up with his class in offi- 
ciating from Murray State College. We had 
coaches and officials from Indiana, Ohio, 
West Virginia, Illinois and Tennessee in at- 
tendance besides more than 2,000 Kentuck- 
ians. 

In Lexington the Dutchman's "cup ran 
over." Here, Julian Walker, Superntendent 
of Recreation, had a citation to present on 
behalf of the Fayette County Recreation 
Board. It began to look like the E'town 
Knights Boosters' Club had set off a chain 
reaction. 

The Assistant Commissioner did all of our 
driving in Western Kentucky, and had us lost 
more than half the time. He had this philoso- 
phy of driving: Drivers who are contented 
— don't get their cars so quickly dented. Joe 
Billy spent a half day looking for Carlos 
Oakley in Morganfield but all he could find 
was Maggie. Carlos was in New York at the 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



World Series. 

Down Paducah way the folks are cheering 
Joe Mitchell, promotions director of the Sun- 
Democrat. Joe has been named Mr. Recrea- 
tion of Kentucky for 1960. This is the high- 
est honor which can come to a non-profess- 
ional in the field of recreation. Joe "Mr. 
Tireless" Mitchell has seen ten years of 
effort finally result in the creation of a 
Paducah Recreation Board. Presently this 
Board is getting ready to hire a recreation 
director for the city. Irvin S. Cobb and Alben 
Barkley would have been proud of Joe. 

Here is our last "short shot" about the 
basketball clinics. It isn't unusual to see a 
dozen fellows like "Young Sid" Meade, South 
Portsmouth, Bill Gannon of London, Bob 
Daniel of Muhlenberg Central, or Jude Talbot 
of Sacramento at two clinics in one day, but 
several records were set this year when a 
number of fellows attended three clinics. The 
Dutchman would like the names of these 
three-timers. Send them in. 

Bill Endicott of the Courier-Journal has 
distinguished himself by making the first 
Game Guy recommendation for the new 
athletic year. Bill Davis' a guard on Har- 
rodburg High football team, is the chap 
honored. Bill Davis has been crippled since 
birth, but Coach Charlie Kolasa says his 
desire and courage over-came all his mis- 
fortune. 

Ben Flora, a Kentucky gentleman and a 
scholar, is now Superintendent at Irvine. 
From Ben comes the recommendation that 
M.M.I, should have an Abou Ben Adhem 
citation because of the outstanding sports- 
manship of Colonel Blankenship, Captain 
Rees and Coach Betts. If Ben says Millers- 
burg deserves it — Millersburg does. The 
award is on its way. The Dutchman remem- 
bers Ben telling him one time that, "No man 
finds life worth living, he makes it that 
way !" That Ben Flora is "The Greatest." 

The "youthful" Briscoe Inman announces 
the following Schools for Basketball Offic- 
ials for the Twelfth Region: 8:00 P.M., Som- 
erset Auditorium, Monday, November 7, 
1960; 8:00 P.M., Central College Gym, 
Thursday, November, 10, 1960; 7:00 P.M., 
London Gym, Monday, November 14, 1960. 
In these clinics he hopes to cover all quest- 
ions on the 1960-61 rule changes, blocking 
and charging, floor techniques, and any 
questions on old rules. 

Think this over, Otis — Psychiatrists say 
that it's not good for a man to keep too much 
to himself, and the Department of Revenue 
says the .same thing. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky Department of Extension. 
The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photography, 
and action shots are combined in this new film pre- 
pared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp es- 
pecially for coaching use. Among the drills and plays 
covered in this film are: pivot man's slide into the 
basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket Maker; 
legal screening; penetrating zone defense; and the 
Kentucky fast break. 

BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sanction of the 
National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can and 
do arise is the continuity thread used throughout the 
film to depict: Accepted officiating procedures — prob- 
lems created by double fouls and false double fouls — 
tricky situations connected with front and back court 
■ — jump ball infractions and procedures — little under- 
stood distinction between player and team control — 
and a panorama of basic rule fundamentals. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow-motion photography is used to 
break the various court techniques down into, easily 
grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 

I reel, $1.50 
Basic movement skills (running, starting, stopping, 
turning) passing (finger control, movement with the 
pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right pass), 
catching (side pass, high pass), shooting (finger con- 
trol, arm extension, wrist flip, choice of the right shot), 
dribbling, making, and pivoting are demonstrated and 
explained in this film. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



Page Nine 



BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, ?.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations. It demon- 
strates current rules and good officiating procedure, 
with colorful action by skilled players. 

CARR CREEK VS. HENDERSON (1956) K.H.S. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 

c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
The final game of the 1956 State Basketball Tom-na- 
ment is shown in this film. Carr Creek High School 
defeated Henderson by a narrow margin, 72 to 68, to 
win the championship. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the m.eans best 
used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 
1 reel, $1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illustrated, 
using special photography to demonstrate points. Re- 
bounding, pivoting, and coirelated arm action are 
taught also. 

EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1957) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a 
3 reels, color, $.75 
The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Tourna- 
ment was played in Freedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fair Grounds and Exposition Center before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 
Lafayette Generals won the crown for the fourth time. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

This is an excellent film of the game in which 

Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-66 

for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 

of the attack by the champions while all-state players, 

Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best for Adair 

County. The presentation of all awards and trophies 

for the tournament is shown also. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 1956 STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, sound, $.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tournament 
are shov^fn in this film. Action shots of the crowd, 
cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addition to a 
part of the play in each tournament game. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are inter- 
preted in this film. In addition, play situations are 
demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mission 
basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State High 
School Tournament. Particular skills are shown by 
Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who averaged thirty 
points a game for Hughes High School, Cincinnati; 
Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot % inch giant from the Port- 
land, Oregon, State High School champions; and 
Chuck Darling, Ail-American center from the Univer- 
sity of Iowa. 

MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (19S0 K.H.S.A.A 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, silent, $.75 

Flaget High School of Louisville defeated Monticello 

High School in the final game of the touraament to 

win the championship. The Braves came from behind 

in the last half to overtake the Trojans and win by a 

score of 65-56. 



NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL 

(1959) K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS, e-j-s-ca, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The Indians of North Marshall High School proved 

too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the final 

game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State players, 

Doyle and Lampley, were best for the winners, while 

Melear and Siers led the Reds. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such a 
clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn each 
play. 

RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMP- 
IONSHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the high lights of all the games, 
both regular season and tournament games, which 
led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA 
basketball crown. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total body 
coordination, especially inward rotation of the hand 
and arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K. H. S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament bv defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 



Here And There 

Many areas are enjoying a revival of 
competitive interscholastic gymnastics. The 

interscholastic gymnastic program sponsor- 
ed by the MINNESOTA High School League 
this year again attracted much favorable 
attention. In response to requests from 
throughout the state, gymnnastic demon- 
strations were used between halves of the 
championship series games during the Min- 
nessota State Tournament. Boys who had 
placed in the top six places in the State 
Gymnastic Meet were given an opportunity 
to demonstrate their events. There were ex- 
ercises on the mats, parallel bars, horizontal 
bars, trampoline, and a tumbling act. The 
tumbling act was not included in the state 
gymnastic Events but was worked out by 
the state championship gymnastic team and 
was most interesting to watch. Activities on 
the horse and still rings were not used be- 
cause activities on the horse are limited and 
the arrangement of the rings in the Univers- 
ity of Minnesota Field House is such that it 
could be rather dangerous for a high school 
boy. Both Field House spectators and tele- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



MEDICAL ASPECTS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
at all four conferences. 

Coaches, trainers and team physicians 
were invited to attend the conferences. The 
programs were not overladen with speeches, 
thus giving many opportunities for specific 
problems in the question and answer period. 

Besides the value of the conference itself, 
a greater value is beginning to accrue. Many 
sections are planning conferences of their 
own with local medical men aiding in the pro- 
gram. This develops a closer relationship 
between doctor and coach and could result in 
a better approach to the athletic i n j u r y 
problem. 

Athletic Injury Insurance 

No matter how wisely you purchase equip- 
ment, how well conditioned your athletes 
are, an ideal coaching situation and athletic 
injury conferences held twice weekly, boys 
are still going to be injured, especially in con- 
tact sports. What then? 

Athletic injury insurance for most schools 
is almost a necessity. The rising cost of this 
type insurance can be attributed to a number 
of causes, but certainly not due to profiteer- 
ing by the insurance companies. Not to in- 
sure may place a burden on the athletic funds 
or upon the family of the injured that would 
be unjust and could be quite calamitous. To 
insure, requires the study of a number of 
plans that will give you the type of program 
you feel will best fit your school or locality. 
Athletic insurance, in many instances, is be- 
ing tied in with pupil protection plans that 
spread the risk over the entire .student body. 
Generally, the cost of the athletic injury pro- 
gram is also spread with an increased prem- 
ium per student as the result. 

In conclusion, may I state that more ef- 
forts are being made today to eliminate or 
minimize athletic injuries than ever before 
but a relaxation of attitude cannot be toler- 
ated for the sake of our athletic program. 



WHAT DIRECTION 

(Continued from Page One) 
after due deliberation. To me, this is a real 
achievement. I commend the organization 
and its leadership for the real progress that 
has been made by the N.H.I.A.A. for a period 
of more than a decade. 

I believe that practically all of us agree 
that self-discipline is the goal of all disci- 
pline. I like to think that this organization 
is the instrument by which inter.scholastic 
athletic programs, statewide, have disci- 



plined themselves for the good of all con- 
cerned. To me, such a process is far superior 
to discipline administered in any other way. 

Organizations such as this one are at times 
under severe pressures to change existing 
patterns in order to popularize certain facets 
of its operation. I am well aware of those 
pressures. 

You and I know that pitfalls are plentiful, 
and yet, if you and your leadership continue 
to keep the good of children ever foremost in 
your minds, I have no fears for the future. 

In reading through the material published 
by the N.H.I.A.A., I was pleased to see 
spelled out the principle that the program of 
the organization is pledged to the concept 
that its activities are o f , b y and for the 
schools. Further, I enjoyed the references 
made to the fact that this organization sub- 
scribes to the pattern that, in our high 
schools, physical education should be for all 
children and that such a program should pro- 
vide an opportunity for team activities with- 
in their own schools and with interscholastic 
athletic programs open to those most capable 
to profit by and enjoy such activities. The 
sponsorship of such a physical fitness pro- 
gram is a real asset to all concerned. 

But where do we go from here ? 

What direction should interscholastic 
athletics be pointing toward ? What does the 
future hold ? To be sure, none of us are pro- 
phets, and yet the goals we establish and our 
day by day actions do lead somewhere, us- 
ually by design. 

What design should this organization be 
unfolding ? 

May I be bold enough to suggest a few 
component parts of w'hat I believe would be 
useful elements? They are not unusual, nor 
dramatic, but I do believe they have sub- 
stance. 

1. Ever keep the good of the individual 
student in mind. 

This is a simple generalization to make. 
However, its implementation tries the souls 
of men. This concept is based on the princi- 
ple of physical education for all first and ath- 
letics second. As we all know, there is a big 
difference between the two. 

Keeping the individual student in mind 
has some definite specifics associated with 
it, too, as we all well know. Such factors as 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



Page Eleven 



vision viewers expressed a keen appreciation 
of the interscholastic gymnastic program. 

A psychiatrist gave Officials attending a 
Spring athletic injury conference sponsored 
by the MICHIGAN High School Athletic 
Association, four major danger signals that 
might be in evidence when athletes are 
"accident prone." Dr. ROBERT A. MOORE 
said that the situation is "loaded" when: (1) 
athletic ability is grossly out of proportion 
with the individual's willingness to be ag- 
gressive; (2) a boy's aggressiveness or abil- 
ity is out of line with that of his father; (3) 
an athlete is overly aggressive and lacks suf- 
ficient control of himself; and (4) a boy is 
overly timid. "A boy who wants so badly 
to play but hasn't much ability or a boy who, 
with loads of ability, doesn't want to play 
very badly are both candidates for acci- 
dents," said Dr. Moore, a psychiatry instruc- 
tor at the Michigan Medical Center. Dr. 
Moore went on to say that "An athletic 
father who pushes his not-too capable son 
into sports creates a hazard. It is just as 
dangerous when a boy's ability is much 
greater than his father's. This puts him in 
the potential frightening situation of defeat- 
ing his father. The too-aggressive player 
may rush blindly into the foray so he and 
his opponents are stretched out on the turf. 
The overly-timid may halt before being 
tackled and is likely to suffer greater injury 
on contact." 

An ever-increasing number of boys are 
privileged to participate in interscholastic 
programs sponsored by the several State 
High School Athletic Associations. This is 
possible because the State Associations are 
always extending their efforts toward the 
objective of "A SPORT FOR EVERY BOY 
AND EVERY BOY IN A SPORT." Reports 
indicate that this is accomplished by increas- 
ing the number of teams representing a 
school in a given activity and also by adding 
new activities to the program whenever 
possible. Early reports indicate that this 
year many schools are sponsoring cross 
country for the first time. Last year over 
50,000 boys rom approximately 3,000 schools 
competed interscholastically in cross country. 
This year the number should be considerably 
greater and, as a result, State Associations 
must revise their state meet programs to 
accommodate the increase. For example, this 
fall, for the first time, sectional meets will 
be sponsored by the Wisconsin Interscholas- 
tic Athletic Association, through which boys 
will earn the privilege of participating in the 



state meet. 

In PUERTO RICO, there are very few, if 
any, basketball courts indoors and so conse- 
quently the game is played out-of-doors. 
Recently an inquiry from the University of 
Puerto Rico asked the Basketball Rules Com- 
mittee when a rained-out game was legal, 
and from what point games stopped because 
of rain or inclement weather are resumed. 
The ruling provided that because of the un- 
usual circumstances, Puerto Rican leagues 
or conferences should make provisions for 
weather situations. It was suggested that 
"because the outcome of basketball games 
is so unpredictable, regardless of the score at 
a particular moment, in all cases where the 
game is called off after it has started, no 
game be declared and the game be replayed." 
Puerto Rico is progressing very rapidly in 
basketball and the rules of the National 
Basketball Committee are widely used. It 
will be recalled that Puerto Rico had a team 
in the Olympics at Rome this summer. 

The Athletic Journal reports that CLEVE- 
LAND HEIGHTS and UNIVERSITY 
SCHOOL played a speeded-up Baseball game 
last spring at the conclusion of the Baseball 
season. The elapsed time for the 6i/o-inning 
game was one hour and 21 minutes. The 
pitchers were allowed five warm-up throws 
from the mound before the game but they 
were permitted to take none between innings. 
Game statistics show that the first pitch in 
each inning was a ball in five instances, in 
six it was a strike, and two strikes were hit. 
All the groups sponsoring Baseball are work- 
ing to speed up the game and the Ohio ex- 
periment is just one indication of what can 
be accomplished with concentrated effort. 

The AMERICAN DENTAL SOCIETY has 
recently authorized and circularized a state- 
ment urging football players to wear ade- 
quate tooth protection during play and prac- 
tice. The Society's fine comprehensive state- 
ment is being supplied to all local dental 
associations and it gives a professional an- 
alysis of the various kinds and types of 
protection. One section describes in detail 
how custom-made protectors can be made by 
dentists for an economical fee. It is also 
planned to submit a resolution to the Ameri- 
can Dental Society at its annual meeting en- 
couraging local associations to work toward 
the end that all high school football players 
wear effective mouth protectors and to moti- 
vate all agencies of the Society to work to- 
ward this end. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1960 



academic achievement, physical condition, 
protective equipment, number of games 
scheduled, games on school nights, proper 
transportation, housing, and chaperoning of 
traveling teams are but a few of the elements 
which collectively touch intimately each stu- 
dent involved in interscholastic athletics. 
Such significant details must not be lost 
sight of in the heat of battle. They are the 
real warp and woof which eventually cause a 
good interscholastic athletic program to 
either prosper or perish. 

2. Keep school athletics in their proper 
perspective. School athletics should c o n - 
tinue to be subordinate to the academic and 
administrative interests of our schools. We 
must always remember that we are educa- 
tors first and coaches second. This concept 
can be lost sight of easily among the many 
tensions which arise in the course of a year. 
I am well aware of the popular clamor for 
winning teams. However, this organization 
and we, as educators, must continue to be 
dedicated to the principle that athletics are 
but one facet of a total school program and 
should be so designed as to continually be in 
balance with the total program of a school. 
We must never, in our enthusiasm, permit 
our athletic program to grow in size to the 
point where it becomes the tail which wags 
the dog. 

3. Continue to strive toward a balanced 
athletic program in our schools. I am pleased 
to observe the interests of the N.H.I.A.A. al- 
ready encompass ten or more areas of com- 
petitive sports all the way from basketball, 
football, track and baseball to skiing, golf, 
soccer, tennis and hockey. To arrive at a 
balance is not an easy task. We know well 
the appeal of basketball and football, espec- 
ially. We are conscious of the ease with 
which these two sports can be overempha- 
sized. We realize full well the financial load 
which is now carried, especially by basket- 
ball and, to a les.ser degree, by football. We 
know that in most instances these two areas 
carry the financial burden for other inter- 
.scholastic competitive sports. Such a situa- 
tion is a fact of life but not a desirable one 
just the same. Such a pressure usually 
leads to overemphasis of a sport and an ex- 
ploitation of .students. 

I would express the hope that as the years 
ahead unfold other areas of competitive 
sports might be added to the roster which 
now exists. The prime one which comes to 
mind is that of swimming. I realize the obsta- 
cles involved and they are great. Neverthe- 



less, the progress is made only by the dreams 
and aspirations of men coming to fruition. 
For the next few years we may have to con- 
tinue to dream and aspire but, at the same 
time, continue to plan and recommend so that 
a breakthrough can become possible. To me, 
the fact that not a single swimming pool ex- 
ists in a public high school in our state is dis- 
turbing. Certainly, our experiences in World 
War I and World War II dramatized the need 
for all adults to learn how to swim, similar 
to the situation which we observe in our pop- 
lation today, where practically all adults 
know how to drive a motor vehicle. 

4. Evaluate your program. Take time 
out to see where you are going and why. As 
we all know, this is a continuous process. 
However, there are times when we should 
take a long, careful look at our program both 
from its conceptual design point of view and 
from its details of operation. The price of 
progress is usually change. 

It seems to me that a good program of 
evaluation is always a useful instrument in 
plotting future plans. This process causes 
us to observe and evaluate our successes and 
our failures in light of our goals. Such ac- 
tions usually involve changes for the good of 
the whole. It is through this process of in- 
trospection that the details of our program 
become observed and weighted. Here it is 
that we discover whether one area of our en- 
terprise is growing too rapidly While another 
segment is withering on the vine. It is in 
this process of evaluation where we take an- 
other look at our rules of the game to make 
sure that our high goals are actually being 
practiced. This, I know, you have done in 
the past. It is surely worthy of continuation 
into the future. 

In closing, I would like to congratulate the 
leaders and members of the N.H.I.A.A. for 
its program. I am impressed with the pur- 
poses of the organization. I commend its 
cosmopolitan approach to an intimate part 
of the American educational scene. It is a 
pleasure for me to see public and independent 
school people working together to do better 
a task which is to be done. This kind of co- 
operation is truly Americana at its best. 

My own interest in this segment of the ed- 
ucational enterprise in New Hampshire is 
keen. You can be assured of my continued 
help and support. 

Finally, may I thank you for the opportun- 
ity you have afforded me to present to you 
some of my ideas and concerns. I appreciate 
it sincerely. Thank you. 



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Hiqh School Athkte 



St. Xavier*s State Championship Cross Country Team 





(Left to Rig^ht) Front Row: Blaine Vetter, Will Conlon, Bob Cody, Brian Vctter. 
Second Row : Mgr. Ed Stastny, Capt. Joe Kroh, (Jene Clifford, John Nordman, Mike 
Wigginton, Coach Jerry Denny. 



Offical Oxgan of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN 
DECEMBER 1BBD 



^-r 



f 




L 



LAFAYETTE— REGION II CLASS AA CHAMPION AND STATE FINALIST 






'^•^^r^ 






i\J^* 




'■•^^^^UhQi^^MJ^ 



iii^^ssam^^^-st!t^ 



I Left to Kighti Front Row: Head Coach Walton. Lagrew, Werner. Christian. Bozarth, Robertson. Monroe. Cum. 
mings. Payne, McAlister, Beck. Tucker. Ledford. Fishback. Magruder. Cooper. Mackto, Manager Wilford. Second Row: 
Hale. Simcox. SamTnons. Pully. Jim Ringo. John Ringo. Brand. Hopkins. Draper. Hiles. Vry. Pieratt, 
Bauman. Green. Portnoy. Allen. Mgrs. Tatman and Powell.. Third Row: Backfield Coach Sither. Evans. Sergeant, 
Carr. Hughes. CoUiver. Edwards. Adcock, Powell, Curry, Rouse, Busheli, Prater, Alloway, Bowles, Ishmael, Cannon, 



Train 



Abel. End Coach Williams. 



MURRAY— REGION I CLASS A CHAMPION AND STATE FINALIST 




(Left to Rtrhti Front Row: Oakiey. Bryant. Robertson. Lee. Rose. Humphreys. Matthews, Moss. Drake. Herndon. 
Second Row: Thurmond, Wyatt, Danner. Adams. Williams. Edwards. Miller. Workman. Hale. Wells. Richardson. Third 
Row: Spann. Tabers. Wilson. Farrell. Latimer, Futrell, Steele. Youngerman. Hutson. Fourth Row: Head 
Coach Holland, Asa't Coach Alexander, Ass't Mer. Nix, Farmer, Nail, Mgr. Weatherly, Coach Jeffrey, Coach Russell. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VHL. XXIII— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1960 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions -Installment 1 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify 
any rule They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Why should the Official Scorer be iden- 
tified? 

Ruling: In order to expedite the locating of the 
Official Scorer by the substitutes and the Referee and 
th Umpire, it is recommended that the Scorer wear 
identifying apparel. Any apparel which is distinctive 
and quickly identified may be used. In some areas 
the Scorer wears a striped shirt, in others a red cap. 
Official Scorer should be the only person at the table 
to wear such identifying apparel. The marking of the 
Scorer's location at the table is also recommended to 
assist the substitute and Officials in locating the 
Scorer when substitutes are being called into the game. 
(2-10-Note) 

2. Play: After charging a personal foul to Al, the 
Scorers detect that they do not agree on the total 
number of personal fouls charged to him. 

Ruling: Referee should be notified of the discrep- 
ancy. If the error is found, the correction should be 
made. If the error cannot be found, the Referee 
shall accept the record of the Official book unless he 
has knowledge that permits him to decide otherwise. 
(2-10) 

3. Play: During the 4th quarter the Scorers, in 
comparing records after a goal, find team A's total 
individual score is 42 and the progressive team score 
total is 40. 

Ruling: The Referee should be notified and both 
the individual and progressive totals rechecked. If 
possible, correction of any errors should be made. If 
the error is not resolved, the Referee will accept the 
progressive team total of the official score book. 
(2-10) 

4. Play: Al is charged with a: (a) personal foul; 
or (b) technical foul. 

Ruling: Official shall designate the offender to the 
Scorer, regardless of whether the foul is a personal or 
technical. In both (a) and (b) Al is required to raise 
his hand at arm's length above his head. (2-10) 

5. Play: What are the official ball colors? 
Ruling: The only official ball colors are natural 

tan and the approved orange shade. Balls of all other 
colors are illegal. Manufacturers have been notified 
of the orange shade approved by the Rules Committee. 
The orange-colored ball has met with great favor and 
has been given equal status with the natural-tan ball 
for the coming seson. To avoid the necessity of large 
inventories of balls and disputes about the color of 
the ball to be used for a particular game, only the 
two specified colors are legal. For high school and 
YMCA games, a properly constructed approved ball 
with a composition cover is legal and for other groups, 
it is legal if neither group objects. (1-12) 

6. Flay: Either one or both lane spaces adjacent 
to the end line are not occupied by B players during 
a free throw by Al for a personal foul. 



Ruling: Violation. If attempted free throw is suc- 
cessful, it counts. If it is unsuccessful, Al is given a 
substitute throw with players of B occupying both lane 
spaces adjacent to the end line. (9-1) 

7. Play: Al is awarded bonus free throw to which 
he is not entitled. After Official has handed him the 
ball at the free throw line, Al calls for a time-out. 
When play is to be resumed and after Official has 
again handed Al the ball, Official's attention is called 
to the error. 

Ruling: Period during which the correction may 
be made has elapsed. Al may make the bonus try. 
(10-7 Note) 

8. Play: At free throw line before awarding ball 
to free thrower Al, Official indicates it is a two-throw 
foul. Al misses first try and Official erroneously per- 
mits ball to remain in play. Bl secures the rebound 
and advances ball to his end of the court where he 
throws the ball into his basket, (a) Before; or (b) 
after throw-in following the field goal, Al requests 
the second free throw. 

Ruling: Al is entitled to his second free throw in 
both (a) and (b). Play is resumed from the point at 
which it was interrupted to rectify the error. (10-7 
Note) 

9. Play: After receiving the ball while both feet are 
off the floor, Al alights on his right foot, followed 
by his left foot behind his right foot. 

Ruling: Al may pivot on the first foot to touch 
the floor, that is, in this situation, the right foot. Also 
he may lift either foot but if he lifts his pivot foot 
or jumps before he passes or throws for goal, the 
ball must leave his hands before the pivot foot again 
touches the floor or, if he has jumped, before either 
foot touches the floor. (4-17) 

10. Play: After receiving the ball with only the 
right foot on the floor, Al places the left foot behind 
his right foot. 

Ruling: Al may pivot, using the right foot, but he 
may not pivot using the left foot. Al may dribble but 
the ball must leave his hands before the right foot (in 
this case, the front foot) leaves the floor. (4-17) 

11. Play: Al receives the ball while standing still. 
Ruling: He may pivot, using either foot. He may 

lift either foot but if he lifts his pivot foot or jumps 
before he passes or throws for goal, the ball must 
leave his hands before the pivot foot again touches 
the floor or, if he has jumped before either foot touches 
the floor. In starting a dribble, the ball must leave 
his hands before the pivot foot leaves the floor. (4-17) 

12. Play: During a live ball, Al and Bl foul each 
other simultaneously and, before the ball is put in 
play, A2 commits a technical foul. 

Ruling: Permit any player of team B to shoot 

the free throw for the technical foul and the ball is 

then put in play by a jump ball at the center circle. 

In this particular situation, there actually was a double 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



DECEMBER, 1960 



VOL. XXni— No. 5 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Vice-President W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-62), Louisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63), Green- 
ville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown: Gran C. Teater 
(1960-64), Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom the Commissionei s (Jffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1960 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 1961 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by ir ^ principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools on ballotb returned to the State Office before 
November 15. There were several ties in the voting 
for delegate and alternate. These ties were broken 
recently, with the delegates or alternates involved be- 
ing determined by lot. The names of the district rep- 
resentatives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) James H. Phillips, (2) John Robinson, (3) C. 
W. Jones, (4) Reed Conder, (5) J. W. Withrow, (6) 
Earl Adkins, (7) Paul Perdue, (8) Harold Ross, (9) 
Estel Manasco, (10) Lewis Johnson, (11) Paul Phillips, 
(12) L. L. McGinnis, (13) Jack Williamson, (14) Bill 
Warren, (15) Maurice Martin, (16) James Hill (17) 
James Walker, (18) Harold Hunter, (19) K. B. Sidwell, 
(20) John C. Marrs, (21) Billy B. Smith, (22) Ray 
Hammers, (23) H. L. Perkins, (24) Milton Gra- 
ham, (25) Atwood Wilson, (26) W. S. Milburn, (27) 
W. K. Niman, (28) John Trapp, (29) Samuel Smith, 
(30) Bill Harrell, (31) Robert B. Hehl, (32) Cyrus 
Greene, (33) Duncan Huey, (34) Robert Naber, (35) 
John Hegenauer, (36) Lawrence Kinney, (37) Joe An- 
derson, (38) Dwight Wolfe, (39) Joe Simons, (40) 
Charles Wilson, (41) F. D. Wilkinson, (42) Amos 
Black, (43) John Heber, (44) L. R. Singleton, (45) 
Leslie Dyehouse, (46) Billy Riddle, (47) James Baker, 
(48) Joe Gregory, (49) Jack Powell, (50) Harry Tay- 
lor, (51) P. P. Estridge, (52) Ed Miracle, (53) Roy 
Reasor, (54) Jim Caudill, (55) Millartl Tolliver, (56) 
A. M. Ritchie, (57) W. F. Doane, (5»j JacK F, Wells, 
(59) James Chandler, (60) Leonard Marstiall, (61) 
Arthur Hawkins, (62) Jesse Mayabb, (63) Harold Hol- 
brook, (64) Stanley Ramsey. 



(1) Harold Romaine, (2) Richard Winebarger, (3) 
W. W. Chumbler, (4) Robert Goheen, (5) Robert Met- 
calfe, (6) James Larmouth, (7) R. A. Belt, (8) 0. P. 



Hurt, (9) Wayne WiUson, (10) H'Earl Evans, (11) L. 
D. Knight, (12) George Claiborne, (13) Howard Owens, 
(14) Bob Burres, (15) Charles Combs, (16) Wayne 
Ewing, (17) Arthur Reynolds, (18) James Young, 
(19) Carroll Holmes, (20) W. K. Norris, (21) Sam 
Thomas, (22) Ralph Dorsey, (23) Kenneth Riddle, 
(24) Gamis Martin, (25) E. 0. Adams, (26) H. D. 
Glenn, (27) T. T. Knight. (28) John E. Pace, (29) L. 
W. Mullins, (30) Joe McPherson, (31) Bill Bailey, 
(32) Alonzo Combs, (33) Charles Goodridge, (34) 
Richard Bezold, (35) James Connor, (36) Tom Gab- 
bard, (37) Kelly Stanfield, (38) Louis Cunningham, 
(39) Clay Evans, (40) William B, Reed, (42) Robert 
Turner, (43) Gene Huff, (44) J. B. Moore, (45) Wan-en 
Wainwright, (46) Jack Johnson, (47) D. D. Manning, 
(48) C. Frank Bentley, (49) David Jackson, (50) Bob- 
by Gathers, (51) Chester Click, (52) William Bosch, 
(53) Henry Wright, (54) Homer Jones, (55) George 
Coi-nette, (56) W. 0. Gabbard, (57) W. S. Risner, (58) 
Thomas Boyd, (59) Gail Gillem, (60) Neil Hundley, 
(61) William Elster, (62) Russell Boyd, (63) Roy 
Murphy, (64) Charles Banks. 

State Tournament Information 

The 1961 State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in the Universtiy of Kentucky Coli- 
seum, Lexington, on March 15-18. The first session is 
scheduled for Wednesday night. Three sessions will be 
held on Thursday, two on Friday and two on Saturday. 
At some time in the month of December the Com- 
missioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools foi-ms 
which may be used in requesting passes to the tourna- 
ment. These forms may be returned on and after 
Januaiy 2. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at $10.00 (end 
seats, balcony), $16.00 (chair back seats and bleacher 
seats below the ramps), and $20.00 (box seats). The 
general sale of tickets (not school orders) will be con- 
ducted by State Tournament Ticket Sales, P. 0. Box 
1173, Lexington. These orders should not be placed 
before January 30. The amount of 25c should be added 
to each remittance (not school orders) to pay for post- 
age and insurance charges. Orders mailed prior to 
January 30 will receive a lower priority than those 
mailed on that date. 

New Publications 

The attention of K.H.S.A.A. principals, athletic direc- 
tors, and coaches is called to the following new publi- 
cations, copies of which have been received by the 
state office of the K.H.S.A.A. 

A.A.H.P.E.R. 

Soccer-Speedball Guide, 1960-62; Basketball Guide, 
1960-61; Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide, 1960-62; Bowl- 
ing, Fencing, Golf Guide, 1960-62. These are sports 
guides for girls and women. They may be ordered 
from The Division of Girls and Women's Sports, 1201 
16th Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Basketball Officiating 

Bill Haarlow, supervisor of basketball officials of 
the Western Intercollegiate (Big Ten) Conference, has 
written a new book, BASKETBALL OFFICIATING. 
This complete manual offers good advice on how to 
excel in basketball officiating. It focuses on the essen- 
tials of the official's job, describing step-by-step the 
practices and skills involved. Helpful diagrams show 
how to cover play as it develops, and how to get a 
clear view of the action and determine rule infractions 
accurately. The book, which sells at $2.95, may be 
ordered from the Ronald Press Company, 15 East 26th 
Street, New York 10. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Page Three 



FORT KNOX— REGION II CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Rigrhti F 
Mgr. Smith, Camacho 
Third Row: Robinson 



ant Row: Reynolds. Cronk. HolUday, Brink, Sn" 
Roseborough. Hammerstone, Coyne, McMinn, 
Leche, Conley, Hodges, Jackson, Angell, Mc 



ith, Taylor, Jones, Mohler, Rust. Second Row: 
Watkins, Barnett, Henderson, Hale, Wilvert. 
randa, Mace. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone, 

Adams, Andrew, 128 Lyons Ave., Morehead, ST 4-5310, ST 4-4476 
Allen, Ed L., Transylvania College, Lexington, 4-4260, 4-2431 
Allsmiller, Jon E., 4143 Candor Ave., Louisville, EM 6-2412, 

ME 7-5492 
Ball. Lonnie, 2126 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Ballinger, Richard L., 333 E. St. Catherine, Louisville, JU 4-2756 
Beasley, Bobby, P. O. Box 164, Hazel Green 
Bickers, Homer G., 172 Winding Way, Frankfort, CA 3-0253, 

CA 3-8523 
Binkley, Richard, A,P.S.C., P. 0. Box 723, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Boone, Winton E., 340 15th St., Bowling Green, VI 3-9984. 
Bowlin, Bob ". O. Box 104, Emlyn 
Brer ling '■■ nley L., 203 Lindon Ave., Southgate, HI 1-7522, 

P^ 1--V00 
Brock, John H., Kettle Island, ED 7-3728, ED 7-2329 
Brown, Leonard C. 575 W. Short St., Lexington, 2-2183. 2-2183 
Brunson. Gary Wayne, 340 15th St., Bowling Green, VI 3-9984 
Burkhart, James G.. Wailins, MO 4-3597 
Campbell, John, Jr., Garrett, EL 8-3061, Ei 8-3461 
Canady, Ray B., Box 176, Barbourville, 6-3601 
Carter. Pusey C, 111 White Oak. Leitchfield, iiS9W 
Cassady, Charles W., U27 Kentucky St., Bowling Creen, 3-9538 
Chaney. Rex, 444 E. Main St., Morehead, 4-5993, <l-4181, Ext. 60 
Chappell, Joe, 4163 Westport Rd., Louisville 'i, TW 6-7055, 

SP 6-8371 
Clark, Owen. 106 Kentucky Ave., Gettrgetown, 2'}47, Lexington 

2-8717 
Collins, John J. "Jack", 3169 Clifford, Covington, AX 1-7116, 

HE 1-0462 
Connell, Jerry, Williamsburg, 6265 

Cooksey, Adrian B., 3217 M'chigan Dr., L.iuisville, SP 2-9544 
Corley, William H., Box 28, Simpsonville, PA 2-8858, PA 2-8fl95 
Cornett, Billy J., 784th ACWRON, P. O. Box 7902, Snow Mtn. 

AFS. Fort Knox. 4-4040 (Bus) 
Cornett, John M., P. O. Box 223, Hindman, ST 5-4975 
Crabtree, Charles E., Box 45, Simpsonville, PA 2-5133, PA 

2-5202 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview Dr., Lexington, 7-4843, 5-0160 
Cropper, William C, Route 2, May's Lick, SO 3-26n2 
Deim, Martin F., Route 4, Box 795, Anchorage, CH 5-5969, 

TW 5-0567 
Distler, Marvin, 9036 Sheed Rd., Cincinnati 39, Ohio. JA 1-3110, 



JA 1-3110 
Drake, Neal M., 246 E. 3rd St., Lexington, 2-6406, 2-6406 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett 

Eads, Walter, Route 1, Box 5, Monticello, FI 8-3849, FI 8-3456 
Ellis, Johnny. Prestonsburg. TU 6-2751, TU 6-3080 
Evans, James "Bug Dust", Auxier, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2072 
Farthine. Aaron W., 1100 N. Roosevelt Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 7-1664, HA 5-6211, Ext. 214 
Feix, Darl, Webster Ave., Cynthiana, 179 (Bus.) 
Fox, Stephen Barry, 131 Transcript, Lexington, 2-7081 
Freeman. Nolan W., 1861 Normandy, Lexington, 7-7323, 2-2868 
Frye, Gilbert Lee, D-108 Coopei-stown, Lexington, 4-9634 
Furgerson, William W., College Station, Murray, PL 3-1336, 

PL 3-2310 
Gaither, Jack, Rockport, BR 4-4357 
Goff, Reathel, Veterans Village, College Heights, Bowling 

Green 
Goff, Richard, Steff 
Goodin, Shirley, Four Mile, 7-2031 
Goranflo. Robert Emmett, 705 Wayside, Middletown, CH 5-8711, 

CH 5-4161 
Graham, Jim, 2601 Elm St.. Ashland, EA 4-8169 
Gray. Raymond. Island, HU 6-3294 
Green, Walter. 1916 S. Kenton St., Corbin, 2377, 465 
Grundy, Charles A., Owensboro 
Gumm, Kenneth, Edenderrv Lane, Louisville 19, WO 9-7335, 

GL 4-7511, Ext. 800 
Hale, Don C, Box 127, Berea. 986-4372 
Hamilton, Kenneth, Elamton, SH 3-4611 
Hamilton, Steve A., Box 526, Morehead St. Col., Morehead, 

4-5951 
Hansel, Earl Dean, Crummies, 2847J 
Hardy, Alvin, 714-C Warrendale, Georgetown. 1527 
Harvey, Bennie, 925 Center St., Henderson, VA 6-3758 
Harris,, Jack, Crab Orchard 
Hart, Billy, 206 Plum, Princeton, EM 5-5773 
Hatler. Elton, 28>/. Ashland, Winchester. PI 4-3814 
Hatter, William F., 4211 Lafayette St., Erianger, DI 1-5139 
Hausfeld, Walter. 3080 Crestmoor, Cincinnati, Ohio, MO 1-1253, 

JA 1-0800 
Hill, Martin, P. O. Box 117, Williamsburg. 3171 
Hoh, Jack, 58 Morris Drive, Lookout Heights, ED 1-2910, ED 

1-3^30 ■ 

Huff, Ronald. Route 1, Hawesville. WA 7-6159 
Huter, Jim, 3654 Vermont, Louisville, SP 6-0707, Henryville, 

Ind. 2271 and 3931 
Jackson, Edward. 913 West 7th St., Owensboro, MU 3-0224 ' 
James. Edward, Route 1, Water Valley 
Johnson, James M., 106 West Main,. Frankfort, CA 7-7639, 

CA 7-7822 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Box 26, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4502, Ft. 
Court, Madisonville, TA 1-4166, 



Caiv 



Jones, Paul. Route 4, 

Knox School 
Jones, Robert T.. 327 

TA 1-5066 

Jordan Larrv A., 1917 Clifton. Paris, 1081R, 1429 
Jusitce, Billv, Box 2183, Williamson, W. Va. 
Kersey. Jerry, Pathfork, MO 4-2007 
Kilgore. Roger, Maloneton. FL 2-1545 
Kirkwood. Patrick. 503 W. Broadway, Madisonville, TA 1-T6ii, 

Kurry, Thomas G. 2512 Ida Ave., Norwood 12, Ohio, RE 1-6166, 

Lambert, Irvin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, WO 9-4718, GL 

Lashbrook. Gene. 607 Warwick Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-0831, 

MU 3-2431 
Lawson Rondall. Morehead State College. Morehead 
Lee, Douglas, Alva. MO 4-3587 

Lee William A.. Wallins Creek. MO 4-3621. MO 4-3444 
Lewis Charles Odell. Route 6. Bowling Green, VI 2-1038 
Lewis Clifton, Jr.. East Hall, West Ky. St. College, Bowling 

Green. VI 2-1038 
Litteral. James W., 460 Locust Ave.. Lexington. 3-0354. 3-33iJ6, 

No 1 Station 
Lockard. Leo A., 6806 Homestead Dr., Louisville. EM 8-8795 
Long. Marshall. Route 3, ShelbyviUe. ME 3-3213. ME 3-3181 
Lusby. George. 504 Clinton. Georgeto — "'"' "' "° — "° 
McBride. Donald R., 1663 Str ' "- 



... 678-W. 98 _ 
Lexington. 5-2153 



McClure. William S.. 404 College St., London, VO 4-5669. 

McCord Coleman. 981 Delia Dr., Lexington, 7-5922, 4-0965 
McDonald. W C. "Chuck", 3646 Northdale Dr.. Cincinnati 13, 

Mark-: Edward W., Sports Branch, Special Services, Fort Knox, 

4-1255 
May Bobbv. Willisburg. 375-2795 
■' adows. Marvin. Clayhole 



Miles. 
Miller, 
Miller, 



Owenton 



CA 



M.. 1142 S. 36th St., Louisville. SP 6-2331 

Gary Lee, Olive Hill 

L O Jr.. 2826 Trimble. Paducah. 44-20014. 444-6311 

Richard Keenan. 163 N. Deepwood Dr.. Radcliff, EL 

1-3748. Ft. Knox 4-4444 
Mudd Leon. 10409 Casalanda Dr.. Valley Station, WE 7-5151 
Mullins, Ben H.. 390 High St.. Jenkins. 855. 768 
Murray Thomas. 611 Edgecliff. Covington. HE 1-1929 
Newso'm Marley. 109 Davis-on St.. Pikeville. GE 7-6782 
Niekell. 'Carl Duane, 2009 Broad St., Paducah, ME 2206, ME 

9702 
Page. Frank. Route 2. Mayfield, Main 
Payne, James Lester, Pleasureville, 

484-2202 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, Beechmont . 

Peden. Harlan C, c/o Lacy School. Route 7, HopkinsviUe 
Phelps. Don C. "Dapey", 142 Alta Ave., Danville, 236-2852 

7-5781 
Pogue. Ivan G., Route 1. Lewisburg 
Pyle, Ronnie F.. Box 120, Bremen, 3821 
Rail Eugene. 105 Reservoir Rd., Frankfort, CA 7-2355, 

7-2231, Ext. 202 
Reece, Ralph. Edmonton, GE 2-2713, GE 2-2131 
Ricketts. Claude O., 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, WE 

7-8610, ME 4-1551, Ext. 220. 
Riggs William T.. 103 W. McElroy St.. Morganfield. 170, Hen- 
derson. VA 7-9894 „^ „^,, 
Ritter Goebel, 104 Wooten St., Hazard, GE 6-2453. GE b-3511 
Roberts Earl C, 204 Stratford. Richmond, 153W, 2606 
Robinson. Pearl. 104 Deer St. Box 87, Manchester, LY 8-5791, 

3541 
Rose. Ronald, P. O. Box 667. Alva. Morris 4-2071 
Rose. Wally. 623 Southridge. Lexington 2-7265 
Rothfuss, Dick. 37 Gregory Ln., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-9190, HI 

1-G990 
Eunyon. Tommy D., Box 181. Belfry, EL 3-7883 
Scott, Donald G. Beverly. ED 7-3300 
Scott. Emmanuel H.. 1614 Potter Place. Cincinnati 7, Ohio, 

AV 1-6928. MU 1-6150 
Seibert. Billy Ray. 301 Mineral St.. Dawson Springs. SW 7-2280 
Shackleford. Roscoe. 612 Maple St., Hazard, 6-3467 
Sherrow. Winston G., Box 214. Beattyville. IN 4-2563 
Slucher. Kenneth W.. Box 42. ShelbyviUe. PA 2-5231. PA 2-5120 
Smith, Elmer, Garrard 

Stamper, Harold Boyd. Helechawa. SH 3-3110 
Steely. Stanley E.. Mt. A.sh. 4-8318 

Stephenson. Harry. 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620. 4-2431 
Sykea. Harry N.. 439 Bamberger Rd.. Lexington. 5-2262, 2-0640 
Tackett. Harold. Olive Hill. FA 6-6356 

Tackett. Jay, Route 3, Georgetown. Stamping Ground 832-6653 
Taylor Edwin. 435 North 4l8t St., Louisville 12, SP 2-0126, 

JU 7-6526 
Taylor. Rogers E.. Grandvi. 

MU 4-5201 

Thomas, M. L., 116 Holly, Berea, 986-4702 (Bus.) 
Thomas. James G., 1516 Oleanda Ct. No. 3, Louisville, EM 

3-0209, EM 3-0209 
Triplett, Herby. P. O. Box 552, Ov 
Varble, William E.. 1705 Cypress. 

2-3621 
Vermillion. Charles D.. 102 Poplar St.. Corbin 
Wanchic, Nicholas. Route 0, Lexington, 6-1233. 2-8328 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carncal, Lexington, 5-2743, 2-6494 



Owensboro, MU 4-6992. 



dngsville 
Louisville, SP 5-6712, 



Wells, Bobby W., Box 541. Morehead St. College, Morehead 
Wells. Rufus Franklin, Lees College, Jackson. SH 3-3015 
White. Charles W.. 107 Short St.. Mt. Sterling. 1845. 266 
Whitehouse. Donald. Frankfort, CA 7-2231, Ext. 200 or 367, 

(Bus.) 
Whitev. Don. 636 Cecil Ave., Louisville, SP 6-7163, JU 4-5615 
Williams, Billy F.. P. O. Box 221. Irvine. 723-3345 
Williams. Rod Richard. P. O. Box 1987. Berea. 246 
Wise. Billy V.. 2112 St. Teresa. Lexington. 6-7449, 2-6494 
Wood, Ellsworth, Brooksville, 5-5438 
Wood, James W.. 1133 Avondale Rd.. Owensboro, MU 4-1789, 

MU 3-2401 
Wrav, Darrel. Water Valley. FL 5-2868 

Wright, James Lloyd, 317 Gano Ave., Georgetown, 450-W 
Wrigley, Joseph, 306 Marengo Dr.. Middletown, OH 5-8587, 

Eastern High School, Middletown 
Yates, Howard, Oil Springs, CY 7-3076 CY 73076 
Young, Lawrence, 28 Rowland Ave., Winchester, PI 4-2574 



The 1960 Cross Country 



f 




RUSSELL BANKS 

The St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 
eighth official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, which 
was held in Lexington on November 12. The team 
score was 60. First place was won by Russell Banks 
of Elizabethtown, with the time of 10:27.1. The St. 
Xavier team was coached by Jerry Denny. 

Scores of the ten full teams which qualified for 
the state run were as follows: St. Xavier, 60; Trinity, 
71; Butler, 83; Madison Central, 115; Elizabethtown, 
151; Morgan County, 211; Camargo, 246; College, 278; 
Simon Kenton,282; Trimble County, 322. 

The State Cross Country Run was held on the 
Picadome Golf Course, and was managed by the 
Spiked Shoe Society of the University of Kentucky. 
Officers of the Society are: John D. Baxter, President; 
Ben Patterson, Vice-President; Farno Cawood, Secre- 
tary; Allen Cleaver, Treasurer. Activities of the So- 
(■ Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Page Kve 



MADISON-MODEL— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left tu Ri^liti Front Row: Mgr. Oglesby. Brown, West, Ballou, Davidson, Moberly, Norris, Mgr. Eades, Mgr. 
Vernon. Second Row : Ass't Coach Boyd, Williams Durbin. Taylor, Harrison, Jimmy Congleton, Jerry Congleton, 
Combs, Adams, Stepp. Third Row : Coach Kidd, Todd, Collins, Long, Rivers, C. Congleton, Bosley, Murray, Rob- 
inson, Cormney, Lane, Ass't Coach Pike. 

BOWLING GREEN— WESTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Huffman, Duncan, Sledge, Haynes, Morehead, Campbell, Lindsey, Kemp, Taylor, 
Holland, Donaldson, Wallace. Second Row: Hicks, McGill, Durston, Graybruck, Craddock, Potter, Watt, Winkenhofer, 
Compton. Huddleston, Graves, Butt. Phelps. Third Row: Kersey, Gentry, Roddy, Godiel, Epley, Ramsey, Cohron, 
Lewis, Motley, Woosley, Upton, Colovos. Fourth Row : Ass't Coach Smithson, Coach Pickens, Mgr Kemp, Trainer 
Higgins, Mgr. Chapman, Ass't Coach Hancock, Ass't Coach Miller. 

McKELL— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



I 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Timberlake, Traylor, C. Munn, Spears, Tolliver, Wright, Mercer, Hdrton, R. Bruce, 
Keib'er, French, Craycraft. Second Row: Smith, Boggs, G. Sammons, Lowdenback, Stone, T. Howard. Miller, Hayden, 
Chaff in. Carver, Simpson, Allen, Coach Sims. Third Row: Slater, R. Munn, P. Bentley, B. Wagner, G. Vanover, D. 
Howard, Reynolds, Riggs, Palmer, Collins, Lewis, J. Wagner. Fourth Row: Coach Moore, Collier, R. Vanover, 
Osborne, Bush, Johnson, D Hardin, G. Bentley, D. Sammons, Gilliam, J. Hardin, Boyles, Coach C. Bruce. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

Have you ever considered joining The Cor- 
onary Thrombosis Club? You who are lead- 
ers of Kentucky's schools and athletic pro- 
grams should think over carefully the fol- 
lowing article v.'ritten by my friend, L. A. 
HaiTis, Superintendent of Recreation and 
Parks of Hopkins, Minnesota: 

"Join The Coronary Thrombosis Club" 

"Never say 'no," accept all invitations to 
meetings, banquets, committees. Why have 
drive if you don't use it. Go to the office 
evenings, Saturdays, Sundays, and Holidays. 
Your job comes first; personal consideration 
is secondary. 

"Take the briefcase home evenings and 
week ends. You can then review all the 
troubles and worries at your leisure. If you 
hold night meetings, be on the job eaiiy the 
next morning. Tomorrow is another meeting. 
Don't eat restful, relaxing meals. Always 
plan a conference for the meal hour or rush 
out and grab a 'Quickie.' 

"Never attend MRA meetings as it is 
wasting valuable time hearing of new ideas 
and methods instead of devoting time to de- 
tails. Believe it a poor policy to take all the 
vacation allowed you. Keep in touch with the 
office daily. If your work calls for traveling, 
work all day and drive all night to keep the 
next morning's appointment. Regard fish- 
ing, hunting, traveling, gardening as a waste 
of time and money. Above all, after your 
leaders have gone to bed, get those reports 
and registrations in workable order for the 
next day. 

"Never delegate responsibility to others — 
carry the entire load vourself AND THEN 
DROP DEAD!" 

To keep from becoming a member of this 
club you must relax and have fun. Kentuck- 
ians see to it that the Dutchman always has 
a good time. Clyde Lassiter, Personable Prin- 
cipal of Lexington's Henry Clay High School, 
just called to invite the "Dutch Flyer" to 
make the football banquet address for his 
gridders. Nothing is more enjoyable than an 
evening with Clyde and John Heber. 

Hazard's Coach Goebel Ritter started a 
chain reaction when he asked for informa- 
tion on Biddy Ba.sketball for youngsters of 
elementary school age. Now the Dutchman 
is "swamped" with requests for this infor- 
mation from all over the Commonwealth. So 
— Here it is, fellows ! 

Biddy Basketball 

Dimensions and Specifications of National 
Biddy Basketball. 



OVERALL COURT DIMENSIONS— 50 ft. 
by 30 ft. Additional space — Where possible, 
an obstruction-free lane of three feet is rec- 
ommended. 

BACKBOARDS. 4 ft. wide x 3 ft. deep. 
Backboard should be placed wherever pos- 
sible, 2 to 4 feet inside the boundary lines. 
The goal must be 8 14 feet above the playing 
floor. 

GOALS. Metal goals of round 5 8 inch, 17 
inches in diameter. 

INSIDE SPACE ON FREE-THROW 
LANES. Minimum 2 feet from end line. 

TEN SECOND LINES. Drawn by ex- 
tending free-throw line (right and left.) 

ALL LINES WITH EXCEPTION OF 
FREE-THROW LINE. Should be 2 inches 
wide. Free-throw line should be one inch 
wide. 

Here is a salute to Joe Richardson, a reg- 
ional representative of officials in Western 
Kentucky. It is richly deserved and comes in 
the form of a letter from Bobby Anderson, 
Sports Editor of The Messenger and The 
Times-Argus, Muhlenberg County's oldest 
and largest newspapers : 

"Dear Dutchman : 

"I noted in the ATHLETE for October 
the note from Joe Richardson concerning his 
clinic in September. Joe had a good, good 
clinic, with many coaches and officials pres- 
ent, as well as timers, scorers and an inkling 
of fans. I was there for the newspaper. 

"I am enclosing the picture and the clip- 
ping for no particular reason, unless its just 
my way of saying I think Joe is doing a real 
good job. 

"Incidentally, Joe was recently a unani- 
mous choice for honors on the all-team for 
his Hughes-Kirk School, voted by fans of 
the school. 

"Since coming here in 1950, I have not 
missed a copy of the Athlete and your col- 
umn. Fine man, I enjoy it. Bobby". 

Thanks, Bobby! We could not use the pic- 
ture of Joe because it was a profile and does 
not do justice to this "kid's" manly facial 
charm. Send us a front view of "Jumpin' 
Joe" for our next column. 

The South Central Officials Association 
of Elizabethtown announces the following 
officers for 1960-61: Charles Akins, Presi- 
dent; Carroll Elliott, Vice-President; Jimmy 
Elmore, Secretary-Treasurer; Kenneth Bun- 
nell, Public Director; Howard Gardner, 
Scheduling Officer. 

With the ba.sketball season just starting, 
officials are urged to take the following 
r)hilosophy from The Flying Dutchman: 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Page Seven 



PAINTSVILLE— REGION III CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Rightl Fiont Row: T. I'reston, Tackett, May, Howaid. Gamboe, Davis, Haiioy, Lyons. Mut^k, Ciaft, 
Tuiner, Pack. Second Row: Porter, Hughes, C. Williams, R. Preston, Daniel, Minix, Craft, Roberts, J Preston, Allen, 
VanHoose, K. Williams Third Row: Coach Brugh, Happenny, Crisp. Porter, Hayes, Herald, Hamilton, Mullins, 
Jones, Carroll, Wells, Ward. 



ELIZABETHTOWN— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Eight) Front How: Snead, Boykin, Daniels, Gaddy, Bla 
J. Tuck. Dixie. -Second Row: Spalding, Manley, Perry, Bird,."Hibbs 
Gaines, Crabtree, Ringo, Sartin. Third Row: Hash, Boykin. H: 
Jefferies, Miller. Brumfield, L. Tuck. Boaz, Beck, Welch, Phillips... 



Maffett. Garner, Drane. Pettigrew, Allen, 
larrett. Jenkins, Heady. Gray, Riggs, Goody, 
lOH. Koziel. Phelp, Brandenburg, Combs, 



EVARTS— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




if^^^ 







(Left to Right) Front Row: L. Meeks, D. Meeks, Shakleford. Davis. J Meeks, Bradford, D. Evans. Toby. 
Price, Sergent. Second Row: Zornes, Redwine, Stevens. J. Hensley, Osborne, R Evans. Vanover. Carr. Ellis. Miracle. 
Third Row: Coach Hunter, Coins, Mulkey, Harp, Mullins, Cornett, L. Hensley, Wynn, Yount. Ass't Coach Kochin. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



HAZARD— E.K.M.C. AND REGION IV CLASS AA CHAMPION 




0.i:,!s,fi,ii.fi.it 






(Left to Rightl Front Row: Fitzpatrick, Burklow, Turpin, S. Williams. Cannon. W. Degley. C. W. Begley, Bryant, 
Cox. J. Davis. Second Row: Smith. Davidson. Vermillion, Kidd. S. Lindon. C. Williams. Caudill. Joseph. R. Lindon. 
Philon, Nunn. Third Row: A. J. Davis, Haddix, Sinor, Pigman, D Bailey, Bellis, R. Bailey, Thomas, Roberts, 
Nolan, Green. Fourth Row: Stacy. Edwards, Cecil. Campbell. Panky, Pennington, Asbury, Tate, Muncy, Robinson 



THE 1960 CROSS COUNTRY 

(Continued from Page Four) 
ciety are supervised by Dr. Don Cash Seaton, Head 
of the Department of Physical Education and Track 
Coach at the University of Kentucky. 

Seven regional runs had been held on October 29 
for the purpose of qualifying teams and individuals for 
the state event. These runs were held at Paducah, 
Bowling Green, Clarkson, Louisville, Bellevue, Lex- 
ington, and Paintsville. In addition to the teams, sev- 
eral individual runners qualified as entrants for the 
state affair. 

Eighty-one boys took part in the State Cross 
Country Run. The order in which the first fifty fin- 
ished is given below, including the times. 

1— Banks, Elizabethtown (10:27.1); 2— Edmunds, 
John's Creek (10:30); 3 — Havens, Montgomery Co., 
(10:38); 4— Wiggington, St. Xavier (10:39). 5— Kroh, 
St. Xavier (10:40); G— Elliott, Butler (10:42); 7— 
Gallagher, Lexington Catholic (10:44); 8 — Baker, 
Trinity (10:45); 9— B. Vetter, St. Xavier (10:45); 
10— Bealmear, Trinity (10:47); 11— Owens, Trinity 
(10:49); 12— Crawley, Butler (10:49); 13— Kirby, 
Butler (10:51); 14— Wathen, St. Joseph Prep., (10:53); 
15— Marshall, Madison Central (10:55); 16 — Cunning- 
ham, Trinity (11:03); 17— Conlon, St. Xavier (11:05); 
18 — Price, Madison Central (11:06); 19— Dunson, Madi- 
son Central (11:06); 20— Burnett, Elizabethtown 
(11:06); 21— Beatty, Butler (11:07); 22— Kemplin, 
Camargo (11:10); 23— Wolfe, Holmes (11:10); 24— 
Gai-vin, College (11:11); 25 — B. Vetter, St. Xavier 
(11:11); 2f>— Kelty, Trinity (11:13); 27— Brooks, 
Southern (11:13); 28— Vest, Morgan Co., (11:15); 29— 
Moll, Trinity (11:16) 30— Hall, Madison Central 
(11:17); 31— Rus.sell, Butler (11:17); 32— Clifford, St. 
Xavier (11:18); 3.3— Ward, Madison Central (11:18); 
34— Embry, Butler (11:20); 35— Vance, Elizabethtown 



(11:20); 36— McMahan, Taylor Co. (11:21); 37— 
Blevins, John's Creek (11:22); 38 — Norsworthy, Mor- 
gan Co. (11:23); 39^Jones, St. Joseph Prep. (11:24); 
40— T. Gallagher, Lexington Catholic (11:24); 41— 
Wilcox, Butler (11:26); 42— Oaks, Trimble Co. (11:29); 
43 — Lewis, Morgan Co. (11:31); 44 — Brautigan, Simon 
Kenton (11:31); 45— Noakes, Simon Kenton (11:33); 
46 — Parker, Camargo (11:36); 47 — Barnes, Elizabeth- 
town (11:39); 48— Maffet, Elizabethtown (11:40); 49 
— Tallent, Simon Kenton (11:41); 50 — Evans, Morgan 
Co. (11:47). 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
Make your decisions without apology or ex- 
planation, hustle, signal every call, keep your 
whistle in your mouth, toss the ball hi 'her 
than either .jumper can jump and toss it at 
a right angle to the floor, and once again 
hustle. One final thought: If you are not 
courageous, don't waste your hard-earned 
money buying a whistle. 

The Com Cob Pipe for December goes to 
Principal Kay Niman of Fern Creek. Through 
his unselfish service and his desire to ad- 
vance his community, something has hap- 
pened on the school grounds at Fern Creek 
that the Dutchman has not seen at any other 
school in or out of Kentucky. Next time you 
are driving on Bardstown Road, take a look 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Page Nine 



PADUCAH TILGHMAN— REGION I CLASS AA CHAMPION 








(Left to Eight) Front Row: Ward. Treece, Benson, Floyd, Harris, Farmer, Robinson. Kell, Heater. Blohm, Hunt, 
Chandler, Stubblefield. Second Row: Mengel. Richards. Terry Thomas. Bowland. Brown, Collier, Burton, Jones, 
Lemon, Horn, Tommy Thomas, Rose. Third Row : Largey, Michelson, Stiller, Wagner, Troutman, Bryant, Stites. 
Overton, Treece, Barkley. Morgan, Hill, Hartline. Fourth Row: Sollitto, Tomes, Johnson, J. Marshall, S. Marshall 
Black. Ray, Cannon. Horn. McClintock, Croom, Davis, Caneer. Fifth Row: Lemon, Brower, Hyde, Myers, 
Humphrey. Baker. Bradford, Keller, Todini. Managers Lyles and Brown. 



at a beautiful golf course located on Fern 
Creek's school grounds covering thirty-five 
acres. Kay sparked the civic leaders and a 
golf course which drew almost ten thousand 
paid participants this season resulted. 

Here's a closing thought for coaches as 
they hire officials for their games : "The 
bitterness of poor quality kills the sweet- 
ness of low price." 



EARLY SEASON BASKETBALL 
(Continued from Page One) 

foul and a false double foul. (6-2) 

13. Play: A6 has reported to the Scorer, giving his 
name, number and position. A held ball is called and 
Official beckons him onto the court. As soon as A6 
enters court he requests a time-out. 

Ruling: This is legal and time-out should be grant- 
ed team A. (3-3 Question; 5-8-d) 

14. Play: Can an air dribble occur any time or 
must it occur at the beginning or the end of a dribble ? 

Ruling: Not more than one air dribble may be 
made during a dribble and it may be made at any 
time during the dribble. (9-5) 

15. Play: Field goal try by Al is successful. There 
is no violation and the ball falls to the floor after go- 
ing through the net without being touched by either 
team. A2 calls time-out. 

Ruling; Request by A2 should be granted. (5-8-d) 

16. Play: Al and Bl strike each other with their 
fists during a dead ball. Immediately after the fight, 



B2 curses the Referee. 

Ruling: The three fouls are technical and flagrant. 
This is a false double foul. Two technicals are assessed 
against team B and one agamst team A. Al, Bl, and 
B2 are immediately disqualified from the game. Any 
player of team A, including an incoming player, may 
attempt the four free throws awarded it and any 
player of team B, including an incoming player, may 
attempt the two free throws awarded team B. Play 
will be resumed by a jump ball in center circle between 
any two opponents. (4-7-b; 8-7) 

17. Play: A6 reports to Scorer, indicating he will 
replace Al. The quarter ends before Official on the 
floor can wave him into the game. Before the next 
quarter starts, the Coach decides to leave Al in the 
game and A6 returns to the bench. 

Ruling: Legal. (3-3) 

IS. Play: Al commits his fifth personal foul but, 
before Officials or Scorers notify him, a substitute 
takes his place in the game. Later, Al enters the 
game again and, after participating, the Scorer notes 
that Al has five personal fouls and so notifies the 
Official. 

Ruling: Technical foul. Al must leave the game 
immediately. (10-5) 

19. Play: Al erroneously is given two free throws 
rather than only one and he makes both. Error is dis- 
covered: (a) just prior to B's attempted throw-in; or 
(b) subsequent to the throw-in by B. 

Ruling: In (a), cancel A's second throw and per- 
mit B to put ball in play with throw-in at end line 
by A's basket. In (b), it is too late to rectify the error 
and the point scored on the second throw is counted. 
(10-7-Note) 

20. Play: What is the purpose of handing the ball 



i 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



CAVERNA— BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 






l:^**- 
^ ■■^■"f 












I Left to Right) Front Row: D. Doyle. Grider, Gilpin, Moore. McCubbin. Rogers. Kneeling in front. Mgr. Smith. 
Second Row : Coach Robinson. Cherry. Thompson. O. Doyle. Palmore. C. Logsdon. Scott. Branstetter. B. Wilson. Ass't 
Coach Chapman. Third Row: Strickland, D. Logsdon, Jewell. G. Logsdon. A. C. Wilson. Sublett. 



to a player to make a throw-in from out of bounds at 
tie front court? 

Ruling: The purpose is to make the decision clear. 
It is not the intent of the provision to delay the game 
until the Defensive team gets "set." (2-9-b) 

21. Play: Al has been in the back court with the 
held ball for approximately 8 seconds when Bl bats 
it fi'om him but Al recovers. Does the 10-seeond count 
continue for team A ? 

Ruling: The 10-second count does continue for 
team A. Nothing has occurred to terminate control by 
team A. The 10-seeond count is based upon team con- 
trol and is, therefore, continuous in this situation. (9-8) 

22. Play: Field goal ti^y by Al goes into the basket 
and below the ring but it bounces out the top when 
the ball strikes the inside of the net. 

Ruling: No goal has been scored and ball con- 
tinues in play. (5-1) 

2.3. Play: As the lesult of a bat or throw by Al 
or Bl, a live ball enters the basket from below and 
goes halfway through the ring and then falls back 
through the net towards the floor. 

Ruling: Not a violation. The ball I'emains in play. 
(9-4) 

24. Play: Al has been in his back court with the 
ball for approximately 8 .seconds when Bl bats the 
ball fiom him but Al recovers it. Does the 10-second 
count continue for team A ? 

Ruling: The IC-second count continues. Nothing 
has occurred to terminate team control by team A. 
(9-8) 

2.5. Play: May a player catch the ball with both 
feet off the floor, alight wtih both feet simultaneously, 
jump and again alight with both feet touching the 
floor simultaneously, then step with one foot, jump 
into the air and pa.ss the ball before either foot again 
touches the floor? 



Ruling: No. This is a violation of the running rule. 
(4-17) 

26 Play: Al requests a time-out: (a) after he has 
consumed 4 seconds in attempting to make a throw-in 
from out of bounds; or (b) while in control of the ball 
in his back court and 8 seconds have elapsed; or (c) 
just as the Official is handing Bl the ball ball for a 
free throw. 

Ruling: Official should not grant the time-out in 
either(a), (b) or (c) because a change in the status 
of the ball is imminent or is about to occur. (5-8-d) 

27. Play: Al is disqualified because of a fifth per- 
sonal foul. Coach of A takes P-2 minutes to replace 
Al. 

Ruling: There is no violation. There is no delay 
imtil after the time available for replacement has ex- 
pired. (5-9-d) 

28. Play: Al makes a throw-in at mid-comt and he 
is first to touch the throw-in near B's basket. 

Ruling: Violation. B is awarded ball for a throw- 
in at its own end line at the spot out of bounds nearest 
to where Al touched his own throw-in. (7-5) 

29. Play: A6, substituting at beginning of second 
half for Al who played during the first half, fails to 
report to Scorer's table. He enters the court and, 
after Referee has received the ready signal from the 
bench, the Referee gets the acknowledgment from 
Captain of team A that his team is ready to proceed. 

Ruling: The Referee will assess a technical foul 
against team A before the jump ball at center takes 
place. Any player of team B may attempt the fi-ee 
throw and team B is awardtid ball out of bounds at 
mid-court for the throw-in. In this situation there is 
no jump ball to start the second half. (3-3) 

30. Play: Who is responsible for behavior of the 
.spectators ? 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Page Eleven 



EASTERN— REGION II CLASS AAA CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Sims, Carr, Bailey, Wilhoyte, Wheeler. Huggins, Watson. Chaney. Second Row: 
Randolph, White, Forchi, Smith, Lotz, Moose. Rosenbaum, B. Montgomery. Third Row ; Wearren. Mouser, Temple, 
Summer. Daniels. Horton. G. Montgomery, Siers, Roos, Brown. Fourth Row: McQuillen, Phelps. Schmead, Pruitt, 
Bell, Foreman, Baltzell, Campbell, Adamson, Johnson, Simco. 



Ruling: The home management or game com- 
mittee, insofar as they can be reasonably expected 
to control the spectators. The Official may call fouls 
on a team whose fans interfere with the proper con- 
duct of the game. Discretion must be used in calling 
such fouls to prevent unjust penalty. (2-6; 10-6) 

31. Play: The score is A67-B64, with about 15 
seconds remaining in the game when Bl scores a field 
goal, making it A67-B66. Team B, which has used only 
two of its time-outs, immediately requests a time-out. 

Ruling: The fact that the request occurs during 
the last few seconds of play does not affect the situa- 
tion from the rules standpoint. The time-out should be 
granted team B, even if A is holding the ball out of 
bounds, unless the status of the ball is about to change 
from dead to live. (5-8-d) 

32. Play: Stopped clock indicates two seconds re- 
main before the 3rd quarter ends. Al misses free 
throw. A2 gets rebound and misses field goal try. Bl 
secures rebound and dribbles down court across division 
line well into his front court before charging into A3 
just as the horn sounds. Referee consults Timer, who 
acknowledges he did not start the clock when Al miss- 
ed the free throw. 

Ruling: If the Referee is positive that, had the 
Tirner started the clock at the proper instant, time 
would have expired before Bl charged into A3, he 
would rule that the quarter had expired before the con- 
tact and the foul would be ignored unless it is un- 
sportsmanlike. (2-4) 

33. Play: If an Official, on his own initiative, takes 
a time-out to protect an injured player should a time- 
out be charged to the team? 

Ruling: Unless the injured player is replaced 
within one and one-half minutes or unless the player 



is ready to play immediately, the time-out must be 
charged to the team for whose benefit it was taken. 
After calling the time-out, the Official should ask the 
player if he desires a time-out. If he does not, play 
should be resumed at once. If, while time is out, the 
Coach or Trainer has been granted permission to come 
onto the court to attend the player, the time-out must 
be charged unless the player is removed. Under no 
condition does the Official have any authority to 
charge the time-out to himself. (5-8-e) 

34. Play: A guard has established a guarding 
position in the path of his opponent, who has the ball. 
The opponent attempts to dribble around his guard. 
The guard steps to maintain his position in the path 
of his opponent but before he is able to place his foot 
on the floor the dribbler charges into the front part of 
his body. Is the dribbler responsible for the contact? 

Ruling: The dribbler is responsible for the con- 
tact. Two facts support this answer. First, the 
guard had established a guarding position in the path 
of the dribbler. He was thereafter moving or shifting 
to continue to keep in the dribbler's path. Secondly, 
the dribbler charged into the front of the guard, 
which indicates that he was maintaining his position 
in the path of the dribbler. The point of contact is 
important in this case. 

The phrase "if he jumps into position, both feet 
must return to the floor," which is part of Question 1 
under Rule 10, Section 7, does not affect the ruling of 
this play. This phrase is coverage for a possible situa- 
tion where a guard might jump to get into the path 
of a dribbler and, while he was in the air or before 
both feet hit the the floor, be charged by the dribbler. 
In this case the guard would be responsible for the 
contact. It is not intended to apply to a guard who is 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1960 



Season's 
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*7^e KUtfde*t GampxiHif general agent 



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stepping or shifting to stay in the path of a dribbler 
after having established a guarding position. 

In this play, if the dribbler had run into the leg 
of the guard instead of charging into the front of his 
body, the guard would have been responsible for the 
contact. Even if the guard had placed his foot on the 
floor as the dribbler tripped over it, the guard would 
still be responsible for the contact. On the other hand, 
if the guard had not moved his foot or leg into the 
path of the dribbler and the dribbler had tripped over 
the guard's leg, the dribbler would be responsible for 
the contact. Basic principles 1 and 3 on Page 28 of the 
1960-61 Rules Book apply in these situations. (10-7) 



Kv. D.G.W.S. News 



Miss Kitty E. Rogers, Centre College staff mem- 
ber and Chaimian of the Kentucky Division of Girls 
and Women's Sports, A.A.H.P.E.R., has sent the state 
office of the K.H.S.A.A. a list of chainnen in the var- 
ious sports sponsored by her organization. These are 
as follows: Aquatics — Betty Blanton, University of 
Kentucky, Lexington; Archery — Nan Ward, Box 865, 
Morehead; Basketball — Ruth Hammack, Danville High 
School, Danville; Bowling — Margaret Sheegog, duPont 
Manual High School, Louisville; Golf — Robye Ander- 
son, Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green; 
Hockey, speedball, soccer — Elaine Smith, Berea Col- 
lege, Berea; Softball — Ann Karrick, Clark County High 
School, Winchester; Tennis — Betty Langley, College 
High School, Bowliri'i Green; Track and Field — Mrs. 
George Sadler, Campbellsville College, Campbellsville; 
Volleyball — Barbara Farley, Perryville High School, 
Perryville; Outing Activities — Lois Massie, University 
of LouisviDe, Louisville. 



Following are excei-pts from a letter written re- 
cently by Miss Rogers to the Commissioner: 

"Plans have been made by our state volleyball chair- 
man for three high school volleyball sports days to 
be held in three different locations in the state .... 
Plans are being made for district track and field meets 
for high school girls to be held in the spring, and 
scores will be sent on official entry blanks to the 
state chairman for state competition." 

"Over one hundred letters have been sent to women 
physical educators throughout the state in an effort to 
create a greater interest in the promotion of sports 
according to D.G.W.S. standards and principles. At the 
fall D.G.W.S. meeting alone, nearly 150 sports rule 
books were purchased or ordered by those present, 
which is an indication that many high schools will 
be using the up-to-date D.G.W.S. official guides for 
sports this year — some for the first time. The state 
handbook is now being revised to include all per- 
sonnel changes, etc. 

"We have added to our committee several new 
sports chaii'men this year which means that we are 
increasing the number of sports to be emphasized in 
the state. Among these are golf, aquatics, archery, 
bowling and tennis. There was much enthusiasm 
among our group about the state tennis tournament 
that was held in the spring and we wish to say a 
special 'thank you' to you for the work which you did 
in promoting this. 

"Much of the work of this organization would have 
been impossible without the fine financial assistance of 
K.H.S.A.A. We especially want to thank you for the 
special interest and cooperation which you have given 
to our program." 



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Hiqh School AHiMe 

Class AA State Champion Highlands 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Roger Waltz, Jim Biltz, Gary Sheanshang, Jim Ullman, Bill Montfort, 
Gary Carnan, Charles Taylor, Jim Burt, Phil Chrisman, Charles Hoffman, Marc Kuhnhein, John Burt, 
Mike Lawson, Bill Bradlep, Ken Martens. Second Row: Jim Borches, John Hicks, Allen Law, Jerry Zint 
ScottCrooks,JackGish,BobDziech, George Lee, Dan Fox, Bill Daley, Richard West, Powell Smith. 
Alan Berry, Doug Moode, Harry Reif. Third Row: Bob Heinze, Bruce Baumgartner, Fred Partin, Doug 
McCammish, John Staubitz, Bob Steinhauser. Joe Ross, Bill Gibson, Ken Honchell, C. R. Lyons Charlie 
Rogers, Jack Flaig, Bill Goodwin. 

ni^hS t^?^^"V ^ , „ Highlands 33-AshIand 

H fhS 9n p'*"'^'^^^^ ^^\^^ Highlands 53-Holmes 

H Ih ^«^ ^SZpTr *^T*^ * Highlands 61-Campbell County 

H £hc f ^v "^^^w \ Highlands 46-Dixie Heights 

HiVhSttlS'T"^,? „ Highlands 26-Hazard 13 

Highlands 26-Bowlmg Green 13 Highlands 21-Lafayette 13 



Offical Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN, 
JANUARY - ISBl 



LOUISVILLE MALE— CLASS AAA STATE CHAMPION 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: Phelps. Bolus. Morris. Johnson. Ennis. Bieber. Hedden Blankenshio riintnn I 



LYNCH EAST MAIN— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 
AND CLASS A STATE CHAMPION 




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roach Rill BoHch. James (Jr^er Johnny Powell Clarei« Wn«. II l.'r^ "^ "Z"^, 'V'"'t„.'=>' '"''•''<-'^' Ass't 

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Kow . Tracy Calloway. Truman McOeorRe. Adam Hoiska. Smith Jenkins. Rudy Hlllen. James Catchine. James Powell 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ o/ ^e 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1961 



1.00 Per Year 



Commissioner's Message 

The problem of developing "a high type of sports- 
manship among schools, athletes, and the general 
public," as suggested in the K.H.S.A.A. constitution, 
is one to which school administrators and coaches might 
give their attention. Many are doing this and have been 
doing so for a long time. 

We believe that sportsmanship at the high school 
level improves each year. However, a coach occasionally 
removes his team from the floor because of poor of- 
ficiating, issues a statement to the press that "we wuz 
robbed," or looks the other way when one of his basket- 
ball players exhibits an ugly attitude toward an of- 
ficial. We shudder to think what an attitude like this 
does to a team, a student body, or a community. 

Dr. Rhea H. Williams, writing in the Texas Inter- 
scholastic Leaguer, thinks that respect for constituted 
authority can be one of the most important outcomes of 
a good athletic program. We reprint his editorial be- 
cause we think that it is especially timely. 

Respect for Law 

There are many values which accrue through properly 
directed interschool athletics. One of the most import- 
ant of these is the opportunity to learn respect for 
constituted authority. There are many trends in our 
present-day society which indicate that there is a 
definite lack of respect for constituted authority on the 
part of the public and students. This is exemplified 
daily in the many instances of disrespect and outright 
antagonism toward our peace officers, game officials 
in athletics and others who have been designated to 
enforce certain rules which have been agreed upon in 
advance. 

In recent weeks throughout the state of Texas there 
have been many newspaper reports dealing with at- 
tacks on peace officers by laymen who undoubtedly are 
guilty of such items as speeding, drinking and other law 
violations but who resent and do not respect constituted 
authority. 

This same trend is found daily in the sports columns 
of our newspapers as is exemplified by the college or 
high school coach who claimed that he was robbed be- 
cause of a decision made by an official or by a local 
coach or newspaper columnist who claimed that the 
game the past weekend was lost through the ineffic- 
iency of game officials. 

The game officials are invited by a school to work 
their game. Both schools have agreed that the game 
will be played under a certain set of rules, and yet when 
any decision is made with which they do not agree they 
immediately begin to rebel. In most cases, the com- 
plaints result in physical attack and in embarrassment 
to all parties involved. 

Perhaps one of the most insidious and harmful effects 
of this philosophy which is permeating so much of our 
society relative to constituted authority is the psycho- 
logical effect. There is a growing tendency on the part 
of those who have had a misfortune or who have not 



succeeded or who have failed to win an athletic activity 
to blame it on some other individual or group, usually 
on those who have enforced a rule because they are in 
the position of constituted authority. 

If coaches, administrators and fans are to fulfill one 
of the major objectives of athletics, which is to teach 
respect for constituted authority, then they must in- 
doctrinate and educate the athletes under their control 
in this direction. There are ample experiences available 
in the athletic program for this. 

Perhaps one of the most important of these is the 
ability of an individual player to learn to respect the 
constituted authority which resides in the coach as a 
teacher. Another splendid illustration is that when 
athletes are participating in games they should realize 
that the officials who are calling the game are the 
constituted authorities for this game and that even 
though they do not agree with all the decisions, they 
must learn to respect and to abide by these decisions. 

It is very difficult, however, for athletes on the play- 
ing field to gain the proper concepts for obeying con- 
stituted authority when they see the coach or hear fans 
deriding the decisions of the officials. 

There is a feeling among many of our people that 
democracy means that each person or group has a 
right to their own beliefs and actions, regardless of 
the rights of others. Nothing could be further from 
the truth, as this would be anarchy. In democracy the 
rights of other people must be respected, and a de- 
mociacy is government by the will of the majority and 
a government by law and not of people. Athletics offer 
one of the greatest opportunities to develop in youth 
a respect for law and a respect for constituted 
authority. 

It is up to our coaches, teachers and interested lay- 
men to see that this spirit is inculcated in the youth 
of our state, and only by setting the proper example of 
respect for constituted authority can we expect our 
high school athletes to receive this most valuable at- 
tribute from our interschool athletic program. 

Athletics are very similar to atomic power in that 
they can be used for either good or bad, depending on 
the leadership provided by the coach, the school and the 
community. Athletics can, therefore, create in the boy 
the proper respect, the proper regard and the proper 
prestige for constituted authority; or it can create in 
the boy disrespect and a complete lack of respect for 
constituted authority. 

Because of the emotions which are so closely inte- 
grated with athletics, there is always the possibility for 
this lack of respect to flare out sporadically unless 
careful and continual guidance is provided for our 
youth. 

Only by the proper direction and supervision can we 
justify our athletic program. It is up to everyone 
interested in athletics to see that the proper respect 
for constituted authority is provided in all areas of 
our life. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



DECEMBER, 1960 



VOL. XXni— No. 5 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 
Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor _ THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Vice-President W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors— W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-62). Louisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63). Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-64). Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



rrom 



tlie Q 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1960 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

A large number of K. H. S. A. A. registered offic- 
ials qualified for the advanced rating of "Approved" 
and "Certified" as a result of the National Federation 
basketball examination, which was given in Kentucky 
on December 5, 1960. The "Approved" rating does not 
carry forward from year to year, but must be earned 
each year. After an official has received the "Certified" 
rating, he keeps this rating by clinic attendance. Only 
officials receiving these higher ratings are eligible to 
work in the regional tournaments. Only "Certified" 
officials, who are residents of Kentucky, are eligible 
to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 



Certified Offii 



Adkins, Raymond C. 
Alexander, Rex 
Arnold, Kenneth 
Baird, Bill 
Baker, James E. 
Ballard, Jack H. 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Black, Charles D. 
Blackburn, Viley 0. 
Bridges, Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Broderick, Carroll A. 
Brown, Bryant 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, James W. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Canter, John 
Casteel, Ralph M. 
Chattin, Charles 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke" 
Combs, Travis 
Conley, George 
Cooper, John Wellington 
Cooper, Warren 
Craft, Bill 



Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Crutcher, James W. 
Cummins, Al 
Davis, Don 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
Driskell, Earl Jr. 
Durkin, Jack 
Edelen, Ben R. 
Elrod, Wm. Turner 
Feix, Jimmie 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Fields, Joe D. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Fritz, Sherman 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Goley, James E. 
Goranflo, R. E. 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Haynes, John 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewling, Franklin 



Hodge, Fred 
Hodges, Holbert 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Huter, Jim 
Hyatt, Bob 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, Walter 
Jordan Kenneth P. 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
Kinman, Joe T. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Lance, Walter 
LeVan, Thomas F. 
Long, Bm 

Longenecker, David M. 
Looney, Dick 
Lucas, Gene 
Lytle, Price 
McCleUan, L. B. 
McGuffey, Harold 
McLeod, Robert N. 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Macon, Alan Leon 
Maines, George 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mays, Ralph J. 
Meade, Foster "Sid" 
Metcalfe, Earl L. 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Mudd, Ed 
Mussman, Ralph 
Nau, Bill 
Neal, Gene 
Newton, C. M. 
Nord, Ed 
Overly, Bill 
Padgett, R. K. 
Parker, Billie E. 
Peay, Curtis 



Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Pursiful, Cleophus 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myron 
Richards, Jim S. 
Richardson, Joe M. 
Ricketts, C. O. 
Riggs, William T. 
Roberts, Earl C. 
Roller, Otis 
Rothfuss, Dick 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rubarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
St. Clair, Robt. L., Jr. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Settle Evan E., Jr. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Earl 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Stanfill, Robert 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Strange, Bill 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weisbrodt, Paul 
Welch, Ralph W. 
Wells, Milford 
Wesche, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Tom M., Jr. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Jack 
Wurtz, Emil 
Yessin, Humzey 



Approved Officials 



Abemathy, George R. 
Allen, Lowry R. 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Bowling Roy 
Boyles, Paul E. 
Bradshaw, BUI 
Brewer, Randell 
Brown, John W. 
Brummett, Joseph W. 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Cossey, James L. 
Creelanore, Ken 
Davis, Bunny 
Davis, Harold T. 
Duerson, WiUiam R. 
Foster, William R. 
Green, Walter 
Hatter, Jack 
Howard, Carl 
Johnson, Wm. Bernard 



Lowe, Eugene T. 
McClure, Wm. S. 
McGehee, Gordon 
McMillin, Larry L. 
Mahan, Carle 
Matthews, Lyle 
Miller, Ferrel 
Moore, Robt. W., Jr. 
Newsom, Lawrence 
Nixon, James W. 
Riggs, Morgan E. 
Ritter, Goebel 
Roby, Joseph L. 
Selvy, Curt 
Strong, Amett 
Tucker, Neal R. 
Weaver, Ray 
Willis, Robert A. 
Wise, Billy 
Wright, Paul 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Page Three 



1960-61 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



School 



Address 



Principal 
REGION 1 



Baskethall Coach 



D. 1 Carlisle Comity 
Fulton 

Fulton County 
Hickman County 
Riverview 

D. 2 Ballard Memorial 
Heath 
Lincoln 
Lone Oak 
Paducah Tilghman 
Reidland 
St. John 
St. Mary's Acad. 

D. 3 Cuba 

Dunbar 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Lowes 

Mayfield 

Sedalia 

Symsonia 

Wingo 

D. 4 Benton 

Calloway County 
Douglass 
Murray 

Murray College 
North Marshall 
South Marshall 



R. 3, Bardwell 

Fulton 

Hickman 

Clinton 

Hickman 

Barlow 

R. 1, W. Paducah 

Paducah 

Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 8, Paducah 

R. 5, Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 1, Mayfield 

Mayfield 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Lowes 

Mayfield 

Sedalia 

Symsonia 

Wingo 

Benton 

Murray 

Murray 

Murray 

Murray 

Calvert City 

R. 1, Benton 



0. J. Mitchell 
J. M. Martin 
Tom Johnson 
James H. Phillips 
A. W. Greene 

Robert G. Fiser 
A. L. Roberts 

E. W. Whiteside 
John Robinson 
Bradford D. Mutchler 
Richard L. Winebarger 
Sr. Mary Marcia 

Sr. Julia Francis 

Joe McPherson 

F. I. Stiger 

Sr. Celine Maria 
C. W. Jones 
W. W. Chumbler 
Barkley Jones 
Bob Baker 
Cecil Reid 
Howard V. Reid 

Delton Dodds 
William B. Miller 
Leon P. MOler 
Fred Schultz 
Wilson Gantt 
Robert Goheen 
Reed Conder 



Tom Adkins 
Chester Caddas 
Harold Garrison 
Harold Romaine 
A. W. Greene 

James H. Frank 
William E. Carter 
John C. McVoy 
Gleen E. Dexter 
Otis Dinning 
Ervin Johnston 
Richard Clements, Rev. 
Jack McKinney 

Freed Curd 
Asberry Dawson 
Joe Mikez 
Larry Colley 
Gene Mason 
J. B. Story 
Ken Wray 
Bobby Noles 
Virgil Yates 

Billy Joe Farris 
Howard Crittenden 
John L. Prewitt 
Robt. Glenn Jeffrey 
GaiTett Beshear 
Charlie Lampley 
Mason Cope 



REGION 2 



D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


Dotson 


Princeton 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


Livingston 


Burna 


Lyon Coimty 


Kuttawa 


D. 6 Charleston 


Dawson Springs 


Dalton 


Dalton 


Earlington 


Earlington 


Hanson 


Hanson 


J. W. MUlion 


Earlington 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Nebo 


Nebo 


Rosenwald 


Madisonville 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


D. 8 Clifty 


Clifty 


Guthrie 


Guthrie 


Todd County 


Elkton 


Todd Co. Training 


Elkton 



William F. Brown 
Ercel Little 
B. S. Miller 
Odell Walker 
K. T. Hardin 
John E. Floyd 

Lewis Good 
A. O. Richards 
James W. Larmoiith 
David Siria 
Lester G. Mimms 
Weldon Hall 
Mrs. A. C. Cameal 
Mrs. Pearl M. Arnett 
Charles Jenkins 

Frank B. Simpson 
L Fred Porter 
R. A. Belt 
Chester C. Redmon 
Paul Perdue 

0. P. Hurt 
Waldo L. Wolfe 
Robert N. Bush 
Wm. T. Gilbert 



George Perry 
L. D. Gaston 
J. W. Withrow 
Robert Metcalfe 
Rex Smith 
Frank Wright 

Jewel Logan 
Edwin Martin 
James W. Larmouth 
William Shirley 
Lester G. Mimms 
Curtis Sherrell 
George B. Wooton 
Caldwell Smith 
Earl Adkins 

W. M. Falls, Sr. 
John Rendek 
John McCleam 
Roy Allison 
Duke Burnett 

Perry HOI 
A. R. Rochelle 
Harold Ross 
Jimmy Harris 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



School 



Address 



Principal 
REGION 3 



Basketball Coach 



D. 


9 Clay 


Clay 




Dixon 


Dixon 




Providence 


Providence 




Rosenwald 


Providence 




Sebree 


Sebree 




Slaughters 


Slaughters 


D. 


10 Douglass 


Henderson 




Dunbar 


Morganfield 




Henderson 


Henderson 




Henderson County 


Henderson 




Holy Name 


Henderson 




Morganfield 


Morganfield 




St. Agnes 


Uniontown 




St. Vincent Acad. 


St. Vincent 




Sturgis 


Sturgis 


D. 


11 Bremen 


Bremen 




Calhoun 


Calhoun 




Livermore 


Livermore 




Sacramento 


Sacramento 



D. 12 Daviess County Owensboro 

Owensboro Owensboro 

Ovifensboro Catholic Owensboro 

Western Owensboro 



Clifton Wilson 
P. D. Fancher 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Martin 
James M. Lynch 
Lloyd Sharp 

H. B. Kirkwood 
Chas. N. Crutcher 
Troy E. Spear 
Lewis N. Johnson 
Sr. Sara Ann 
Thomas Brantley 
Rev. R. G. Hill 
Sr. Raymimda 
H'Earl Evans 

Hoy R. Long 
L. D. Knight 
J. David Boyken 
Paul Phillips 

W. P. Wheeler 
Joe 0. Brown 
Sr. Helen Constance 
H. E. Goodlos 



Wayne Will son 
Estel Monasco 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Mai-tin 
Byron Watkins 
Eldon Bradley 

Peter Rembert 
George K. McGOl 
Chester Montgomery 
Nomian O'Nan 
James K. Lindenberg 
Bill Foster 
Rev. Anthony Ziegler 
Charles E. Mason 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 

Bob Rickard 
Don Parsons 
Don Walker 
Jude Talbott 

W. B. Sydnor 
Bob Watson 
William Settles 
Whaylow Coleman 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick-Fraize 
Hawesville 
Irvington 
Lewisport 
Meade County 

D. 14 Butler County 
Caneyville 
Clarkson 
Edmonson Co. 
Leitchfield 

D. 1.5 Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Fords ville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 

D. 16 Central City 
Community 
Drakesboro 
Graham 
Greenville 
Hughes-Kirk 
Muhlenberg Central 



Hardinsburg 

Vine Grove 

Cloverport 

Hawesville 

Irvington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Brownsville 

Leitchfield 

Beaver Dam 
Centertovym 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Drakesboro 

Graham 

Greenville 

Beechmont 

Powderly 



R. F. Peters 
H. W. Hunt 
Ora Watts 
B. H. Crowe 
W. 0. Jackson 
Forrest Williamson 
Stuart Pepper 

W. Foyest West 
Ramon Majors 
James M. Wood 
John M. Lane 
John H. Taylor 

Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 
Bryan Taylor 
Earl S. Reid 
Charles S. Combs 
W. M. Arnold 

Delmas Gish 
William Traylor 
W. F. Wilcutt 
James Jennings 
Ernest Atkins 
Wallace Ward 
Lyle Baugh 



Howard Owens 
Don Turner 
W. T. Bennett 
Denzel Mefford 
Jack Williamson 
Edgar Payne 
William Case 

W. 0. Warren, Jr. 
Bobbie Burres 
Bowman Davenport 
Dan King 
John H. Taylor 

Maurice Martin 
Dai-vis Snodgrass 
Bnace Stewart 
Charles S. Combs 
J. R. Whitehead 

Jackie Day 
Norman E. Pritchett 
James Hill 
Wayne Ewing 
Kenneth Sidwell 
Charles Fades 
Bob Daniels 



REGION 5 



D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 
Bristow 
College 

Franklin-Simpson 
High Street 



Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

R. 1, Bowling Green 

''owling Green 

Franklin 

Bowling Green 



Arthur M. Reynolds 
Raymond H. Hemdon 
Kenneth Harvey 
James Carpenter 
J. W. Dunn 
E. T. Buford 



James Walker 
Denval Barriger 
Jay Atkerson 
Al Almond 
John Price 
F. 0. Moxley 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Page Five 



School 

Lincoln 
North Warren 
Richards ville 
St. Joseph 
Warren County 

D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 

D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Bunche 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

D. 20 Clinton County 

Cumberland County 
Gamaliel 
Marrowbone 
Metcalfe County 
Tompkins ville 



Address 

Franklin 
Smiths Grove 
Richards ville 
Bowling Green 
Bowling Green 

Adairville 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Scottsville 
Lucas 
Glasgow 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
R. 4, Glasgow 

Albany 

Burkesville 

Gamaliel 

MaiTowbone 

Edmonton 

Tompkinsville 



Principal 

W. H. Story 
Andrew Renick 
George Coker, Jr. 
Sr. J. Lvnette Clarkson 
C. H. Harris 

Jesse L. Richards 
Ronald W. Clark 
Mo'Tis Shelton 
J. M. Vance 
W. N. Alexander 
Harold E. Hunter 

T. C. Simmons 
Kenneth B. Sidwell 
L. J. Twyman 
Edwin J. Mayes 
Frank NewbeiTy 
W. L. Gardner 
Doug-las W. Spears 
David Montgomery 

L. H. Robinson 
Leon King 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Garland Creech 
Randall Grider 



Basketball Coach 

William Griffith 
Robert Fox 
Robert J. Cover 
Bob Hoggard 
Jesse Kimbrough 

Ralph Sharp 
Jim Richards 
Thomas D. Garrett 
Van L. Washer 
Earl Shelton 
Jim Young 

James Bazzell 
Charles Day 
Frank TeiTsU 
Earl Bradford 
Robert Thum 
Al Ellison 
Ernest Neil 
Robert Pardue 

Lindle Castle 
LaiTy McDonald 
Tommy Downing 
W. K. Norris 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



REGION 6 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Dm-ham 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
Rosenwald 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 



Brooks Coomer 
Paul Coop 
M. J. Strong 
E. E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Mrs. W. R. Smith 
Sr. M. Anton 
Sr. Florentia 
Sr. Mai-y Carl 
J. G. McAnelly 



John Burr 
Paul Coop 
John R. Whiting 
Carl Deaton 
Hubert Edwards 
Herbert Jones 
Rev. Jas. L. Schlich 
Tom Clark 
Sam Thomas 
Billy B. Smith 



D. 22 Cavema 
Cub Run 
LaRue County 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



Horse Cave 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Hardyville 
Munfordville 



Wilbur Smith 
James E. Redden 
Everett G. Sanders 
Jimmy Edwards 
H. D. Puckett 



Ralph Dorsey 
Clyde E. Smith 
Corky Cox 
Reathel Goff 
Ray Hammers 



D. 23 Elizabethtown 

E'town Catholic 

Fort Knox 

Glendale 

Howevalley 

Lynnvale 

Rineyville 

Sonora 

Vine Grove 



Elizabethtovioi 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Glendale 
R. 1, Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Mary Janice 
S. M. Matarazzo 
Damon Ray 
Earl B. Goodman 
Kenneth Riddle 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 



Chas. Rawlings 
Hardin McLane 
Robert Burrow 
Edwin A. Goodman 
Larry Perry 
Albert McLane 
C. R. Perkins 
Claude Sharp 
Bill Jones 



D. 24 Bardstown 
Bloomfield 
Fredericktown 
Mackville 
Old Ky. Home 
St. Catherine 
St. Joseph Prep. 
Springfield 
Willisburg 



Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Mackville 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Vincent Zachem 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. Charles Asa 
Robert Drury 
J. H. Harvey 
Sr. Lennore 
Bro. DeSales, C. F. X. 
Robert L. Robertson 
Z. T. Lester 



Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
Robert Hamelton 
Charles Hume 
Bill Parrott 
Rev. H. L. Mitchell 
Bill Echard 
William Yankey 
Michael E. Speck 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



REGION 7 



D. 25 Central 
Flaget 
St. Xavier 

Shawnee 

D. 26 Assumption 
DeSales 
duPont Manual 
J. M. Atherton 
Male 

D. 27 Butler 
Durrett 
Fairdale 
Fern Creek 



Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 
Fairdale 
Fern Creek 



Pleasure Ridge Park Pleasure Ridge Park 

Southern Louisville 

Valley Valley Station 

D. 28 Catholic Ctry Day Louisville 

Eastern Middletown 

Ky. Military Inst. Lyndon 

Ky. School for Blind Louisville 

Lou. Country Day Louisville 

Seneca Louisville 

Trinity Louisville 

Waggener Louisville 



Atwood S. Wilson 
Bro. Aubin, C. F. X. 
Bro. Edward Daniel, 

C. F. X. 
Robert B. Clem 

Sr. Mary Prisca, RSM 
Rev. Rudolph Flanik 
A. J. Ries 
Russell Garth 
W. S. Milbum 

H. L. Hatfield 
James C. Bruce 
Harry K. Hardin 
W. K. Niman 
John H. Pollock 
T. T. Knight 
J. C. Cantrell 

Daniel M. O'Neill 

John W. Trapp 

N. C. Hodgin 

L. P. Howser 

Harry F. Ludwig 

K. B. Farmer 

Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 

Earl S. Duncan 



Edwai-d Q. Adams 
James Morris 
Gene Rhodes 

Jerome Keiffner 

Sr. Mary Rosalia 
James Swann 
James Casillo 
Fred Allen 
Guy Strong 

Lucian Moreman 
Donald Brooks 
Forest Able 
William Houchins 
Gerald Moreman 
William Kidd 
Garland GaiTison 

William Kleier 
William B. Hoke 
W. T. Simpson 

Debnar Wallace 
Bob Mulcahy 
Dave Kelly 
Roy Adams 



REGION 8 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
St. Aloysius 
St. Benedict 
Shepherdsville 

D. 30 Lincoln Institute 
Shelby County 
Shelbyville 
Taylorsville 

D. .31 Eminence 

Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Pleasure vi lie 
Trimble County 

D. 32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Lebanon Junction 
Shepherdsville 

Lincoln Ridge 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Tayloi-sville 

Eminence 
New Castle 
LaGrange 
Pleasureville 
Bedford 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Wilnamstown 



Samuel L. Smith 

C. L. Francis 
Sr. M. Franeelle 
Sr. Lucina Maria 
Willis G. Wells 

Whitney M. Young 
Bruce Sweeney 
Richard Greenwell 
Harvey G. Bush 

McCoy Tarry 

D. P. Parsley 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Robert Keen 
Clyde Cropper 

Palmore Lyles 
Alonzo Combs 
Ralph Blakey 
Cyrus E. Greene 
M. J. Belew 



Glenn B. Smith 
Lloyd Mullins 
Harold Dawson 
Rev. Roger Boehmicke 
Denzil Ramsey 

Alvin Hanley 
William HaiTell 
Evan Settle 
Bennie Mullins 

Jack Johnson 
John Bailey 
Bai-ney Thweatt 
R. B. Singleton 
Joe B. Arnett 

Shirley Keams 
Howard Alexander 
Steve Schuck 
William R. Smith 
Paul Watts 



REGION 9 



D. 33 Boone County 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon-Kenton 
Walton- Verona 



Florence 

S. Ft. Mitchell 

Erlanger 

Erl anger 

Independence 

Walton 



Chester Goodridge 
A. A. Hohnhorst 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Teresa, OSB 
George Edmondson 
William Doan 



Don Eddy 
Lewis Phillips 
A. W. Lancaster 
Martin Hils 
Robert Taylor 
Joe S. Reed 



T] 


HE KENTUCKY HIGH 


SCHOOL ATHLETE 


; FOR JANUARY, 1961 


I'age Seven 




School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 


34 Beechwood 


S. Ft. Mitchell 


Thebna W. Jones 


Harold Williams 




Covington Catholic 


Covington 


Bro. Donald Fahrig, S. M, 


. Robert Naber 




Holmes 


Covington 


H. B. Tudor 


Tom Ellis 




Holy Cross 


Latonia 


Sr. Clarita 


Richard Bezold 




Ludlow 


Ludlow 


Arthur T. Tipton 


Carl R. Wenderoth 




William Grant 


Covington 


Charles L. Lett 


James E. Brock 


D. 


35 Bellevue 


Bellevue 


Donald Davis 


Roy McKenney 




Dayton 


Dayton 


Dr. W. D. Sporing 


George Houston 




Newport 


Newport 


James L. Cobb 


Stanley Amzen 




Newport Catholic 


Newport 


Rev. John V. Hegenauer 


James Connor 


D. 


36 Campbell County 


Alexandria 


Edward E. Ball 


Lawrence Kinney 




Highlands 


Ft. Thomas 


Harold Miller 


Robert Luecke 




St. Mary 


Alexandria 


Sr. M. Carleta, SND 


Robert F. Gastright 




St. Thomas 


S. Ft. Thomas 


Sr. Elizabeth Marie 


Richard D. Hehman 




Silver Grove 


Silver Grove 


Tom L. Gabbard 
REGION 10 


Chas. F. Doll, Jr. 


D. 


37 Cynthiana 


Cynthiana 


Kelley B. Stanfield 


Bobby Whitaker 




Georgetown 


Georgetown 


William L. Mills 


Harry Graham 




Han-ison County 


Cynthiana 


Joe H. Anderson 


Charles J. Sutherland 




Scott County 


Georgetown 


Tony Raisor 


John Crigler 


D. 


38 Augusta 


Augusta 


Alice Kate Field 


Lou Cunningham 




Bracken County 


Brooksville 


Jarvis Parsley 


Jarvis Parsley 




Deming 


Mt. Olivet 


H. 0. Hale 


Jesse Amburgy 




Falmouth 


Falmouth 


C. A. Hellard 


Cecil Hellard 




Pendleton 


Falmouth 


Reedus Back 


Dwight Wolfe 


D. 


39 Fleming County 


Flemingsburg 


Martin Marlar 


Clay Evans 




Mason County 


Maysville 


Elza Whalen 


William Ryan 




MaysviUe 


Maysville 


Orville B. Hayes 


Woodrow Crum 




St. Patrick 


Maysville 


Sr. M. Celsus 


Francis Stahl 




Tollesboro 


Tollesboro 


Chrales M. Hughes 


Joe A. Simons 


D. 


40 Bourbon County 


Paris 


Joe E. Sabel 


Bobby Barlow 




Carlisle 


Carlisle 


Nancy E. Talbert 


Gayle Bowen 




Millersburg Mill. In. 


Millersburg 


Maj. F. H. Hall 


Capt. Al Pruitt 




Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


Charles Wilson 


Glenn Dorroh 




North Middletown 


North Middletown 


J. C. Falkenstine 


Fred Creasey 




Paris 


Paris 


Milton 0. Traylor 


Eugene Clark 




Paris Western 


Paris 


William B. Reed 
REGION 11 


William B. Reed 


D. 


41 Frankfort 


Frankfort 


F. D. Wilkinson 


John Lykins 




Franklin County 


Frankfort 


Ronald Connelly 


Charles Mrazovich 




Good Shepherd 


Frankfort 


St. Winifred Ann 


Charles Furr 




Midway 


Midway 


Marion Crowe 


Ed Allin 




Simmons 


Versailles 


Wm. J. Christy 


Charles J. Lee 




Versailles 


Versailles 


Charles 0. Dawson 


James McAfee 


D. 


42 Anderson 


Lawrenceburg 


James D. Boyd 


Jim Boyd 




Burgin 


Bui-gin 


Patrick E. Napier 


Robert J. Elder 




Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


William D. Smart 


Jim Mitchell 




Jessamine County 


Nicholasville 


Billy Lockridge 


William MaxweU 




Mercer County 


Harrodsburg 


Roy R. Camic 


Amos Black 




Rosenwald-Dunbar 


Nicholasville 


Ada Holloway 


Leonard J. Cavil 




Western 


R. 1, Sinai 


Robert B. Turner 


Robert Anderson 


D. 


43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


R. L. Grider 


Robert J. Abney 




Douglass 


Lexington 


Mrs. Theda VanLowe 


Charles H. Livisay 




Henry Clay 


Lexington 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Elmer Gilb 




Lafayette 


Lexington 


H. L. Davis 


Ralph Carlisle 




Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Fred O'Brien 



Page Eight 


THE KI 


:ntucky high school athl 


ETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


P. L. Guthrie 


S. T. Roach 


University 


Lexington 


James H. Powell 


Gene Huff 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mrs. Morris Todd 


H. Bruce Keel 


Estill County 


Irvine 


Luther Patrick 


Rodney Brewer 


Foundation 


Berea 


Roy N. Walters 


Douglas Massey 


Irvine 


Irvine 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


James B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


W. L. Holloway 
REGION 12 


Zeb Blankenship 


D. 45 Bate 


Danville 


William Summer 


Joe Gilliam 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


W. R. Duei-son 


William Butner 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Homer Proffitt 


Danville 


Danville 


Don R. Rawlings 


Alex Stevens 


Forkland 


R. 1, Gravel Switch 


Donald G. Lamb 


Gerald L. Sinclair 


Junction City 


Junction City 


Earl Cocanougher 


Fred Rice 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stanley Marsee 


Leslie Dyehouse 


Mason 


Lancaster 


Mrs. fommie F. Merritt 


Warren Wainwright 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Fay Ward Little 


Harold D. Murphy 


Parksville 


Parksville 


Joseph E. Wesley 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


Garland Purdom 


Larry Wooden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Broadhead 


D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


L. A. Wash 


H. Elliott 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Stanley E. Bryant 


Patric Tulley 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


G. W. Parks 


Charles Kavanaugh 


Livingston 


Livingston 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinney 


McKinney 


M. C. Montgomery 


Monty Singleton 


Memorial 


R. 1, Waynesburg 


Lester M. Mullins 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middlebm-g 


Middlebuig 


Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godby 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


Cleston Saylor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


Lee Thomas Mills 


Dale Moore 


D. 47 Bumside 


Bumside 


Hobart Thompson 


Oscar L. Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Lloyd Gooch 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


Howard Moore 


Herbert Childers 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Johnnie R. Laswell 


Joe Williams 


Monticello 


Monticello 


Vernon Miniard 


Joe Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


Garvis Burkett 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Clark Moi-ton 


Howard Jones 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


John H. Holbrook, Jr. 


Aubrey Johnson 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Murrell P. Stewart 


William F. Adams 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


Ed Tucker 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Ray Mills 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstadt 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Holbert Hodges 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Leighton Watkins 
REGION 13 


Gilbert Samples 


D. 49 AnnvUle Institute 


Annville 


Roland J. Simmelink 


JeiTy Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thui-man 


McKee 


McKee 


Walter H. Power 


Charles Norris 


Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


David C. Jackson 


David C. Jackson 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


Jack Powell 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


Charles Singleton 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


H. A. Howard 


Harry J. Taylor 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Harold Cole 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


P. M. Broughton 


Oscar Howard 


Pleasant View 


Pleasant View 


George E. Moses 


Clyde E. Hill 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH 


: SCHOOL ATHLE 


TE FOR JANUARY, 1961 


Page Nine 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


Poplar Creek 


Carpenter 


Wm. H. Ball 


Garrett Bennett 


Rockhold 


Rockhold 


Warren Peace 


Gray Broyles 


Rosenwald 


Barbourville 


Albert Gregory 


Albert Gregory 


St. Camillus Acad. 


Corbin 


Sr. Margaret Teresa 
C. D. P. 


Rev. Tyrrell Keller 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


H. B. Steely 


Alan LeForce 


Woodbine 


Woodbine 


Robert L. Jones, Jr. 


Malcolm Higgins 


D. .il Bell County 


Pineville 


James A. Pursifull 


Willie Hendrickson 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


Robert L. Hendrickson 


Wayland Jones 


Lincoln 


Middlesboro 


Miss E. R. Ball 


A. M. McKinney 


Lone Star 


Four Mile 


Chester L. Click 


G. B. Hendrickson 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


Shelvie Fuson 


Dan-ell Storm 


Pineville 


Pineville 


Effie Arnett 


Oi-ville Engle 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


P. P. Estridge 


Ted Curtis 


D. .52 Benham 


Benham 


C. E. Calloway 


Charles Davis 


Black Star 


Alva 


Nicholas Brewer 


James Burkhart 


Cumberland 


(Cumberland 


Kendall Boggs 


Fred Parsons 


East Benham 


Benham 


D. C. Taylor 


Rmirett Rroadus, Jr. 


East Main 


Lynch 


Ernest E. Smith 


Bill Bosch 


Evarls 


Evarts 


C. R. Dozier 


Chas. Hunter 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


Charles R. Steele 


Joe Campbell 


Harlan 


Harlan 


Roy G. Teague 


Dovle Troutman 


Loyall 


Loyall 


Lee P. Jones 


N.'Saylor 


Pine IVIountain 


Pine Mountain 


Gerna Campbell 


John Dee Wilson 


Rosenwald 


Harlan 


William M. Wood 


E. R. Gray 


Wallins 


Wallins Creek 


•Tohn Howard 


James L. Howard 


West Main 


Lynch 


John V. Coleman 
REGION 14 


Eugene Traylor 


D. .53 Dunham 


Jenkins 


G. V. Cun-y 


Robert B. Webb 


Fleming-Neon 


Fleming 


Roy T. Reasor 


Ralph Roberts 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Dave L. Craft 


James Summers 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 


I. L. Frazier 


Van V. Roark 


Letcher 


Letcher 


Jeff B. Mayes 


H. E. Wright 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


J. M. Burkich 


Donald Burton 


D. .54 Buckhom 


Buckhom 


Fred W. Johnson 


C. J. Dooley 


Dike Combs 


Jeff 


Homer Jones 


Albert Combs 


Hazard 


Hazard 


James Caudill 


Goebel Ritter 


Leatherwood 


Slemp 


Bingham Brashear 


Delano Combs 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


Roscoe Turner 


Lonnie Miller 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


Paul H. Colwell 


Pete Grigsby 


D. 55 Breathitt 


Jackson 


Millard Tolliver 


Fairce 0. Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


Hazard 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


Claude Frady 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


Orloff Lee Knarr 


J. B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


Edward Madden 


Edward Madden 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


Mrs. Hem-y A. Stovall 


Mancye Harmon 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


Elbert Hudson 


Harold Flynn 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


W. 0. Gabbard 


J. D. Scale 


Powell County 


Stanton 


Estil G. Chaney 


Wm. T. Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


A. M. Richie 
REGION 15 


Lando Lockard 


D. 57 Belfry 


Belfry 


W. F. Doane 


Jim Hutchins 


Dorton 


Dorton 


Charles Wright 


Monroe Hall 


Elkhorn City 


Elkhorn City 


James V. Powell 


Arthur Mullins 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


Nelson Hamilton, Jr. 


W. S. Risner 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


Hellier 


Hellier 


Scotty M. Sterling 


Jack T. Castle 


Johns Creek 


Pikeville 


Quentin R. Howard 


Donnie Layne 


Mullins 


R. 1, Pikeville 


Landon Hunt 


Gary D. Layne 


Phelps 


Phelps 


0. H. PhDlips 


Jack Cunningham 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


Charles E. Spears 


Richard Pi-ater 


Virgie 


Virgie 


Fred W. Cox 


Virgil Osborne 


D. 58 Auxier 


Auxier 


John C. Wells 


Jack F. Wells 


Betsy Layne 


Betsy Layne 


D. W. Howard 


Thomas Boyd 


Garrett 


Garrett 


Bumice Gearheart 


John Campbell, Jr. 


McDowell 


McDowell 


George L. Moore 


Estill Hall 


Martin 


Martin 


James W. Salisbury 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


Claude May 


Ray Heinisch 


Prestonsbuig 


Prestonsburg 


Woodrow Allen 


William Goebel, Jr. 


Wayland 


Wayland 


James V. Bolen 


Eugene Fi'asure 


Wheehvrig-ht 


WTieelwright 


Boone Hall 


Don Wahen 


D. 59 Blaine 


Blaine 


Paul H. Gambill 


Paul H. Gambill 


Flat Gap 


Flat Gap 


Virgil Porter 


Gail Gillem 


Inez 


Inez 


Russell Williamson 


U. G. Horn 


Louisa 


Louisa 


0. Paul Roaden 


Earl E. Jones 


Meade Memorial 


W'illiamsport 


Harold L. Pi-eston 


Howard W. Wallen 


Paintsville 


Paintsville 


Paul W. Trimble 


Billy Ray Cassady 


Van Lear 


Van Lear 


Hysell Burchett 


Howard Ramey 


Warfield 


Warfield 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Marcum 


D. 60 Ezel 


Ezel 


Wm. A. Heagen 


Henry E. Cochran 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


Ottis Mui-phy 


Neil Hunley 


Oil Springs 


Oil Springs 


Willis H. Conley 


Howard C. Yates 


Salyersville 


Salyersville 


Creed Amett 


Leonard Carpenter 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


Paul Polley 
REGION 16 


Len Stiner 


D. 61 Camargo 


R. 2, Mt. Sterling 


J. B. Cunningham 


Julian R. Cunningham 


Clark County 


Winchester 


Letcher Norton 


Letcher Norton 


DuBois 


Mt. Sterling 


Arthur Hawkins 


WiUiam Elster 


Montgomery County 


Mt. Sterling 


Calvin Hunt 


Robert Crawford 


Mt. Sterling 


Mt. Sterling 


Dawson Orman 


James Floyd 


St. Agatha Acad. 


Winchester 


Sr. Caroline Mary 


James H. Fanning 


D. 62 Breckinridge Tng. 


Morehead 


Hazel Whitaker 


John Allen 


Haldeman 


Haldeman 


James 0. Botts 


Jack Roberts 


Menifee 


Frenchburg 


Hiram C. Walters 


Harry Howard 


Owingsville 


Owingsville 


Edsel L. Karrick 


Donnie Gaunce 


Rowan County 


Morehead 


Russell Boyd 


Warren Cooper 


Sharpsburg 


Sharpsburg 


Glynn D. Baucom 


Jesse Mayabb 


D. 63 Carter 


Carter 


Thomas E. Phillips 


Baxter McGlone 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


Harold H. King 


Roy Murphy 


Laurel 


Camp Dix 


Wm. Alba Carver 


Paul Hamilton 


McKell 


South Shore 


Cliff Lowdenback 


Ed Moore 


Olive Hill 


Olive Hill 


Ollie D. Adams 


Jack Fultz 


Prichard 


Grayson 


Max E. Calhoun 


Harold Holbrook 


South Portsmouth 


South Portsmouth 


Foster Meade 


Jack Tackett 


VTjurg-Lewis Co. 


Vanceburg 


Teddy Applegate 


Howard Shumate 


D. 6i Ashland 


Ashland 


H. L. Ellis 


Robert Wright 


B. T. Washington 


Ashland 


C. B. Nuckolls 


W. A. West 


Boyd County 


Ashland 


Cobbie Lee 


Jim McKenzie 


Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


Frank C. Bums 


Harold Barker 


Fairview 


A.shland 


Webb Young 


Harold Tate 


Greenup 


Greenup 


Ann M. Sammons 


George Arrington 


Holy Family 


Ashland 


Sr. M. Barbara 


Jack Gossett 


Raceland 


Raceland 


H. R. Bowling 


Ronnie Potter 


Russell 


Ru.ssell 


Frank V. Firestine 


Marvin Meredith 


H'urtland 


Wurtland 


Stanley W. Ramey 


Charles Banks 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

Track provides fine competition. It gives a young 
man or a young woman an opportunity to compete vyith 
himself or herself as well as with teams. The Dutchman 
salutes the Kentuckiana Cinder Club for the lead that 
it has taken to elevate track to the level it rightfully 
deserves. George Gibson deserves a lion's share of the 
credit for the rejuvenation of this sport in Kentucky. 
George and his committee have been responsible for 
the construction of the largest indoor board track in the 
U. S. at Freedom Hall at the Kentucky State Fair- 
grounds. 

This track is an oval with eight laps to the mile, 
a sprint straight^away down the middle of one hundred 
yards, plus twenty yards for a start and a finish. 
Curved ends of the oval are banked with an outer edge 
two and one-half feet high at the highest point. It is a 
terrific accomplishment. 

High School athletic directors should support the 
first Mason-Dixon Games which will be presented on 
February 18, sponsored by the Kentuckiana Cinder 
Club and the University of Louisville. George Gibson 
sends word that the high school events vwU have the 
sanction of the K. H. S. A. A. The Dutchman is in- 
formed that Wilma Rudolph, winner of three gold 
Olympic medals at Rome, along with other famous 
track stars, will perform as added features. High 
School coaches interested in entering any of the events 
should write Wayne Cooper, Chairman of High School 
Events, Mason-Dixon Games, Freedom Hall, Louisville, 
Kentucky. 

Let's look at some of our mail to start the new 
year of 1961! From Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, comes 
a postcard saying that along with Charlie Fades he 
attended three basketball clinics, one at Bowling Green, 
another at Hopkinsville, and a third at Owensboro. 
Jerry goes on to say that he enjoyed each one of them. 
Who else did this? We want this information for the 
lecord. 

From Julian Pitzer, Sports Editor of the Daily 
News of Middlesboro, comes a letter recommending 
Gale Robbins of Bell County High School for the Game 
Guy Award of the year. Julian writes that in spite of 
an operation, which many predicted would prevent his 
ever playing football again, Gale overcame this handi- 
cap and amazed his doctors with his determination to 
once again compete on the gridiron. 

Coach Charlie Black, Barbourvillle, wrote a letter 
asking if it is legal for a basketball player to wear a 
football helmet to protect a facial injury. We ruled, as 
did Cliff Fagan, that football helmets have not been 
approved for wear for any purpose during basketball 
play. The uniform of a basketball player offers no 
protection from contact and the use of such equipment 
by an opponent could be dangerous. 

The mail from Danville contained a recommenda- 
tion of Coach Jim Morrison by Ken Snowden for the 
Flying Dutchman Award for January. Jim, who directs 
the athletic destinies of the Kentucky School for the 
Deaf, sets such a good example of sportsmanship and 
has been so outstanding in his treatment of officials 
that he is highly deserving of the Kentucky Thorough- 
bred with the little com cob pipe adorning his neck. 
Everybody in that section says that this chap is always 
pleasant, solicitous of the needs of officials, and gen- 
erally is the "Host with the Most." Ken further re- 
quests an Abou Ben Adhem citation for Memorial High 
School in Lincoln County for an outstanding effort to 
elevate good neighbor practice to a new high level in 
that community. 




Gale Kobbins 

Another letter which is anonymous says: "Send a 
razz-berry to a certain coach instead of a corn cob pipe 
for not staying on the bench during games." The Fly- 
ing Dutchman only compliments. If he can speak well 
of an individual, he speaks — otherwise, he holds his 
peace. Our philosophy is to point out the good that is 
in everybody. This letter recalls one received sometime 
ago saying, "Dutchman, you have sent a com cob pipe 
to the biggest louse in Kentucky." That may have been 
true but we just happened to know something good 
that this "louse" had done which transformed him into 
one of nature's noblemen. 

Times are changing! Sti'ange things are happen- 
ing. To wit: Joe Creasons Courier-Journal story of 
December 18 tells of a woman who has embarked on a 
basketball officiating career in Kentucky. Pretty Laura 
Lou Golden has been qualified by the K. H. S. A. A. as 
a "Whistler". Her husband, Billy Joe, who hails from 
Lynch, is one of the Dutchman's favorite arbiters. He 
is teaming vidth Laui'a Lou to fonn a husband-wife 
officiating team. I'll see you at those mountain clinics 
in October, Laura Lou. 

You just don't know who is an official anymore. 
The next time you stand on the comer of Fourth and 
Walnut Streets in Louisville and the traffic officer 
toots his whistle to cross the street, do so or he might 
call a technical on you. That officer is Hubert Loudon 
who is a "moonlighter" — a policeman by day, a basket- 
ball official by night. Wouldn't you feel strange if you 
booed an official and he locked you up for disturbing 
the peace? 

Anybody might be an official in these changing 
times. At the Bluegrass Tournament I watched a Ken- 
tucky State Senator do an outstanding job of officiat- 
ing. The "Whistler" was Senator George Conl'iy of 
Ashland. In 1963 we may see the Lieutenant Governor 
of the Commonwealth call the plays. It is no secr^it that 
the Senator from Ashland will make the race for that 
office. Why shouldn't the Lieutenant-Governor offici- 
ate ? Mayor Ralph Mussman of Newport is one of Ken- 
tucky's best referees. 

Incidentally, the Dutchman notes that both the 
officiating Mayor and the whistling senator have rapid- 
ly-expanding waistlines. They are getting "plumpy". 

So here is the Dutchman's closing thought — More 
people commit suicide with a fork than with any other 
weapon. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Oiiicial Dickinson Ratings For The 1960 Football Season 



CLASS A 

REGION 1 
Team W. 

Murray 4 

Western (Owensboi-ot 4 

Douglass (Murray) 4 

•Sturgis 2 

Lincoln (Paducah) 3 

Russellville 2 

Fulton 2 

Douglass (Henderson) 1 

Lincoln (Franklin) 1 

High Street 1 

Morganfield 1 

Attucks 

Providence 



REGION 
Team 

Fort Knox 5 

Lebanon 4 

Georgetown 5 

Harrodsburg 6 

•Bate 1 

Catholic Country Day 3 

Old Kentucky Home 5 

Campbellsville 3 

Shelbyville 3 

Bardstown 3 

Anderson 3 

Louisville 
Jassamine 
Versailles 
Metcalfe ' 

Frankfort 1 

Glasgow 1 



W. 



Country Day 2 

County 3 



unty 



ster 



Springfield 1 

Shepherdsvillc 

Stanford 

•Lincoln (Stanfordj 

•Gamaliel 

Note: Fort Knox is the winner due 

REGION 3 
Team W. 

Paint«ville 5 

Mt. Sterling 4 

Bellevue 3 

•M. M. I. 3 

Erlanger Lloyd 3 

Paris 3 

•Catlettsburg 2 

•Western (Paris) 1 

Cynthiana 2 

Ludlow 1 

Dayton 1 

•Beechwood 

•DuBois 

Carlisle 

•Kaceland 



Team 

East Main 
Benham ... 



Willia 
Londo 
Lynn 
Le»lic 



Camp 1 



13. Black Sta 



nty 



Loyall 

Wallins ... 

•Buckhorn 

•KIkhorn City 
•West Main S( 







Dickinson 


L. 


T. 


Rating 








25.00 





2 


23.75 


1 





21.25 




1 
1 

1 




1 
1 


20.00 
19.50 
19.37 
19.37 





3 


18.12 


3 

4 


1 


14.16 
12.50 


4 





12.00 


5 


1 


11.66 


° 





10.00 
Dickinson 


L. 


T. 


Rating 








25.00 








25.00 








22.50 


1 





21.25 








20.00 





1 


18.75 


2 





18.57 


2 





18.00 


2 





17.00 


3 


1 


15.714 


3 


1 


15.00 


2 





15.00 


3 





15.00 


4 


1 


13.571 


2 





13.333 


fi 





12.857 


3 


(1 


12.50 


3 


11 


12.60 


4 





12.00 


(1 





10.00 


5 





10.00 


1 


(1 


10.00 


1 





10.00 


ext 


a game played. 






Dickinson 


L. 


T. 


Rating 








25.00 


(1 





22.50 


1 





21.25 


(J 


(1 


20.00 


1 





18.75 


1 





18.75 


1 


(1 


18.33 


1 





15.00 


3 





14.00 


2 


1 


13.75 


3 


1 


13.00 


4 





12.00 


3 





10.00 


2 





10.00 


ft 





10.00 


2 





10.00 
Dickinson 


L. 


T. 


Rating 








22.60 


1 





21.50 



1 




20.00 
19.16 
18.00 


1 
2 




17.60 
17 50 


2 




17.50 


2 
3 
3 
3 
A 
3 




17.00 
16.66 
16.00 
14.00 
13.57 
13.00 


(i 




11.71 


3 




10.00 


1 




111.00 


1 





10.00 


ten 


ni3 «j 


d not i)lay 



CLASS AA 

REGION 1 
Team W. 

Paducah 4 

Mayfield 6 

Owensboro 3 

Madisonville 5 

Bowling Green 3 

Henderson Co. 4 

Henderson 3 

Caldwell Co. 3 

Franklin Simpson 2 

Hopkinsville 2 

Crittenden Co. 1 

Daviess Co 1 

Trigg Co. 

Owensboro Catholic 

*Warren Co. 

REGION 2 
Team W. 

Lafayette 7 

Madison Model 5 

•Dunbar (Lexington) 2 

Elizabethtown 3 

Henry Clay 4 

•LaRue Co. 1 

•Oldham Co. 1 

Somerset 2 

St. Joseph 1 

Bryan Station 1 



11. Danville 



13. 'K. M. I. 



Inst. 



W. 



•Lincol 

•Tompk: 

REGION 
Team 

Highlands 6 

Holmes 4 

•McKell 3 

Ashland 3 

Newport 4 



Bo 



Co. 



•Louisa 1 

Dixie Heights 2 

Russell 1 

•Wurtland 

Campbell Co. 

Newport Catholic 

REGION 4 
Team W. 

Hazard 7 

Pikeville 6 

Corbin 4 

Belfry 4 

Bell Co. 3 

Fleming Neon 6 

Prestonsburg 6 



tikins 
9. Cumberland 
9. Evarts 



3 



Central 1 

Middlesboro 1 

Napier 1 

•Hall 

•Hazel Green 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

CLASS AAA 

REGION 1 
Team W. 

Male 5 

Flaget 5 



Butler 6 

Durrett , 3 

Southern ^ 5 

Waggener ^ 4 

Seneca 2 

Fairdale 2 

Valley 1 

Pleasure Kidge 

four games required. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

25.00 
23.75 
21.87 
19.64 
18.00 
18.00 
16.66 
14.25 
14.16 
14.16 
12.50 
11.42 
11.00 
10.00 


Dickinson 
Rating 
26.00 
22.60 
20.00 
18.75 
18.33 
15.00 
15.00 
14.16 
13.76 
12.60 
12.00 
11.25 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 


Dickinson 
Rating 
27.50 
21.25 
20.00 
18.75 
18.33 
16.00 
13.75 
13.33 
12.60 
12 50 
10.00 
10.00 

Dickinson 
Rating 
27.50 
23.75 
22.50 
20.00 
18 76 
18.76 
18.57 
15.71 
15.00 
15.00 
13.33 
12.50 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



Dickinson 
Rating 

23.125 
23.126 
18.33 
17.50 
14.28 
14.00 
13.00 
12.00 
10.83 
Dickinson 
Rating 
30.00 
26.25 
21.00 
21.00 
19.376 
17.857 
13.333 
12.60 
11.11 
10.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Page Thirteen 



CORBIN— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




-4 -dC- 










(Left to Right) Front Row: John Rowlett, Jimmy Taylor, C. S. Fredericlt. Jesse Grant, E. R. Hopper, Ralph 
Hodge, Phil Henderlight, Arthur Morrison, O. B. Richardson. Second Row : Roger Ray, Jerry Stewart, Sammy Harrell, 
Johnny Scalf, Scottie Russell, Jce Gambrell. Barry Brooks, Roger Bird, Boyce Frederick. Third Row: Partin, Billy 
Jones, Larry New, Jimmy Walker, Gary Roadcn, Amon Root, Colmar McC'all. Russell Willis, Joe Burton. Fourth 
Row: David Burton, Kenny Cox, Howard Saylor, Charles Steinmetz, Collen Harrell, Ronnie Meadors, Chris Brasel, 
Gary Rose, Gary Frederick. 



All-Conference Teams 



Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Moore, Caverna; Bray, Hiseville. 

Guards: Gilpin, Cavema; Thompson, Temple Hill. 

Center: Steward, Temple Hill. 

Backs: Doyle and Rogers of Caverna; Depp, 
Temple Hill. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Branham, Austin-Tracy; Wells, Temple Hill. 

Guards: McCubbin, Caverna; Hogan, Austin-Tracy. 

Linebackers: Grider, Cavema; Morgan, Park City. 

Backs: Pendleton, Austin Tracy; Strader, Hiseville. 

Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Yankey, Glasscock and Reynolds of Perryville; 
Ledford, Bonny and West of Paint Lick; Stinson, Mar- 
tin and Roberts of Eminence; Deshon of Camp Dick 
Robinson; Walls and Matherly of Burgin; Finnell and 
Chamber of Berea; Thomason and Kendrick of Mt. 
Vernon. 

Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Chase, Frankfort; Maguire, Somerset; Mil- 
ler, M. M. I.; Tennill, Shelby ville. 

Tackles: Cormney, Madison-Model; Fawns, Mt. 
Sterling; Huddleston, Harrodsburg; Wilkins, George- 
town; McBride, Shelbyvillle. 

Gurads: Dean, Harrodsburg; Shuttleworth, Clai-k 
Co.; Tudor, Hem'y Clay; Withers, Versailles. 

Center; Shelton, Anderson. 

Backs: Brooks, Mt. Sterling; Todd and Ballou of 
Madison-Model; D. Gregory, Georgetown; Stauffer, 
Anderson; Yarber, Henry Clay; Burkhead, Harrods- 
burg; Robinson, Clark Co. 



Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: Howard, Black Star; Ellis, Evarts. 

Tackles: McGeorge, East Main; Evans, Evarts. 

Guards: Flanery, East Main; Messer, Benham. 

Center: Johnson, East Main. 

Backs: Johnson, Wallins; Goins, Evai'ts; Hoiska, 
East Main; Mays, Hall; Powell, East Main; Davis, 
Loyall. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Kestner, Belfry; Venters, Pikeville. 

Tackle: Stambaugh, Fleming-Neon; Elkins, Jenk- 
ins. 

Guards: Caudill, Hazard; Minix, Prestonsburg. 

Center: Cox, Hazard. 

Backs: Turpin, Hazard; Baird, Pikeville; Brewer, 
M. C. Napier; Bob Smith, Prestonsburg. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Garrett, Elizabethtown; Cronk, Ft. Knox. 

Tackles: Riggs, Elizabethtown; Rhule, Shepherds- 
ville. 

Guards: Edelen, Old Kentucky Home; Humble, 
Lebanon. 

Centers: Hayden, Bardstown; Herschede, St. 
Joseph. 

Backs: Jenkins and Miller of Elizabethtown; Hibbs 
and Gilpin of Old Kentucky Home. 

Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Sammons, Palmer, and Johnson of McKell; Well- 
man, Bryant and Estep of Louisa; Donovan and Gray 
of Catlettsburg; Bates, Russell; Hildebrandt, Wurt- 
land; Alfrey, Raceland. 
Defensive Team: 

Collier, Riggs and Vanover of McKell; Short, Hall 
and Rice of Louisa; Remmelle, Catlettsburg; Stephens 
and Slater of Russell; Bellew, Wurtland; Salyers, 
Raceland. 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



PERRYVILLE— BLUEGRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 







Sonny Smith. Jackie R. 

Bradley. Second Row : 

il. Robert Riley. Bobby 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Steinhauser and Ross of Highlands; Ovei'- 
man, Bellevue; Bird, Holmes. 

Tackles: Beiiy, Highlands; Moore, Dayton; Con- 
ner, Boone County; Young, Ludlo v. 

Guards: Barron, Holmes; Wray, Bellevue; Cecil, 
Boone County; Franzen, Newport. 

Centers: Bradford, Bellevue; Meadows, Boone Co. 

Backs: John Burt, Jim Buit, Walz and Ullman of 
Highlands; Garrison, Beechwood; Kyle, Lloyd; Hatte- 
berg, Newport; Creamer, Ludlow. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Hopper, Corbin; Newport, Harlan. 

Tackles: Allen, Central; Jones, Williamiburg. 

Guards: Grant, Corbin; Robbins, Bell. 

Center: Broughton, Pjneville. 

Backs: Miracle, Bell; Troutman, Knox Central; 
Bird, Corbin; Mize, Harlan. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Hopper, Corbin; Newport, Harlan. 

Tackles: Allen, Central; Smith, I'ineville. 

Guards: Grant, Corbin; Robbins, Hell. 

Backs: Buckner, Middlesboro; (awood, Harlan; 
Harp, Pintville, Brooks and Bird of Corbin. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Confertnce 

Ends: Wallaci.', Bowling Green; Hunt, Mayfield; 
Mallory, Caldwell Co.; Hill, Russellville; Lee, Murray. 

Tackles: Cheatham, Fulton; Graham, Trigg Coun- 
ty; Hardrick, Caldwell County; Mood;-, Franklin-Sin p- 
son. 

Guards: Cook, Crittenden Co.; Itandolph, Frank- 
lin-Simpson; Ballard, Mayfield; Perdue, Trigg County. 

Centers: Upton, Bowling Green; Johnson, Russell- 
ville. 

Halfbacks: Rose, Murray; Brown, Mayfield; Bag- 



by, Russellville; Moseley, Franklin-Simpson. 

Fullbacks: Lindsey, Bowling Green; Williams, 
Murray. 

Quarterbacks: Malone, Mayfield; Campbell, Bow- 
ling Green. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled Januai-y 1) 



telephone nun 
e phone numi 
are given, the 



r an official listed, it is 
-wise designated. If two 
that of the home phone. 

neville, ED 7-2764 



1449. 2386 
Henderson, VA 7-5466 



Anders, RaleiBh A., ^ 

Baird, Bill. Box 978, 

Baker, Rob.-rt M.. Jr.. 411 

Benson, Pascal Ray, 325 Glo 

Black. Clarince, West Liberty. SH 3-4264, SH 3-3405 

Boswell, Jack, 100 North 12th St., Murray, PL 3-2536, PL 3-2202 

Bowlin, Wesley, Box 104, Emlyn 

Boyd, Thorns s, Betsy Layne, GR 8-2362, OR 8-2256 

Browning, Earl E., 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville, TW 2-2937 

Brueck, Joe Calvin, Jr., 2012 Wyandotte Ave., Owensboro 

Buchanan, Divid R., Cecilia, TO 2-3321, RO 6-7303 

Bush, Oscar F., Harold. OR 8-6245. GR 8-2255 

Carrithers. Calvin "Bill", 1813 Millgate Rd., Anchorage, 

CH 5-006), CH 5-4161 
Gathers. Bob. P. O. Box 158. Corbin. 1338. 661 or 119B 
Chaney. Bobby Lee. 310 South 16th St.. Murray, PL 3-3896 
Clark, George Roger, Hulen, MO 4-3888 
Clusky, Joe, Matewan, W. Va. 

Combs, Travis, 1208 Old Cannons Ln., Louisville 
Cummins, Curtis, Hemlock, Box 92, Benham, 848-2546 
Cummins, Ray, Box H7, Benham, 848-2646 
Curnette, James R.. 2')1 8th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Deskins, Robert. Lenora, W. Va. 

Dickerson, William B., Beacon Hill Rd., Lexington, 2-4113 
Downard, Ronald E., 3)0-15th St.. Bowling Green. VI 3-9984 
Draud. Jon E. 2441 Alex. Park. Southgate, ST 1-2109 
Edwards. Owen. Box 263, Allensville, 438-4341 
Fairchild, Kenton, Room 303 Men's Hall, Box 603, MSC, 

Morehead 
f'catherstone. Jerry, 1624 Farmer Ave.. Murray. PL 3-1885 
Foster. J. W.. 821 Carneal Road, Lexington, 4-8068, 3-3336 

Ext. 6 
Frasure. Lois E., Box 224. Wayland, 2701 

Frazier. William Lynn. 1436 Center St., Catlettsburg. 739-6895 
Freeman. Jack M., Ilfl4-15th St., Huntington. W. Va. 



ilbert, Gordo 

TW 2-3678 

Grimes, Herman 1 

Hall, Douglas, Fr 

Hammond, Williai 



301 Brookv 



Hamilto 



Ohio 



102 South 14th St., Murray 
chburg, SO 8-3815 
105 Walnut St., Berea, 986-8876, 986-3361 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



Page Fifteen 



PAINT LICK— BLUEGRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




23G-6373, 236-3962 



Harris. Glenn, Jr., Box 323 College Station, Murray. PL 3-1391 

Hatfield, Cecil E. Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va. 

Henley, Jim L., College Station, Murray 

Hobbs, Charles V., 627 Westview Dr., Westwood, 324-9439, 

324-2175 
Ho'.brook. B. J., 313 Stockton Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-4802, 

RO 4-5151 
Horn, Dick. 112 Wilderness Rd.. Dai 
Huddleston, James E., Box 32, Loy; 
Hvde, Paul D.. 817 Tennessee. Paducah, 442-4638 
Jellison. Alvin C, M/Sgt., Hq. 2d AR Bn, 54th Inf., Fort Knox, 

4-6748, 4-4136 
Jude. Harold D.. Matewan, W. Va. 

Kukahiko. George E.. Jr., College Station, Box 80. Murray 
Leonhardt, Donald. Route 5, Box 347A. Evansville. Indiana, 

JN 7-5217, HA 5-2247 
McDowell. Glen D., 504 6th St., Pikeville, GE 7-4545 
Mays. Ralph J.. Barbourville. LI 6-3965 
Meeks. Jack, 4^7 5th St., Corbin, 415, 561 
Miller. Kenneth H., 4469 Gaffey Hts.. Fort Knox 
Miller. Tommy, Murray State College, Murray 
Minor, Edgar. Box 922 Ivy Hill, Harlan, 1243, 522 
Napier. Walter. Jr., Box 199, Lovall. 1906-W, 753 
Neal. James, 1222 G-rvin Ct., Owensboro. MU 4-2401 
Norvell, Glover H., Jr., 464 Carlisle, Lexington, 3-3462, 2-2626 
O'Nan. Harold L., 1927 Washington. Henderson. VA 6-4898 
Onpenheimer, E. William, 2818 Sunrise Ave., Portsmouth. Ohio. 

EL 3-1904, UL 8-6101 
Parsons, Clyde. 269 Lilleston Ave., Paris, 1400 (Bus.) 
Patterson, Jimmy, Hustonville, FI 6-2711 
Peay, Curtis E., Bowling Green, VI 3-8171, VI 3-8171 
Pence, Clyde, Route 2, Hazard 
Peters. Arthur. Keavy 

Potter. James E.. College Station, Box 859, Murray 
Preece, Boyce C, Box 544. Kermit, W. Va. 
Prichard, Glenn, Crum, W. Va. 

Quillen, John T., E. Main, Hazard, 6-4893, Hazard High 
Raisor, J. T., 990 Fredericksburg Rd., Lexington 
Rogers. Eugene. Jr., Box 105. Fredonia, 2671, Murray PL 3-4908 
Robinson, Don, 1906i/> Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Romans, Jerry, 355 N. 43rd St., Louisville, SP 8-2681 
Rudy, Harold Lewis, 226 N. Kentucky Ave.. Madisonville, 

TAylor 1-4122 
Scott, Bill, Box 1055, Lynch, 848-5484 
Sears, Wilson, 320 S. 3rd St., Richmond, 678-8705, 628 
Selvy. Curt. Route 2. Box 185, Corbin. 2422 
Swinford. John. 440 East Pike St., Cynthiana, 205, 1887 
Taylor. James R., 429 Robertson. Lexington. 4-7271 
Taylor, Jesse, Cumberland College. Williamsburg 
Trivette. Dale. Box 223. Virgie, 28 
Tucker, Roscoe, Jr., E-2 Batewood, Danville 
Vanover. Walter S.. 1907 Carol Dr., Evansville, Indiana 

OR 6-0670. 4-6481 Ext. 214 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route 1, Box 455. Pikeville, GE 7-4672 
Ward, Eddie D., 314 Bluebird, Frankfort. CA 3-1504, Peaks 

Mill School 
Whipple. Lloyd G.. 216 S. Frederick. Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-5809, HA 5-3137 
White. W. J.. Murray St. College, Box 580, Murray, PL 3-2588 
Williams, Donald, Box 25. Irvine, 723-2515 (Bus.) 
Williams, Joe W., U. S. 27, Box 37, Stearns, DR 6-2380, 

EL 4-2511 
Woodward, Billy, 17 Reynolds Village, Owensborg 



Minutes Of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the K. H. S. A. A. Build- 
ing, Lexington, on Thursday morning, December 22, 
1960. The meeting was called to order by President 
Louis Litchfield at 9:30, with Board members W. H. 
Crowdus, K. G. Gillaspie, W. B. Jones, Oran C. Teater, 
and Cecil A. Thornton; Commissioner Theo. A. San- 
ford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. 

The Commissioner read the minutes of the October 
22nd meeting. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the minutes be accepted as read. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the football 
championships had been very successful, with ticket 
sales at the Class A and Class AA final games amount- 
ing to $8,307.50, and program profits bringing the total 
receipts up to approximately $8,800.00. Expenses will 
be approximately $4,000.00. He also presented financial 
reports filed with his office by the managers of the 
first round games, which showed the following: Lafay- 
ette-Paducah, $335.80 profit; Hazard-Highlands, $1,- 
439.40 profit; East Main-Paintsville, $549.30 profit; Ft. 
Knox-Murray $231.64 loss. He stated that, in line with 
Board policy and with the approval of President Litch- 
field and the members of the football championship 
committee, he had mailed a check to Prin. S. M. Mata- 
razzo of the Ft. Knox High School, in the amount of 
the deficit mentioned. 

The Commissioner stated that he and Mr. Mans- 
field had studied by grades the 1959-60 enrollments of 
the schools maintaining football teams, and that they 
had the following recommendations to make concern- 
ing changes in football championship regulations for 
the next two years: 

a-Class AA teams shall be schools with an enroll- 
ment of 315 or more in grades 10-12, based on 1959-60 
enrollment records; and Class A shall be those with 
an enrollment of less than 315 in grades 10-12. 

b-The Pikeville High School and the Elkhorn City 
High School shall be moved to Region 3, Class A. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1961 



c-The semi-final sites shall be determined by the 
regional winners, but the present plan shall be changed 
to an alternating plan which would provide that first 
round Class A and Class AA games would not be 
played in the same numbered region any year. The 
alteiTiatng plan starting in 1961 shall be determined 
by lot. 

d-The Class AAA final game shall be played on 
the weekend prior to Thanksgiving. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the football championship regulations, as recom- 
mendated by the Commissioner and the Assistant 
Commissioner, be accepted and put into effect. The 
motion was cairied unanimously. 

The Commissioner recommendated that the 1961 
regulations in swimming be the same as the 1960 
regulations, with the swimming committee being given 
authority to make any necessary adjustments in the 
classes and events. W. B. .Jones moved, seconded by 
Gran C. Teater, that the recommendation of the Com- 
missioner be accepted and adopted. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that the Board of Con- 
trol had been asked to mle on the athletic program of 
the Madison Hieh School and Model High School for 
the year 1961 -6"2. the nue^tion being whether or not 
the Madison-Model High School, cuiTently a member 
of the K. H. S. A. A., is in reality t\vo schools, each 
eligible for membershin in the Kentucky High School 
Athletic A^<sociation. There was a general discussion 
of the present arransrement, which was approved by 
the Boavd of Control some twenty years ago. The 
Commissioner stated that, after studying the present 
aiTangement of the Madison-Model High School, he 
believed that it was perhaps somewhat different from 
that approved by the Board of Control originally; that 
it was his considered oninion that the Madison High 
School and the Model Hiirh School were each eligible 
for membership in the K. H. S. A. A.; and that he had 
notified by telephone the principals of the two schools 
involved that he would recommend to the Bo^rd of 
Control that each school be considered eligible for 
K. H. S. A. A. membershin, beginning in the fall of 
1961. The Commissioner stated that he had advised each 
pinncinal that the Board would be in session on Decem- 
ber 22, and that he was sure that the members of the 
Board would b? glad to have these men appear before 
the Board if thev desire to do so. The Commissioner 
then recommended to the Board that, at thp beginning 
of the 1961-62 school year, the Madison High School 
and the Model High School each be considered eligible 
for membership in the K. H. S. A. A. K. G. Gillaspie 
moved, seconded by Gran C. Teater, that the recom- 
mendation of the Commissioner be approved and adopt- 
ed. The motion earned unanimously. 

W. B. .Jones moved, .seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the next meeting of the Board of Control be held 
in Louisville on January 28, 1961. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones, chairman of the tronhy committee, 
reported that his committee had onened the basketball 
tournament trophy bids, the only two bidders being the 
Sutcliffe Company and the Hunt's Athletic Goods 
Company. Mr. Jones stated that the Sutcliffe bid was 
.$.38.00 per set of regional trophies and S29.80 per set of 
district trophies, the total amount of the bid being 
.$2,51.5.20 plus 3'/ sales tax; and that the Hunt's bid 
was $42.57 per set of regional trophies and $36.19 per 
set of district trophies, less a 2% discount, making a 



net total of $2,937.34 for the complete order. Mr. Jones 

stated that the Trophy Committee recommended that 
the Board accept the Sutcliffe bid as being the lowest 
and best bid. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the recommendation of the Trophy Com- 
mittee be accepted. The motion was carried unanimous- 
ly- 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, that all bills of the Association for the period be- 
ginning October ?2, I960, and ending December 21, 
1960. b? allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 

BASKETBALL RULINGS 

(Continued from December Issue) 

Sn. Plav: Foui-th nnai-tpr time-out is e-ranted team 
A. piav is resnmpd, following whipVi a floor violation 
is called on R1 . Th° .*>'"orpr notifies Referee that the 
time-nut called by A was its sixth. 

Pul'nir: Tpam R is ffi^'on a free throw for the 
technical foul bv A. Then ball is nut in nlav bv team 
A at out of bounds spot nearest the violation by B. (10- 
7-Note) 

36. Play: Al catches the ball while both feet are 
n^'f tVip flo"'- and ^f aro-lits with both fept touchino- the 
floor s'"inltanPonslv. He then iumns in thp air (both 
feet off the floor) and comes down ao-ain. before pass- 
ing or throwine for p-oal, with both feet touching the 
floor simultaneously. He does not step or pivot. 

J^ul'ng: Violation. (4-17) 

37. Plav: Al and Bl commit a false double foul 
and it is the fifth for Al. Al attpmnts his free throw 
f'r«t, after which: (a) it is im'nediately discovered that 
Al has been disouahfied; or (b) Bl attempts his free 
throw and then the discovery of Al's disqualification is 
made. 

Puling: Note following Rule 10-7 annlies. In (a), 
free-throw attemnt bv Al is cancelpd and the nlayer 
who replaces Al is given a free throw. Tn (b) it is 
ton late for coiTPct-ion and Al's successful attempt is 
allowed. Al is replaced immediately. (10-7-Note) 

3S. Plav: Aftpr Official has nlaced ball at dis- 
posal of Al for a free-throw reRuHine from a technical 
foul: (a) B2 pushes A2; or (b) A2 shoves B2. 

Rnline: Tn both (a) and 'bt the fnuls which are 
com"iittpd after the ball is nlaced at the disnosal of 
Al for his free throw atten-'pt are persona] fouls be- 
cause thev are contact fouls dnrinT live ball. In (a), 
A 2 is awarded a free throw for personal foul by B2. 
Tf free throw by A2 is successful, it is nut in n'av by 
B anvwhere along the end line at A's basket. If free 
throw is misled and does not touch basket rine. ball 
is nut in nlav bv R from out of hounds at sideline 
onnos'te A's free throw line. Tf free throw touches the 
basinet rmg hut is not succes.sful, ball re^^ains alive and 
is in nlav. Tn (b). B2 is awardpd a free throw for 
personal foul by A2 and the ball then is put in nlay by 
a iumn ba'l in the center circle between any two op- 
ponents. (6-1; 8-7) 

LITTLE THINGS 

Isn't it amazinK how a little drop of oil 

Makes the wheel run smoother, and lessens sweat and toil ? 
Isn't it ama-/.inK how a little drop of rain 
Lifts the drooping flower, so it will bloom n(?ain? 
Isn't it iima'/Ang how a kindly word of praise 
Cheers the heavy laden and helps the burden raise? 
—Rotary Revolutions 



OUR THANKS FOR YOUR 

CONFIDENCE AND 

COMPLIMENTARY REMARKS 

ABOUT OUR SERVICE. 

WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF OUR 1961-62 

COVERAGES. 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^Ite, K.in(fde4t QoHiftjOMif 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



1 



I 
I 
i 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Lexington, in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. XI OL Last Bilt ball made by MacGregor. 

Both of these balls will definitely he used in the State Tournament 

in Lexington. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2.,0€0 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission nrices and num^^ered consecutivelv. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of vour Sportsmanshin tronhies. individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tonrnnment teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and shin to von at on?e. 

A rrESSOPji^s 

Nets spore'^ooks first-aid sui^nlie«. whistles, stnnwatches. timers' horns, 
powdered resin, hafi^ towels, shoe laces, colored ton sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of thi=! merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a comnlete stock of f'^n-s^aned steel, fqn-s'^aned v/ood. and rect- 
angular glass backboards comrlete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have TN STOCK the Tick-A-Wav FF-iS Fair-Plav and the dial tvpe 
DeLuxe FD-60 Fair-Play in our warehouse ready for immediate shipment. 
A call will get them to your gymnasium before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be fflad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




We ShipTTib DaVYou BuV'/r 







t 





High khod Afhiefe 

Memorial Coliseum at the University of Kentucky 





^•:: 



\iri 



Pictured above is the Memorial Coliseum of the University of Kentucky, site of the 1961 State High 
School Basketball Tournament. Located on the Avenue of Champions between Lexington Avenue and 
Rose Street, the coliseum has a seating capacity of 11,400 for basketball games and 15,000 for pro- 
grams in which folding chairs may be placed on the playing floor. Seating space for approximately 
300 persons is provided alongside the 750 foot swimming pool. Names of more than 10,000 (Jold Star 
Kentuckians have been lettered on permanent plaques which occupy recessed wall panels in the coli- 
seum entry ramps. Special bronze stars commemorating each University of Kentucky student who 
died in World War II are located in the coliseum concourses. 




Offical Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
FEBRUARY - 19B1 



Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 









Dickinson 




Won 


Lost 


Tied Ratine 


Cavema 


10 


10 





Temple Hill 


8 


2 





Austin-Tracy 


5 


5 





Park City 


3 


7 





Gamaliel 


3 


7 





Hiseville 


1 


9 





Big 


Eight 


Conference 


Madisonville 


8 


1 


1 


Owensboro 


6 


2 


1 


Henderson County 


10 


1 





Henderson 


6 


3 





Daviess County 


3 


7 





Sturgis 


3 


7 





Mor^anfield 


1 


10 


1 


Bluegrass 


Eight-Man Conference 


Paint Lick 


7 


1 





Perryville 


7 


1 





Berea 


5 


3 





Eminence 


5 


3 





Burgin 


2 


6 





Mt. Vernon 


2 


6 





Camp Dick Robinson 


8 





Central Kentucky Conference 


Madison-Model 


9 








Georgetown 


8 


1 





Clark County 


8 


1 





Mt. Sterling 


9 


2 





Millersburg Mili. Inst. 4 


1 





Harrodsburg 


6 


2 





Paris 


6 


3 





Henry Clay 


3 


2 





Shelbyville 


4 


4 





Anderson County 


4 


4 


1 


Somerset 


2 


2 





Jessamine County 


3 


6 





Lancaster 


2 


6 





Versailles 


2 


6 


1 


Irvine 


2 


7 





Cynthiana 


2 


7 





DanviUe 


1 


4 





Carlisle 


1 


7 





Frankfort 


1 


8 





Stanford 





4 





Cumberland Valky Conference 


Evarts 


6 








East Main Street 


6 








Cumberland 


2 


2 


1 


Benham 


2 


3 





Loyall 


2 


3 





Wallins 


2 


4 


1 


Black Star 


1 


6 





Hall 


1 


6 





Eastern Kentucky 


Mountain 


Conference 


Hazard 


6 








Pikeville 


6 


1 





Fleming-Neon 


4 


2 





Belfry 


4 


2 





Prestonsburg 


4 


3 





M. C. Napier 


3 


3 





Jenkins 


3 


4 





Wheelwright 


1 


5 





^^Tiitesburg 


1 


6 





Elkhom City 





5 






Elizabethtown 


6 








26.00 


St. Joseph 


4 


1 





21.00 


Ft. Knox 


3 


1 





18.70 


Lebanon 


3 


2 





18.00 


Old Kentucky Home 


3 


3 





15.00 


Bardstown 


2 


4 





13.30 


Shepherdsville 





4 





10.00 


Springfield 





5 





10.00 


Northeastern Kentuck 


y At h let 


c Conference 


McKell 


5 










Louisa 


3 


1 


1 




Catlettsburg 


2 


2 


1 




Russell 


2 


2 


1 




Wurtland 


1 


3 


1 




Raceland 





6 







Northern Kentucky 


Athletic 


Conference 


Highlands 


7 








30.00 


Holmes 


4 


1 





26.50 


Bellevue 


7 


2 





24.00 


Newport 


4 


3 





19.29 


Boone County 


5 


4 





18.89 


Lloyd 


5 


2 





18.57 


Ludlow 


2 


3 


1 


14.17 


Dixie Heights 


2 


6 





12.50 


Dayton 


2 


6 


1 


12.78 


Beechwood 


1 


3 





12.50 


Campbell County 





9 





10.00 


Southeastern 


Kentucky Conference 


Corbin 


6 








30.00 


Bell County 


() 


2 





21.25 


Knox Central 


6 


2 





18.75 


Middlesboro 


4 


3 





18.67 


Pineville 


3 


4 


2 


16.67 


Williamsburg 


4 


5 





17.22 


London 


2 


3 


1 


15.00 


Barbourville 


2 


4 


1 


15.00 


Lynn Camp 


2 


6 





13.13 


Harlan 


2 


4 





17.50 


Hazel Green 





4 





lli!5 


Western Kentucky 


Athletic 


Conl 


erence 


Bowling Green 


5 


1 





22.50 


Murray 


6 


1 





22.14 


Mayfield 


6 


2 





20.71 


Russellville 


5 


2 


1 


17.14 


Hopkins ville 


3 


3 


1 


16.43 


Fulton 


2 


2 


1 


16.00 


Caldwell County 


2 


2 


1 


15.00 


Franklin-Simpson 


1 


4 


1 


12.50 


Trigg County 


1 


5 


1 


12.14 


Providence 


1 


4 





12.00 


Crittenden County 


1 


4 





12.00 


Owensboro Catholic 





2 





10.00 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1961 



1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Committee and the 
executive officers of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations met at the Hamil- 
ton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, during the period of Jan- 
uary 2-5, 1961. The Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association was represented at the football meeting by 
Athletic Director Edgar McNabb, Beechwood High 
School football clinic director; and Principal Joe Ohr, 
Irvine High School, Secretary of the Kentucky Coaches 
Association. The K. H. S. A. A. was represented at the 
sessions for executive officers by Assistant Commis- 
sioner J. B. Mansfield. Meetings of the football rules 
committee were held on Tuesday morning, Tuesday 
afternoon, and Wednesday morning. Meetings of the 
executive officers were held on Wednesday afternoon, 
Wednesday evening, and Thursday morning. 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Fagan of the Na- 
tional Federation has summarized the most important 
rules modifications which received the approval of the 
football committee: The summary is as follows: 

CHECK-UP ON 1960 CODE: Approximately 20,000 
National Alliance Football questionnaires were dis- 
tributed by the National Federation, the National 
Junior College Athletic Association and the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Approximately 
9500 questionnaires were returned and tabulated. The 
response to the questionnaire this year was nearly 
2,000 greater than for any previous year. The pro- 
portionate vote in one group differed very little from 
a con-esponding vote in each of the other groups. This 
prevailed for the check-up on last season's rules as 
well as for possible revisions for the 1961 season. 

Questionnaire results which were received from all 
sections of the counti-y indicated a high degree of sat- 
isfaction with the changes which had been authorized 
for the 1960 season. The requirement that each player 
wear a face guaixl was endorsed by 98% of the re- 
turned questionnaires. 79% are satisfied that it is 
acceptable to block from the rear under specified con- 
ditions in the 8 by 4 yard rectangle. The provision that 
the clock be stopped for an Official's time-out when 
there is unusual delay in getting the ball ready-for- 
play was supported by a vote of 17 to 1. 6767 approved 
the note which recommends that a Captain's request 
for measurement be denied if it is obvious a 1st 
down has or has not been made. Only 6% opposed 
the levision which provided that a valid fair catch 
signal is the holding of one hand at arm's length above 
the head. 98% favored requiring the home team to 
have a competent chain crew available. The provision 
that enables only the player who signals to make a 
fair catch was endorsed by a vote of 30 to 1. The rule 
provision which permits ineligible pass receivers to 
advance beyond the scrimmage line as soon as the 
last forward pass leaves the Passer's hand was favored 
by 88% of those returning questionnaires. 

Part II of the questionnaire, which is based upon 
observation, revealed that 20% considered "Officials 

The questionnaire results indicated that the simplifi- 



other than Referee blowing whistle at the wrong time" 
a marked problem. 9% denoted that injuries resulting 
from blocking from the rear in close line play was of 
major concern. Approximately 1 return in 12 indicated 
that other than the receiver of the kick giving a fair 
catch signal, was a problem. 

Valuable reports made by chairmen of the various 
sub-committees provided information and material 
upon which the Rules Committe could base action. 
These reports were made by Lyle Quirm of the Equip- 
ment Committee, J. C. Harper of the Game Adminis- 
tration Committee, S. D. Jackson of the Research 
Committee and Webb Porter of the Statistical Com- 
mittee. Kermit Anderson of the Safety Committee 
presented several colored slides which showed the ef- 
fect of blows to the mouth and teeth when not pro- 
tected by a tooth protector. W. M. Runyon presented 
the official report of fatalities resulting from 1960 
interscholastic competition. Ed Reutinger addressed 
the group as a representative of the National Sport- 
ing Goods Manufacturers' Association and presented 
the representatives of the various companies to the 
Committee. Summaries of the reports made will be 
included in the complete minutes. Several carry-over 
problems and new studies were referred to standing 
sub-committees for fm-ther study and recommendation. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1961: Questionnaire re- 
turns indicated that 3,478 favored requiring each play- 
er to wear a dental guard. 5,504 were opposed. Returns 
also gave evidence that 3 to 1 were opposed to stopping 
a clock for an Official's time-out each time the chains 
were moved. Only 30% favored an Official's time-out 
whenever there was a change of team possession. Re- 
turns revealed opinion was nearly evenly divided re- 
garding the advisability of specifying that, beginning 
in a given year, all hard material in rib, shoulder and 
hip pads be covered with soft or shock-obsorbing ma- 
terial. 4745 favored the proposal while 4292 opposed 
it. 66% of the returns opposed removing the restric- 
tions which prohibit an interior lineman from moving 
after he has placed his hand on the ground. The re- 
commendation that there be a two-minute intennission 
between the 1st and 2nd and the 3rd and 4th quarters 
was opposed by 5607 and favored by 3712. A slight 
majority (56%) favored authorizing the Referee to 
make an equitable adjustment or to order a replay if 
the ball became dead because of an inadvertently blown 
whistle which obviously handicapped one of the teams. 
The vote indicated that 3 out of 4 favored the adoption 
of a provision which would require R to put the ball in 
play at the inbounds spot if R is the last to touch a 
free-kick which goes out-of bounds. 77% of the re- 
turned questionnaires opposed considering all blocking 
from the rear, including that during close line play 
in the 8 by 4 yard rectangle along the scrimmage line, 
a foul. 73% favored permitting a fifth charged time- 
out per half in games played in 15- minute quarters. 
5029 favored starting the clock when the receiver 
touches a free-kick. 4124 were opposed to this pro- 



( Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 19(31 



FEBRUARY, 1961 VOL. XXIU— NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, L€.xington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexingrton, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Vice-President. W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus 11958-62), Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-62), Loiisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. i.illaspie (1959-63), Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-64), Pa ntsville : Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jtrom the Commissionei s Cjffice 

1961 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Hickman County, (2) Reidland, (3) 
Symsonia, (4) Murray College, (5) Critten- 
den Countv, (6) Madisomille, (7) Christian 
County, (8) Todd County, (9) Providence, 

(10) Henderson, (11) Sacramento, (12) 
Owensboro, (13) Meade County, (14) Butler 
County, (15) Beaver Dam, (16) Muhlenberg 
Central, (17) Bowling Green, (18) Olmstead, 
(19) Park Citv, (20) Metcalfe Countv, (21) 
Campbellsville, (22) LaRue County, (23) 
Elizalethtown, (24) Bardstown, (25) Cen- 
tral, (26) DeSales, (27) Fern Creek, (28) 
Ea.steni, (29) Shepherdsville, (30) Shelbv 
County, (31) Oldham County, (32) Owen 
County, (33) Boone County, (34) Covington 
Catholic, (35) Newport, (36) Highlands, (37) 
GeorgetovTO, (38) Bracken County, (39) 
May.sville, (40) Paris, (41) Frankfort, (42) 
Jessamine County, (43) University, (44) 
Madison Central, (45) Danville, (46) Memor- 
ial, (47) Somerset, (48) London, (49) Mc- 
Kee, (50) Williamsburg, (51) Pineville, (52) 
Evarts, (53) Kingdom Come, (54) Hazard, 
(55) Jackson, (56) Wolfe Countv, (57) Feds 
Creek, (58) Wheelwright, (59) Paintsville, 
(60) Morgan County, (61) St. Agatha Acad- 
emy, (62) Breckinridge Training, (63) Prich- 
ard, (64) B. T. Washington. 

1961 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State College, (2) Caldwell 
County High School, (3) Henderson High 
School, (4) Beaver Dam High School, (5) 
Bowling Green High School, (6) LaRue Co- 
unty High School, (7) Louisville, (8) Shelby 
County High School, (9) Boone County High 
School, (10) Harrison County High School, 

(11) U. K. Coli.seum, (12) Somer.set High 
School, (13) Bell County High School, (14) 
Hazard High School, (15) Pre.stonsburg High 
School, (16) Morehead State College. 



"Certified" Official 

Since the list of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine, 
one additional official has qualified for this 
rating. He is Billy W. Omer. 



News About Swimming 

The 1961 State High School Swimming 
Meet for Class A will be held in Lexington 
on Saturday, February 25, at the University 
of Kentucky pool. The meet for Class B will 
be held at the same location on Saturday, 
April 1. 

Class A will include those high schools 
with an enrollment of 750 or more (grades 9- 
12, and Class B will include those schools 
v.ith an enrollment of less than 750. Any 
school may enter a class above its classifi- 
cation. 

Class A will have eleven events this year, 
Class B eight. Individual contestants may 
enter only two events, including Fancy Div- 
ing. 

The Class A events are as follows: 400 
Yard Freestvle, 50 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard 
Butterfly, 200 Yard Freestyle. 100 Yard 
Backstroke, 100 Yard Breaststroke, 100 Yard 
Freestyle. Fancy Diving, 200 Yard Individual 
Medlev, 20O Yard Medley Relay, and 200 
Yard Freestyle Relay. 

The Class B events are: 50 Yard Free- 
style, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard 
Breaststroke, 100 Yard Freestyle, Fancy 
Diving, 200 Yard Individual Medley, 200 
Medley Relay, and 200 Yard Freestyle Relay 

Cla.'^s B Diving will be arranged so that the 
contestants have to perform no more than 
seven dives (providing they qualify for the 
finals). There will be four preliminary dives 
(No. 100, No. 200, No. 400, and No. 510, all 
required) in the morning session. The three 
remaining dives will be in the afternoon, all 
optional. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals, as in is given State Track Meet parti- 
cipants in each event. Expenses for the 
swimming coach will be paid if the school 
has as many as four entries in the State 
Meet. 



Attention, Principals! 

Attention is called to the provisions of 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21, Number of Basket- 
ball Games. The last sentence of this By- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 



Page Three 



Law reads: "In one county, conference, or 
invitational tournament, the games played 
bv a member school shall count as one 
game." 

The Commissioner has been advised that 
there is a possibility that many principals 
are not complying with K.H.S.A.A. regula- 
tions with respect to exchanging eligibility 
lists when second teams are involved. Under 
the "ByLaws" heading in the K.H.S.A.A. 
booklet' is the following: "Governing All 
Contests Between Teams Representing Mem- 
ber Schools." 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICL\LS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home uhone number unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Rabbage, Don R., 11000 Grafton Hall, Valley Station, WE 7-5977 

Bush, Oscar F., Harold, GR 8-6245, GR 8-225 

Damico Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, Ohio, WO 

1-5756. DU 1-2200 Ext. 370 
Dawson. Ray R.. Stearns 
England, James, Shelbiana, GE 7-78515 
Goodin, Charles L., 215 Summit Dr., Pineville. ED 7-23b5, 

ED 7-2151 
Hughes, Charles, Wayland, 4881 

Karnavas, George T., 1704 Ryan Ave., Murray, PL 3-4602 
Shupert, John W., 1360 11th St., West Portsmouth, Ohio, 

UL 8-6572 
Slack, Earl H., 4630 Hillside Dr., Shively, EM 6-8793, EM 8-1611 
Thompson, Thomas A., 3435 Greentree Rd., Lexington, 6-8921 
Webster, Paul L.. 302 Delaware St., Ironton, Ohio 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS 
Willett. Arthur "Bud", 109 South 4th Street, Bardstown, 
3':8-6515, 348-9950 

CORRECTIONS 

1960-61 BASKETBALL RULES PUBLICATIONS 
RULES BOOK: 

1. Rule 10-A-4a: Delete word "personal", second 
line, top of page 25. Rule now applies to all fouls. 

2. Comments, page 29, under Held Ball: In third 
and fifth lines of second paragraph, delete "obvious." 
In second sentence of third paragraph, delete "obvious- 
ly." 

CASE BOOK: 

1. P. S. 307: First sentence of ruling should read 
"It is legal for A2 to return to the game in place of 
Al and jump." 

2. P. S. 328: Last sentence of ruling should read 
"In (a), Al is permitted, etc." 

3. P. S. 360A: Seventh line of ruling should read 
"B's ball for throw-in at end line nearest B's basket." 

4. P. S. 367: Delete item 1 from list. 

5. P. S. 513: Statement for (b) should read," . . . 
and discovery of irregularity is during the next dead 
ball ..." 

PLAYER HANDBOOK: 

1. First paragraph, top of page 3: Second sen- 
tence should read "To illustrate, the touching of the 
ball by a member of the free throwing team on a free 
throw in flight, etc." 

2. III. Questions with Odd Twists, page 29: 3. 
Throw-in is by A in both cases. 5. Third question under 
(a): Since the touching is by A2, no point is scored," 
hence, none can be credited. 

3. IV. Situation with an Odd Twist, page 31: In 
3, correct answers are: No, Yes, B, Yes, No. 

4. Play 37, page 38: No free throws — double 
foul situatian. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Saturday morning, January 28, 1961. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President Louis Litchfield 
at 9:15, with Directors W. H. Crowdus, Jack Dawson, 
K. G. Gillaspie, Oran C. Teater, Cecil A. Thornton; 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that the reading of the minutes of the December 
22nd meeting be waived, since the members of the 
Board had received copies of these minutes. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that preliminary plans 
for the forthcoming State High School Basketball 
Tournament were being made, with no particular prob- 
lems being involved. Assistant Commissioner Mansfield 
reported that the advance sales of tournament tickets 
were probably greater than ever before at this time. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the following regulation concerning fees for re- 
gional tournament officials be adopted: The official 
shall receive a fee of $20.00 per game and a transpor- 
tation allowance of seven cents per mile for all necess- 
ary travel, in the event it is necessary for the official 
to remain overnight at the tournament site, he shall be 
paid an additional $10.00 per day for lodging and 
meals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the 1961 State Track Meet be held in Lexington 
on May 19-20, and that the Commissioner be authorized 
to set the dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that inquiries had been 
received from certain football school representatives of 
Class AA, Region 4, and Class AAA, Region 2, con- 
cerning the possibility of determining two district win- 
ners in each of the regions involved, these winners to 
play for the regional championships on the week end 
prior to the semi-final championship games. Cecil A. 
Thornton moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, that the 
Commissioner be directed to send out a questionnaire 
to the school principals involved, for the purpose of 
determining whether or not football districts should be 
set up on an experimental basis in 1961 in the regions 
mentioned by the Commissioner. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion concerning the possible 
sanction of certain all-star games by the Board of Con- 
trol, since such sanction is now apparently necessary 
under new N. C. A. A. regulations. No action was taken 
by the Board on sanction requests which had been 
received, since all members of the Board were not 
present at this meeting and since it was known that 
certain other requests would also probably be received. 
The Commissioner reported that, in answer to an 
inquiry. Miss Robye Anderson of the Bowling Green 
High School, committee chairman for the Kentucky 
Division of Girls' and Women's Golf, had stated that 
her organization was interested in exploring the possi- 
bUites of a State Golf Tournament for girls, to be held 
in 1962. 

The Commissioner reported that ties in the balloting 
had occurred in basketball districts 5, 35, and 48; and 
that he and President Litchfield, following a policy of 
many years standing, had broken the ties. The recom- 
mended hosts for the three districts mentioned were 
respectively Crittenden County High School, Newport 
High School, and London High School. W. H. Crowdus 
(OoirtbnMd on Page Nme) 



Page Foui' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

About ten years ago a grand guy from 
Hazard, deep in the Kentucky mountains, 
hung up his whistle and pointed the nose of 
his worn-out automobile toward Maryland to 
become the state manager for a large in- 
surance company there. That chap was Lus 
Oxley, who had written outstanding hai-d- 
wood history as a basketball official. 

Just before Christmas my telephone rang 
and a voice I had not heard in a decade said, 
"Dutchman, I'm back." It was Lus. Lus had 
set the "woods on fire" in Maryland and has 
now been sent home to ignite a few brush 
fires in this area for his company. "The 
WTiistler" left Kentucky a poor boy. Now, he 
is living in "Rich Man's Subdivision" in 
Louisville with Ben Edelen, Johnnie Carrico 
and the other "well-heeled" tycoons who 
started with whistles. 

Kentucky is happy because of the return 
of Lus but all of us hated to get word that 
Johnny Crosthwaite is leaving Kentucky to 
set up shop in St. Petersburg, Florida. Here's 
another great guy who has long been "Tops" 
as a sports official. And, he is another moun- 
taineer hailing from Harlan. John ran the 
Schools for Officials for the Dutchman in his 
region for several years. He makes friends 
as fast as Lus Oxley and Tater Combs make 
money. 

Kentucky will miss Johnny Crosthwaite 
but Johnny will also miss his many friends 
of the Commonwealth. In his letter Johnny 
sHys, "Please say goodbye to my many 
friends in Kentucky through your column 
in the Athlete. When the snow is knee-deep 
in January and February, pay me a visit and 
we'll knock the little white ball around." 

0. K., John! The Dutchman is taking you 
up on that invitation. Is it all right to bring 
my golfing skeptics, Bill Nau, Briscoe Inman 
?nd Harry Stephen.son along? Come back in 
1970 the way Lus did in 1960 — in a shiny 
new road wagon. 

While we are talking about "Nature's 
Noblemen," let's include Louisville's George 
Lewis who was awarded the Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor for the month of January on 
WAVE Television by Ed Kallay, Sports Di- 
rector for the station. Every kid in the Falls 
Cities area has reason to know and love 
George. This lovable Kentucky character, 
who is now on the wrong side of fifty, has 
devoted most of those years to the promotion 
of wholesome sports for youngsters. His 
work with boxing and "Champions of Tomor- 
row" qualifies him for sports immortality. 
They should have made mon; like George 




Johnny Crosthwaite 

Lewis before they threw the mold away. 

Rules - Rules - Rules ! Everybody talked 
rules during the past month with the dis- 
cussions disclosing that sports writers, an- 
nouncers, the public and even some officials 
are thoroughly confused. The Dutchman 
suggests the following New Year's resolu- 
tion for the National Basketball Rules Com- 
mittee: 

(1) Eliminate as much technicality as 
possible. Example : Goal Tending 
versus basket interference. 

(2) Delete rules which are impossible to 
enforce with consistent fairness. Ex- 
ample: Technical four for coaching 
from sideline. 

(3) Rewrite the entire rule book, if nec- 
essary, to uncomplicate it. 

Over one hundred letters and calls to ex- 
plain the difference between goal tending 
and basket interference have ijeen received. 
We explained it on radio, television and in 
Earl Ruby's Report — Now here is the ex- 
planation for the >^thlete! 

Goal Tending: May occur during a try for 
field goal only while the ball is in do\^nward 
flight and is entirely above basket level. 
Once the ball touches the basket ring or the 
basket cylinder, it can no longer be goal tend- 
ing. Any infraction after such touching is 
basket interference. 

Basket Interference: May occur during a 
try for field TOal or foul goal. This means 
that if the ball is touched while it is on the 
basket ring or in the cylinder during either 
of these tries, basket interference and not 
goal tending takes place. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



Page Five 



Jack Thompson had a "doozey" to call 
which decided a Christmas tournament 
championship. As usual the "Indefatigable 
One" ruled correctly. Look the situation 
over: A foul was called. Jack got the boys 
lined up properly on the foul lanes and hand- 
ed the ball to the free-thrower. After the 
ball was at the free-thrower's disposal, an 
opponent decided to walk across the lane and 
line up on the opposite lane. As soon as his 
foot crossed the plane of the foul lane line, 
the boy violated. If "Fate" had been kind, it 
could have saved Referee Jack a tough call 
by allowing the shooter to make his try so 
Jack could have disregarded the violation — 
but the shooter missed and got a substitute 
throw which he made and that vi^on the 
championsihip. You know something — It's 
worth more money than is buried in Fort 
Knox to officiate some games. 

With the big tournaments in the offing, 
here is a thought for the boys: A winner 
never quits and a quitter never wins. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the De- 
partment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
sperial sybscripticn service plans, offered bv the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Materials. 

Swimming 

AQUATIC ARTISTRY, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving exhibition by Harold 
Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion photog- 
raphy brings out clearly various points in Smith's 
techniques. 
BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and be- 
neath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm are 
practiced separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back stroke, 
and breast stoke are also illustrated and explained. 
BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, reel, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in 
this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breath- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: The 
hurdle jump, determining the con-ect distance, proper 
arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, proper 
takeoff and lift, correct entry into the water. The 
backward dive is also taught, including lift, arching 
the body, and entry into the water. The motion is 
stopped at various points to enable detailed study of 
form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 



carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming technique known as the dolphin 
or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body movements used 
in the dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance 
of practice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick. 
1955 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL, A. A. SWIM- 
MING MEET, j-s-c-a, 2 reel, silent, $.75 
Highlights of the meet and championship heats are 
shown in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won the 
Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. University 
High of Lexington won the Class B and Bellevue the 
Class C. 

SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Forces at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burning 
oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruction 
and for safety classes as well as for general programs. 

Track 
The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination — develop- 
ment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and hips, 
one, two, three style — foot roll — single and triple air 
stride — soft versus hard take off — arm position. 
Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle development 
for side arm throw — grips — finger roll — heel of thumb 
pressure — finger exercises — clockwise spin — hip snap 
— reverse and non-reverse styles. 
Distance Races, s-e, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance rimner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Difference in typical 
physiques are shown. Slow motion photography is used 
to analyze movements. 
Distance, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex 
— straight line i-unning — antomatic stride. 
The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of ai-m and leg action. 
The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling, calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 
The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — body and leg coordination drills 
— flexibility exercises. 
Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jump; running broad-jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography 
is used for detailed study of form. 
1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, j-s-c-a, 
4 reels, silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
shown as Ashland High School won the meet with 26 
points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was second 
with 2014 points. New records were set in the Mile 
Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 
Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise^— 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 




OWENSBORO — BIG EIGHT CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 

undiff. Mitchell. Williams, ((uisenberr.v. Taylor. Nash. Meschko. Whit- 
ard. Ass't foach Organ. Berry. Nash, Mayes, Barr. Woodward, Long, 
man. Head Coach Genito. Third Row: Moore, Taylor, Milan, Garner, 
bott. Hofendorfer. Fourth Row: Frakes, Evans, Ballard. Likens, 



(Left to Right 1 Fro 


nt Row: Havener. E 


ton, Haas, Baling. Sec 


ond Row: Ass*t Coac 


Fisher. Shake. Watki 


is. Levitch. Carpent 


.\rnold. Patterson. Ke 


inedv. Brown, Stinne 


Kaplan. Chambers. Te 


ndv. Harralled. Jac 



counter balanced arm action — push drive— jockeying 

for position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises — 
running action — grip — selecting the pole — take-off — 
Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice training, 
The Relays, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips — 
relay starts, underhand action — cup style — overhand 
sprint pass — fly scoop — practice and team work. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reel, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash- 
impact style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing 
leg and arm action-conditioning exercises-starting 
techniques-slow motion of muscular utilization and 
coordination, 
Shotput, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques-tension control-one, two, 
three rhythm-exercises-finger and hand grip-finger 
and wrist snap-foot positions-progressive tension and 
effort-explosive hip snap. 

Baseball 

Baseball All-Star Game of 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, 
$,75 

The A'.l-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Wa.shington, Stars of the American and 
National Lea'_'ue are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are showTi 
as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 
Baseball All-Star Game of 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, 
$,75 

Twenty-five all stars from the American League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-.3 at Baltimore, Close ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plays of the game are 
shown in the film. (KHSAA) 
Baseball By The Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This picture gives an official interpretation of the 
rule.s and a demonstration of game administration by 



Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagues, Play 
situations are demonstrated by high school, college, 
and professional players. Correct pitching procedure, 
interference and obstruction, live and dead ball, trap 
plays, infield fly, and strike zone are illustrated. 

Baseball Hall of Fame, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film shows the annual meeting at Cooperstown, 
New York, when new names are added to the Hall of 
Fame list. Numerous stars of the past return to the 
shrine each year at this time, and are shown as their 
feats on the diamond are related. The history of 
Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame are 
explained in the picture. 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-through are clearly 
demonstrated in this film by professional players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 

Catching In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. Slow 
motion and close-up photography are used to enable 
the viewer to follow each step or movement in each 
of the basic skills. 

Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching of 
catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throw- 
ing, signalling and fielding are illustrated by Bill 
Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy Camp- 
anella. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



Page Seven 




MADISONVILLE — BIG EIGHT CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPiON 

(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Welbom, Crabtrce, Butler. Maddox, Ferrell. VanClcve, Tucker, Walls, Sheme, 
Demko, Luckett. Wells, Teague, Coach Oaken, Coach George. Second Row: B. Welborn. Jr.. S. Wclborn. Martin. Poole. 
Lisanbv, Rucker. H. Siria. Space, Slatcn, Hawkins, Scott, Hale. B. Siria. Brown. Ashbv. Oldham, Mgr. Parker. Third 
Row: Croxton. Gipson, S. Playl, L. Phaup, Jameson, J. Phaup. Whitfield. Fo-.irtb Row: A. Plavl, Prow, Wakeland, 
Adams. Moore, Ashmore. Fifth Row: Daniels, Pearce, Ma.ves, Ligon, Ratliff, Milum, Pollock. 



Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for fm-ther development 
of young baseball players in our modern democracy 
and illustrates this through sports and sports com- 
petition. This film includes a brief history of baseball 
along with a cavalcade of past and present stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j— s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throvdng are illustrated and explained. 

Hitting In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
follow accurately and graphically the basic fundamen- 
tals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, legs, 
hips, shoulders, arms, and head is explained. How to 
select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting posi- 
tion are shown. 

Infield Play at 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third base are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, 
etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. 
G. Spalding Co., The American and National Leagues. 
Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fun.1amentals of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding and base-running, are demonstrated. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Hall High School for the 
championship by a score of 13-3. All the final game 
is shown in color. 

1956 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Group pictures and action shots of the eight teams 
in the tournament are shown in the film. Also included 
are the first innings of the semi-final games and four 
innings of the final game between Newport Catholic 
and Murray. 



1957 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, $.75 

diiPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for the 
championship by a score of 8-3. All of the final game 
is shown in color. 
Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 
of pitches and methods for practice are portrayed. 
Play Ball, Son, j-s, IV2 reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in baseball. 
Correct methods of hitting, catching, and throwing 
are demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based 
on book by Bert V. Dunne. 
Throwing in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing 
in baseball. Instructions are given for the over-head, 
three-quarter side, side, and imderhand throws. Co- 
ordination of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well 
as coordination of the body as a whole. 
Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremonies 
in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night 
baseball games. 
The Umpire In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire and 
also qualifications for job, showing where they re- 
ceiv€ their training. 
World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

Highlights of the games between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 19(J1 



The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 

World Series of 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
Brooklyn Dodgers and the New Y''ork Y'ankees are 
showTi in this film. The commentary leading up to each 
game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers win 
the world championship. 

World Series of 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League champion New York Yankees, 
carry the series the full seven games before bowing 
to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the National 
League. The film catches most of the hitting and 
shows the plays in which runs were scored in each 
game. The narrator. Lew Fonseca, describes the play 
and fills in the background with interesting bits of 
information concerning the game. 

World Series of 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

The highlights of the si.x games played in the series 
between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Cleveland 
Indians are shown in this film. Most of the scoring 
plays are fibned, along with many of the outstanding 
defensive plays. The color that goes with these games 
is captured in the film. 

Tennis 

.Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-e-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil, Bill Tilden 
nan-ates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Riggs is shown winning national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstrates how to make var- 
ious shots correctly — the grip, service, forehand drive, 
backhand, etc., using regular speed and slow motion. 

Golf 

Saving Strokes with Sam Snead, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to 
clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, brassie, and 
various irons for difficult lies are illustrated and finally 
his putting technique is shown. 

NATIONAL FEDERATION .MEETlNc; 

(Continued from Page One) 

cation and orderly arrangement of the rules in the 
National Alliance Code are continually becoming better 
understood and more appreciated. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

1-2-1: No lime nor caustic material of any kind may 
by used in marking the field. 

1-5-1: An addition to the present requirement that 
each player wear a face protector will be the recom- 
mendation that the protector be the mulitple bar type. 

The mouthpiece recommended for maximum pro- 
tection shall be the fitted flexible kind. 

1-5-1-Note: Effective in 1962, the wearing of a 
fitted flexible month and tooth protector will be manda- 
tory. 



2-3-2 and 6-4-2: The change will provide that a fair 
catch can be made only between the goal lines. 

2-3-3: The revision will provide that a valid fair 
catch signal is the extending and holding or waving of 
one hand only at full arm's length above the head. 

3-4-2, 3, 4: These articles will be rewi-itten to spec- 
ify that 4 time-outs may be charged to a team during 
each half of a game played in 12-minute quarters and 
5 time-outs may be charged to a team during each half 
of a game played in 15-minute quarters. 

6-1-8: The revision will provide that the receivers 
will be required to put the ball in play at the inbounds 
spot if R is the last to touch a free-kick which goes 
out-of bounds between the goal lines. 

6-2-4: An addition to the present coverage will pro- 
vide that " the right of R to take the ball at the spot 
of first touching by K is cancelled if the penalty is 
accepted for a foul committed during the down." 

9-4-1: The word "voluntarily" will be deleted so 
that unless a player is pushed or blocked out-of- 
bounds during the down, he will participate illegally 
if he touches the ball or hinders an opponent after 
being out-of bounds. 

Signals: Officials' signals to indicate: (a) grasping 
a face mask; and (b) an Official's time-out will be 
added to those now used. 

Comments: The Committe directed the deletion of all 
references to the possibility that soft covering for hip, 
rib and shoulder pads be mandatory at some future 
date. 

GENERAL 

1. It was voted to include the following items in the 
1961 questionnaire: 

a. Should the return-kick be eliminated? 

b. Should the ball remain alive on kicks going into 
the receiver's end zone so that it can be advanced ? 

0. Successful try-for-point now scores one point. 

1. Retain present rule. 

2. Score successful try two points for touchdown, one 
for field goal or safety. 

3. Score successful try two points for kick, one for 
touchdown or safety. 

2. The Safety Committee was directed to research 
the possibility of further improving helmets for the 
safety of both the wearer and his opponent. Special 
attention is to be given to the practicability of covering 
the helmet with soft or shock-absorbing material. 

3. The Game Administration Committee was assign- 
ed the study of: 

a. Feasibility of the National Alliance Football Rules 
Committe adopting the Officials' Signals used in Pro- 
fessional Football. 

b. Whether or not it would be preferable to meaEure 
accepted penalties for fouls by the Offense at the end 
of the 1st or 3rd periods before change of goals. 

4. The Equipment Committee was instructed to study 
the various flexible fitted mouth protectors available 
:ind to prepaie a recommended list of them. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



Page Nine 



5. The Research Committee was directed to study 
Football Fundamental 13 and submit a recommenda- 
tion concerning the provision in parentheses. 

6. The Case Book Committee was: 

a. Requested to expand Play 230 or to supplement 
it so as to cover situations when the Defense causes 
the Offense to move from an interior line position. 

b. Insti-ucted to revise Play 262A so that it correlates 
with Play 212 of Interpretations to be Checked. It was 
suggested the last sentence of 262A be deleted. 

7. A motion to delete Play 206 from the Case Book 
was thoroughly debated and then voted down. 

8. A proposal that it be illegal for linebacker Bl to 
add momentum to the charge of lineman B2 by push- 
ing him into an opponent was discussed and then de- 
feated. 

9. It was proposed that all blocking from the rear be 
illegal or that the zone in which it is permitted be re- 
duced to 3 yards on either side of the snap and 1 yard 
behind each scrimmage line. The proposal was defeat- 
ed. 

10. A motion to authorize the Referee to give the 
Offense the option of replaying a down when the ball 
becomes dead because of in inadvertently blown whis- 
tle was thoroughly debated. The motion was lost. 

11. A proposal to start the clock when a free-kick 
is touched was discussed but received only limited sup- 
port and upon vote was defeated. 

12. After considerable debate, it was the Committee's 
decision not to include in the 1961 questionnaire the 
following item: For forward pass interference by team 
B — Team A's ball at spot of foul, 1st down of foul 
occurs in field of play. If foul occurs in team B's end 
zone — Team A's ball, 1st down on team B's one yard- 
line. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, that the action by 
the Commissioner and the President be approved by 
the Board. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that all bills of the Association, for the period begin- 
ning December 22, 1960, and ending January 27, 1961, 
be approved. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 

KNOX OFFICIALS ASSOCIATION 

Dr. John L. Fletcher of Fort Knox, Interim Secre- 
tary of the Knox Officials Association, reports that a 
group of athletic officials met at Fort Knox on Janu- 
ary 18, 1961, "with the intent of forming an athletic 
officials association with an established ultimate goal 
of being able to provide well qualified and impartial 
athletic officials to the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association." Dr. Fletcher states that the 
initial aim of the association is to provide football 
officials for the 1961-62 season. From those present, a 
slate of officers was elected, subject to confirmation 
by the entire membership during the first general 
meeting which has been scheduled tentatively for July 
1961, at which time training and clinics will start fo}' 
the season. The officers elected were as follows: Presi- 
dent, Walter H. Roettger; Vice-President, Han-y Ellis; 
Secretary- Treasurer, William M. Mayhew; Senior As- 
scoiation Advisor, A. L. Perry. 



KAPOS Bulletin 

Plans are in the making to hold a Ken- 
tucky cheerleader and baton twirling camp 
during the month of August. Look for fur- 
ther information in your next KAPOS news 
letter. It is not too late to submit interest- 
in? news items to be included in The News 
letter. Let Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, College of Ed- 
ucation, University of Kentucky, know about 
the honors your cheerleaders have won, 
original ideas for pep rallies, new yells, etc., 
and she will feature them in this next issue. 
Runner-Up Cup to be Awarded 

KAPOS is pleased to announce that both 
a winner's and a runner-up cup will be given 
to cheerleaders at the 1961 State Tourna- 
ment. 

Flans for the State Tournament 

Again, the Kentucky Association of Pep 
Organization Sponsors (KAPOS) will have 
a "Welcome Booth" set up in the Coliseum, 
somwhere near the main entrance, for the 
sole purpose of registering and greeting you. 
Please stop by and visit with fellow sponsors. 

Perhaps you would like to have a part in 
making known to the public just what is in- 
volved in being a cheerleader sponsor. If so, 
we can use you for radio interviews or pos- 
sibly a television program. It would expedite 
schedules if you could let us know in advance 
as to whether or not you will be available for 
such an interview. 

Please notify either Mrs. Milly Rodes, 
Transylvania College, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb 
at the University of Kentucky of your will- 
ingness to take part in the "interview pro- 
gram" by sending us your name and the 
dates on which you will be available for an 
interview. 

Board members of KAPOS will have a 
room at the hotel on the same floor as the 
cheerleaders. You are encouraged to call on 
them in any way you see fit. They are there 
to evaluate all cheerleaders but they will not 
be too busy to help you with your problems. 
Principals Must Send Confirmation 

Principals who wish their cheerleaders to 
be considered for the annual cheerleader 
award should be prompt in their reply, stat- 
ing that their cheerleaders are being chaper- 
oned during their entire stay at the State 
Tournament by a school-approved chaperon ; 
and the name of the chaperon should be 
given. Send confirmation by telegram to: 
President Nelda Smith (KAPOS), Phoenix 
Hotel, Lexington, Kentucky. 

The Cheerleader selection will be made (jn 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



the following basis: 

1. Appearance (neatness and general 
good grooming) 

2. Ability to execute the yells 

3. Ability and effort displayed in con- 
trol over own rooters 

4. Appropriateness of the choice of yells 

5. Conduct while in unifrom (gum 
chewing, smoking, using intoxicants 
or profane language. This applies to 
rest rooms, hotels, etc.) 

6. Pep and enthusiasm displayed dui-ing 
cheering 

7. Sportsmanship (toward opponents 
and officials) 

Method of grading, based on possible 70 
point total, is as follows: Excellent, 10 pts. ; 
Good, 7 pts. : Fair, 5 pts. : and Poor, 2 pts. 

Is Your School A Member? 

If you have not paid you $2.00 school mem- 
bership, plan to do so at the State Tourna- 
ment. KAPOS needs your backing. Join now ! 

Memberships received after November 1 
are: Henry Clay High School, Auburn High 
School, Good Shepherd High School, St. 
Henry High School, St Camillus Academy, 
Pulaski County High School. 

Competitive Sports 

by Dwight Keith 

AT NO TIME in our national history has 
it been more important to develop and em- 
phasize sports — particularly competitive 
sports. In our early history and until a couple 
of generations ago, our society was predomi- 
nantly rural in nature. The rural life pro- 
vided physical activity for the boys and girls 
of that time. Having been a boy on an Ala- 
bama farm we do not have to do research to 
learn that the rural life provides amply 
physical activity for the growing boy. The 
usual farm chores occasionally spiced with 
a little hunting and fishing kept a 1 oy from 
"going stale" physically. 

Today, however, our society is predomin- 
antly urban and the need for planned recrea- 
tion is much greater. Many of our readers 
will never believe this, but there are people 
today, some of them in positions of author- 
ity, who advocate curtailment or al)olition of 
athletics in our schools. Fortunately, these 
peo~;le are in the minority and fortunately, 
they are in the wrong and since we believe 
that the right will ultimately prevail, we 
have less cause to be concerned with their 
views. 

Should we abolish athletics in our 
schools? We would only drive it into the 
vacant lots and under the supervision of un- 



qualified leaders. Remember this — play 
is a strong instinct. The kids will continue to 
play and compete on teams, but, instead of 
school teams it will be community or com- 
mercial team coached, in many cases, by un- 
trained personnel or questionable character. 
In other words, athletics would lose most of 
its educational aspects. The school, the com- 
munity and the boys would be the big losers. 
We hear a great deal about Russia's super- 
iority in the field of science and this has led 
many uninformed people to advocate the 
abolition of sports in an all-out effort in 
science. These critics of competitive sports 
are not aware of the fact the the two requir- 
ed subjects in Russian schools are science 
and physical education. Russia is laying 
great stress on sports since they, too, real- 
ize that the mind needs the sound body. 

— From the Coaoh and Athlete 

Smoking And Sports 

Comment by the National Federation and the A.M.A. 

The best way to stop smoking is not to 
start. Young people need to know that once 
they begin smoking it is a stubborn habit to 
break. This is especially important for the 
athlete who wants to achieve peak perfor- 
mance. 

According to the Committee on the Medi- 
cal Aspects of Sports of the American Medi- 
cal Association, it is unwise for a young man 
who has ambitions to excel in sports to begin 
smoking or to continue the habit if he has 
already started. The Committee noted that, 
while the effects of tobacco vary in different 
people, the following conclusions seem war- 
ranted : 

1. That in smoking some carbon monoxide 
may be absorbed thereby reducing tempor- 
arily the oxygen-carrying power of the blood. 

2. That habitual smoking when the 
stomach is empty tends to produce digestive 
distur ances and distress. 

3. That habitual smoking sometimes leads 
to an irritable nervous system and that this 
reaction is more likely in young people. 

4. That in certain persons the constrict- 
ing effect of tobacco on the blood vessels 
may contribute to the development of cir- 
culatory disorders. 

5. That habitual cigarette smoking vnth 
inhalation irritates the delicate membranes 
of the throat and lungs and may induce 
"cigarette cough" and render the throat 
more susceptible to infection. 

The relation of the above factors to ath- 
letic particpation is rather cle-^r, the A.M.A. 
Committee said. Frequently the difference 
between winning and losing in athletics is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1961 



Page Eleven 



a half stride, a fraction of a second, or a few 
inches. Although a particular athlete may 
not react perceptibly to smoking, iFs effects 
can make this difference. Even a champion 
athlete who smokes could be better if he 
were free of the habit. 

Apart from athletic performance, there 
is the important matter of a possible con- 
nection between smoking and lung cancer 
and smoking and heart and blood vessel dis- 
ease. Fact-finding bodies assert that there is 
an increasing body evidence indicating such 
a relationship. Young people who do not form 
the smoking habit or stop smoking before it 
becomes too stubborn need have no worry 
about this problem. 



Teaching Sportsmanship 

By Lee K. Anderson, Commissioner 
Oklahoma H. S. A. A. 

How do you teach sportsmanship? This 
question was asked following a panel discus- 
sion during which it had been suggested that 
sportsmanship, rather than the development 
of a healthy, strong, agile and skillful body 
was the most valuable outcome of sports 
participation. The greatest challenge to 
coaches, other teachers and administrators is 
in the area of education where character and 
personality traits and the social being are 
developed. What, then, is the answer to the 
question of how to teach sportsmanship? 

One answer is that sportsmanship is 
caught rather than taught. The coach, the 
administrators and the faculty influence the 
student body by their example, therefore, 
their agreements on standards and their in- 
dividual commitment to honesty, honor and 
integrity in the broad policies and in the 
minute details of operation of the athletic 
program are basic. There is an old proverb 
which says that: "One example is worth a 
thousand words." Emerson put it: "What 
you are speaks so loudly I can't hear what 
you say." 

Boys and girls of high school age are idea- 
listic. Students should be encouraged to 
think and plan on the high level of their 
ideals. Through leadership of Student Coun- 
cils, students may be given an opportunity to 
express their desires as to what should be 
the standards of conduct in connection with 
their sicihool athletics. Some of our best ob- 
served codes of ethics are formulated by 
the students themselves. 

DIGNITY OF HUMAN PERSONALITY 

To have lasting results there must be 
reasoned conclusions as the basis of the stu- 
dent's understanding of his own self and his 



attitudes in relationship with others. Le- 
Compe du Nouy, in "Human Destiny," says: 
"Education consists in preparing the moral 
character of a child, in teaching him the few 
fundamental and invariable principles ac- 
cepted in all the countries of the world. It 
consists in giving him from tenderest child- 
hood the notion of human dignity. Education 
directs his actions, inspires his behavior in 
all his contacts with mankind and helps 
him to master himself. It gives him the un- 
alterable foundation of his life." It is when 
one's understanding of himself and his re- 
lation to others in exemplified in connection 
with an athletic activity that sportsman- 
ship is possible. 

Sportsmanship is not a new ideal. Its 
message is as old as the Biblical admonition 
to "go the second mile" or "to turn the other 
cheek." Its foundation is based on the fact 
that mankind was created on a plane above 
the animals, with a mind capable of reason- 
ing and distinguishing right from wrong. 
There needs to be developed a respect for 
the dignity of human personality. This be- 
gins with self-respect. Self-respect cannot 
be isolated, for attitude and conduct in re- 
lation to others is very much a part of it. 
Each individual, through the use of his mind 
and his power to reason and choose, is large- 
ly master of his own destiny. Every thought 
and act, whether alone or in relation to 
others, is a step forward or backward. Only 
as the individual acts and reacts on a high 
plane is mankind elevated and civilization 
advanced. An understanding of and respect 
and reverence for the God-given dignity of 
human personality is essential if our path of 
destiny leads upward. 

A GRANTED PRIVILEGE 

Our school sports are not a life and death 
matter. They are for the pleasure and edu- 
cation of the participants and the student 
body. School games and contests are govern- 
ed by rules and ethics of behavior. The ad- 
ministration, faculty, coach, participants and 
fans are honor-bound to abide by them. Dur- 
ing the game each individual is put to test 
and if there is self-mastery, integrity and 
honor firmly imbedded in the individual's 
personality and character, the game officals 
or the policemen on the sideline will have no 
unpleasant duties to perform. When you 
are committed to the rules and the ethics of 
the sport your honor and self-respect bind 
you and what an opposing player may do 
will not cause you to retaliate and thus re- 
vert to the law of the "claw and the fang," 
which is practiced among animals. Sports- 
manship is Ohristian ethics put in practice 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, I9fi1 




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LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 2-8522 



in athletics. The goals are lofty but within 
the possible attainment of all, as many ath- 
letes can te.stify. 

Representing a school in an athletic con- 
test is a privilege granted those students 
deemed to be worthy of the accompanying 
responsibility. It is granted, boys and girls 
are immature and impulsive. Should there 
be a failure in self-control that leads to con- 
duct that cannot be approved, prompt and 
positive action by the coach (and in flagrant 
cases by the administration) is necessary 
if the desired educational outcome is real- 
ized. The erring individual's attitude and 
acts are a failure to uphold his own honor, a 
reflection upon his parents, coach and teach- 
ers, misrepresentation of the standards ad- 
vocated by the students and faculty of his 
school and a handicap in the form of a pen- 
alty placed upon his teammates and the pos- 
sible success of the team. When he is con- 
fronted with and led to accept the results of 
his acts it will strengthen his self-respect for 
school authorities. Voluntary expressions of 
regrets and making of amends are commend- 
able, but often some forfeit of the privilege 
of representing the school is advisable. 



TPACK AND FIELD RULES 

RULES REVISIONS, most of which are of a minor 
nature, are included in the new edition of the Track 
and Field Rules and Records Book which came from 
the press in January. 

Rule 1-C: It is suggested that if more than one 
stagger is marked within a lane, a different colored 
mraker be used for each stagger. 

Rule 2-3-Note: Record applications in the 100 yards 
dash, 220 yards dash, hurdles and broad jump must 
include anemometer reading made during the event. 
The reading of two anemometers are necessary for 
races involving one curve. 

Rule 8-2: For events around one or two turns and 
run in lanes, the Games Committee may permit heat 
winners to draw for select lanes. 

Rule 8-4 : Both runners and baton must be within the 
exchange zone dui'ing the entire exchange. 

Rule 8-4: Baton must be uniform in circumference 
with no corrugations nor ridges. 

Rule 9-2: Coverage now specifies that when con- 
testant clears the bar and his pole falls forward and 
rests against the bar or upright standard, it ia an 
unsuccessful trial. 

Rule 9-6: A discus either .4375 or .48 inch thick at a 
distance of .24 inch from the outer edge is legal. 

SITUATION RULING: 37S: For the 880 relay, it 
is recommended that the first 440 be run in lanes with 
the third i-unner on each relay team being permitted 
to "cut" for the pole. 

SUPPLEMENT: All tables have been brought up-to- 
date and results for previous year's finals are included. 



Wb Ship The DaV You BuV 



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CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
MARCH 15th thru MARCH 18th, 1961 



We will be in Lexington, Kentucky for the K. H. S. A. A. Basketball Tourna- 
ment from Wednesday, March 15th thru Saturday, March 18tlh, 1961. 

Make our room on the second floor at the Phoenix Hotel your headquarters, 
for it will be the meeting place for players, coaches and all of your friends. 

We will have on display an advance showing of football and basketball 
equipment for the coming 1961 season, and, of course, will have samples of 
our new 1961 line of baseball, softball and track supplies. 

See our complete line of award sweaters, award jackets, award blankets 
and trophies on which we can give very, very good delivery. 

Our latest spring and summer catalog was mailed to you last week, and if 
you have failed to receive your copy, write us, and we will gladly send an- 
other one to you. 

Again this year, the same as for the past few years, the Adolpih F. Rupp 
signature basketball No. APR and the MacGregor No. XIOL will be used in 
the K. H. S. A. A. State Tournament. 

Our representatives, together with two or three factory salesmen, will be 
on hand to extend a warm welcome along with a little Southern Hospitality 
so we will be looking for you too. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 



WHILE you ARE IN LEXINGTON 

FOR THE 

State Basketball Tournament 

Visit Our Sample Room 
2nd Floor Phoenix Hotel 

YOU are cordially invited to join the happy 
throng of players . . . coaches . . . fans . . . celebrities 
. . . school and factory representatives v/ho make our 
special Sample Room their meeting place and head- 
quarters during the Tournament. 

YOUR traveling Kentuc';y school representatives: 
Bill Shannon, Chuck Shuster and Al Seekamp will be 
there to greet you. 

It will be our pleasure to show you the new 1961 
nationally advertised football and basketball equip- 
ment, honor sweaters, 
and award [ackets. 



-P 






VJrhe For Our Spring 
Catalog 

If you have not received 
your copy of the new 1961 ^ 
Sutcliffe Catalog which 
features the very finest in 
Baseball - Track - Softball - 
Tennis and other Athletic 
Equipment, please let us 
know at once — by letter or 
post card. 



UT( 



225-227 So. 4th St., Louisville, Ky. 



MS£M:y 




Hiqh School AniMe 

The Greatest Show on Earth — Kentucky Edition 





\ 



It Won't Be Long, Now! 



OHical Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 19B1 




l* J 



s:n:>cn^x>,>osjs>>Ov.>,>>os>ov£njv>Ov>os>>3v>o-ov:>-5^ 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night ; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 
And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
\\\ fans are birds of a feather 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1961 



1.00 Per Year 



GUEST EDITORIALS 

Who Lets the Game Get Out of Hand? 

It is not unusual for the State Office to 
receive reports from coaches and athletic 
directors to the effect that the officials "let 
the game get completely out of hand." Each 
time such a report is received we wonder 
whether the officials sihould be called upon 
to accept the entire responsibility. Who real- 
ly lets a game get out of hand? Who is held 
responsible for unsportsmanlike acts on the 
floor or field? On this point, Association 
rules are quite clear. It is the responsibility 
of the schools and the school representatives 
to maintain the highest ethics of good atti- 
tudes and good sportsmanship. The officials 
can only inflict penalties and, if occasion de- 
mands, eject players from the game. This 
authority is not always enough to insure 
sportsmanlike attitudes. 

To be sure, a competent official ; one who 
has the know-how and the courage to call a 
game the way it should be called, can some- 
times by the sheer force of his personality 
keep the game from becoming a brawl. Yet, 
there are situations where a coach must 
intervene. As soon as a coach sees one of his 
players lose his temper or otherwise conduct 
himself in an unsportsmanlike manner, he 
should replace this player at the first oppor- 
tunity. This should be done, not only to pre- 
vent the possibility of game deterioration, 
but because a player in this state will seldom 
play good ball and may cause his team to be 
penalized. Quite often a conference with the 
coach will cause the disturbed player to 
settle down and regain his composure after 
which he might be permitted to re-enter. If, 
thereafter, his conduct has not improved, he 
should be withdrawn permanently. No coach 
has a right to expect an official to serve as 
a disciplinarian. Instilling right attitudes and 
controlling the emotions of players under 
ihiis direction remains the coach's prime re- 
sponsibility and his precious privilege. 

This matter of keeping a game under con- 
trol is the joint responsibility of the coach 
and the officials. The responsibility thus 



places coach and official on the same side. 
Any actions on the part of a coach which 
would indicate to the spectators that he must 
"defend and protect" Ms players against the 
officials is looking for cheap sympathy and 
may be, furthermore, inciting a riot. The 
official who is inconsistent, hesitant, in- 
efficient and lacking in courage, increases 
the problems of the coach as he tries to keep 
his players on an even keel. With coach and 
official presenting a united front and giving 
the impression of working toward a common 
goal, no game should ever get out of hand. 
— The Illinois Interscholatsic 



Etiquette For Tournament Fans 

For general whackiness, there is nothing 
quite like the basketball tournament season. 

This creates more new sports fans than 
the Irish Sweepstakes. 

Entire villages go into hysteria as their 
educated darlings take each step closer to 
the state finals. 

Be they from Arohbold, Castalia, Barnes- 
ville, Strasburg, Arcanum, Peebles, Glouster 
or Mogadore, dads and mothers and children 
are suddenly afficted with "tournament 
fever." 

Men who never knew whether a basket- 
ball is pumped or stuffed start shrieking 
with ever play — "pick," "screen" and "hor- 
ray for our side." 

So do women who wouldn't know a bonus 
free throw from a triple dribble, and kids 
who aren't quite sure if a basketball is round 
or square. 

This tournament business, in the rural 
outposts, is something between a Roman 
Holiday and the county fair. 

On certain evenings, villaiges in Ohio will 
move — lock, stock and barrel — to some near- 
by city to see their young heroes in the next 
countdown. 

Because basketball is new, or strange,, 
these "fans" might do well to study and ad- 
here to the Code of Decorum such as Emily 
Post might prescribe for tournament travel 
and gymnasium conduct. 

(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



MARCH, 1961 



VOL. XXHI— NO. 8 



cept June and July, by the Kentucky 



Hisrh School -Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 



Editor THEO A. SANFOUD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1957-Sl). Marion 

Vice-President. W. B. Jones (19D7-r,l). Somerset 

Directors— W. H. Crowdus (1958-621. Franklin: Jack Dawson 
11958-62), Loiisville: Robert P. Fors>-the (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. i;!llasr!e (1959-631. Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-64), Pa ntsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-641 Harlan. 



Subscriptii 



Rate 



_S1.00 Per Ye 



-from the Ci 



omtnissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1960-61 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketcall Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



SPRING MEETS 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious spring meets and tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track, and tennis. They are as 
follows : 

May 5-6. regional tennis tournaments 
(girls) 

May 8. regional tennis tournament? 
(boys) 
May 9-11, district baseball tournaments 
:\Iay 12 - 13. State Tennis Tournament 
(girls) regional track meets 

May 15-16. State Tennis Tournament 
(boys) 
May 17, regional golf tournaments 
May 19-20, State Track Meet 
May 23-24, State Golf Tournament 
May 25-26, re7ional baseball tournaments 
June 7, 8, State Ba.seb.Tll Tournament 

BOARD ELECTION 

At the copy deadline for this issue of the 
ATHLETE, ])rincipals in Sections 1 and 6 
were still balloting in the election for Board 
of Control membership. There were three 
candidates in Section 1. They were: Supt. 
Joe P. Duke, Benton City Schools; Ath. Dir. 
Preston Holland, Murray High School; and 
Prin. Frank B. Simpson, Attucks High 
School. The three candidates in Section 6 
were: Supt. James E. Baker, Monticello 
Public Sc-hools; Prin. Joe Ohr, Irvine High 
School, and Prin. Don R. Rawlings, Danville 
High School. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Li.«t Compiled March 1) 

If one telenhone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bunting. John Louis, College Station. Murray, PL 3-1950 
Dixie. Cornelius P.. 608 South Clav. Louisville, Ju 7-7680, EM 

6-9.^61 Ext. 636 
Dutv. Bill. Cline St.. Pikeville 
England, James. Shelhiana, GE 7-7856 
Figg, Chares Raymond, 1008 Navaho Trail, Frankfort, CA 

7-2146. CA 3-0565 
Fvffe. Robert G.. Beverly 
Hurley. Darrell F.. 1637 Miller St.. Murray 
Montsomerv. Gordon D., Hq. KMAG (DCSPERl. APO 102, San 

Francisco. Calif. 
South. William F.. ISO Versailles Rd. Frankfort, CA 7-6565 
Swann. Randall Rov. 110 South 9th St.. Central City 
Wearren. Wade H.. College Station. Murray 

"CERTIFIED" OFFICIALS 

Fo"r additional basketball officials have qualified for the 
■■Ccr'ified' rating. Thev are: Bert .A. Bennett, Earl S. Duncan. 
Frank J. :\Iue!ler. Lloyd G. Whipple. 

Baseball Rulings 

Edilor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or mdoify 
any rule. They are interpretations of some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

\. Play — There is one out with Rl on 2nd and R2 
on 1st. B4 hits safely. Rl and R2 safely cross home 
in^e. Bl is tagged out sliding into 3rd. Rl failed to 
touch home base when crossing it but R2 did touch it. 
Defensive team makes an appeal on Rl at home base. 

Ruling — The run by R2 counts. R2 touched home 
bn.=e befoie the 3rd out. The appeal on Rl is consider- 
ed a second out. R2 scored before B4 was tagged out 
at :ird which is considered the 3rd out. (9-1-1-a) 

2. Play — Rl is on 2nd and it is the batting turn of 
B3. However, B5 bats and doubles which scores Rl. 
As B6 appears at bat, it is discovered that B5 batted 
out of order: (a) before first pitch to Bfi; or (b) 
after first pitch to B3. 

Ruling — (a) B3 is declared out; Rl returns to 2nd. 
B4 is the next proper batter after B.5 batted, (b) 
Ignore the violation. B6 is the next proper batter. 
(7-1-1 and Penalty) 

3. Play— It is the time of B4 to bat but B6 errone- 
ously bats and: (a) hits safely; or (b) strikes out. B4 
then bats and draws a walk. B5 follows and walks. It 
is now the rightful turn of Bfi to bat. 

Ruling — There is no penalty. In (a), B6 is left on 
base and B7 becomes the batter. In (b), B6 is entitled 
to bat again since it is now his rightful turn in the 
batting order. (7-1-1 and Penalty) 

4. Play — Batter appears at bat with a wooden bat 
which has a nylon wristlet stretched tight and cemented 
on the handle. Coach of defensive team objects. 

Ruling — Such nylon sleeve tightly stretched and 
cemented to the handle of the bat is not illegal pro- 
vided it does not extend along the handle more than 
18 inches from g)ip end of the bat. (1-3-5) 

.5. Play— With Rl on 3rd and R2 on 2nd, B3 is 
throw.! out at 1st by F6. During the throw, F5 temp- 
orai-ily impedes the advance of Rl who does score. 
However. R2 attempts to advance to 3rd but, when he 
sees Rl is olistructed, he returns to 2nd. 

Ruling — B3 is out. Run by Rl counts and R2 is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Page Three 



awarded 3rd base. (8-3-1-c and Note) 

6. Play— With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, B3 hits 
past F8 to centerfield fence. F6 obstructs Rl. R2 
passes Rl between 2nd and 3rd bases. Rl then reach- 
es 3rd, B3 reaches 2nd and R2 crosses home base. 

Ruling — R2 is declared out for passing Rl. Be- 
cause Rl undoubtedly would have scored had there 
been no obstruction. Umpire will declare the ball dead 
and award home base to him. B3 will remain on 2nd. 
(8-3-1-c-Note; 8-4-2-h; 9_l_l_Note) 

7. Play — It is first half of 1st inning with Bl 
at bat and none out. Fl has a count of 2 and 2 on Bl. 
The next pitch is called ball 3. Fl takes exception to 
the call and charges toward home plate using profane 
language. 

Ruling- — Umpire shall order Fl from the game 
immediately. (3-1-2 Exception; 3-3-1-a) 

8. Play — Coach of the team in the field requests 
time, to confer with players, and it is that team's 
fourth charged conference of game. This results in Fl 
being removed from game as pitcher for its duration. 
SI pitches three balls to first batter when Coach again 
reo.uests time and confers with SI. 

Ruling — SI must be removed as pitcher for dura- 
tion of game. NOTE: If a Coach repeatedly does this, 
it soon becomes obvious that it is being done to de- 
lay game and Umpire may refuse to grant time on 
the grounds that the Coach is making a travesty of 
the game. (3-1-2 Exception) 

9. Rl is on 3rd base with one out. B3 hits fly ball 
to F8, which is caught for 2nd out. Rl leaves base 
prior to catch and crosses home. F8 overthrows home 
and ball goes into grandstand. When a new ball is 
properly put in play and has become alive, Fl throws 
the ball to F5 who tags 3rd and appeals to Umpire 
that Rl did not tag up after catch by F8. 

Ruling — Rl is called out. No run is scored. (2-9-1; 
2-11-6; 8-2-1) 

10. Play — Rl is on 3rd and R2 on 1st, with one out. 
B4 hits fly ball to F8. Rl tags up and scores after 
catch by F8. R2 does not tag up at 1st. On the throw- 
in, he is caught in a rundown and tagged out. Does 
run scored by Rl count. If defensive team had appeal- 
ed at 1st base for failure of R2 to tag up, woiild this 
result in a double play and, thus, cancel score by Rl. 

Ruling — Run scored by Rl counts provided he 
touched home base prior to R2 being tagged out. If Rl 
touched home base prior to an appeal being made at 
1st on R2. run by Rl counts. (9-1-1) 

11. Play — Bl swings at pitch and tops ball which 
rolls in direction of 3rd base on fair ground. The bat 
breaks on impact of the ball against it and, as ball is 
rolling toward 3rd, part of the bat hits the ball per- 
mitting Bl to reach 1st safely. 

Ruling — If the batter definitely did not throw the 
broken portion of the bat at the ball, the ball is in 
play and, in this play, Bl is credited with a hit (8-4-1- 
c; 9-3-2) 

12. Play — Coach requests and is granted time to 



confer with Fl, after which Fl: (a) exchanges posi- 
tions with F4; or (b) continues to pitch; or (c) is 
removed from game. 

Ruling — In (a) and (b), conference is charged. In 
(c), it is not recoi'ded except when optional reentry 
rule is being used and then only if Fl were eligible to 
reenter game as pitcher. (3-3-1-c) 

13. Play — Coach of team in the field requests and 
receives time to confer with Fl who is injured or ill. 
Fl: (a) is removed from the game; (b) exchanges 
positions with F4; or (c) remains in game as pitcher. 

Ruling — No conference is ever charged when it is 
necessitated because a player is incapacitated. (3-3-1-c) 

14. Play — Fl the, starting pitcher, loses his pitch- 
ing control and needs to be relieved. His Coach realizes 
that the team would be charged with a conference if 
SI replaced Fl (the optional reentry rule is being 
used and Fl is eligible to reenter once as pitcher), or 
if Fl and F9 exchange positions. Therefore, Coach 
requests time to inform the Umpire-in-Chief of the 
changes in line-up and returns to bench. 

Ruling — This is legal. No conference is charged 
and Fl is eligible to return to the mound later in the 
game and pitch. (3-3-1-c) 

15. Play — Rl is on 1st. Right handed Fl has hands 
at his side when he: (a) places his pivot foot on 
pitcher's plate and his left foot behind it, after which 
he brings his hands together in front of his body with 
ball in them and pauses in this position, observing Rl 
on 1st before pitching to batter or throwing to F3; or 
(b) Fl already has ball in both hands together in 
front of his body when he places his feet in wind-up 
stance on pitcher's plate and then pauses while ob- 
serving Rl on 1st, after which he pitches to batter or 
steps directly with non-pivot foot toward F3 and 
throws ball to him. 

Ruling— (a) Balk, (b) Legal. (6-1-2 and 3; 6-2-4) 
Comment — The position of a pitcher's feet, when 
he is on the pitcher's plate, determines whether he is 
in the wind-up or set position. When there is a runner 
(or runners) on base and pitcher places his feet in 
wind-up position stance, subsequent movement of his 
arm or arms commits him to pitch to batter without 
any interiaiption of the motion. However, if pitcher, 
when he is on pitcher's plate and his feet are in wind- 
up stance, desires to throw to any occupied base, or 
feint a throw to 2nd or 3rd base when occupied, he 
must step toward that base with his non-pivot foot 
prior to or simultaneously with any movement of his 
arm or arms. 

16. Play — Rl is on 1st and breaks for 2nd with 
pitch. F2 tips bat of B2, who hits ball on ground 
weakly to Fl. throws erratically over the head of F3 
and ball goes into right field. Rl advances to 3rd and 
continues on toward home. B2 goes to 2nd. F9 re- 
trieves the ball and thi'ows to F2, who tags Rl out 
sliding at home base. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Pase Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

In no sport does judgment enter into as 
many decisions as basketball. A split second 
decision or one of hundreds of play situations 
ruled on instantaneously by the officials de- 
termine nightly whether teams, evenly 
matched, win or lose. 

The fact that basketball officiating calls 
for 90'. judgment as opposed to the exercise 
of 10' < rules knowledge demands that the 
"Whistler" prove himself a man as well as an 
official every time he sizes up a situation. 

A worried official was concerned about 
his officiating future because the press has 
been castigating him for a call the Dutchman 
knew he had made coiTectly a few nights 
before in an important game. He said, 
"Dutchman, these stories are going to hurt 
me." My reply was that no stories or any- 
thing else can hurt any official who has the 
"guts" to be courageous and honest. Any- 
body, who officiates long enough, will face 
these situations sooner or later, and that's 
when he will know if he is a man or a boy. 
As long as an official enforces the rules to 
the best of his knowledge, he is a credit to 
the K. H. S. A. A. 

Today an official must study. He must 
know the rules like no attorney ever has had 
to know the law he practices. He must study 
constantly to know all of the several hun- 
dred different play situations involved in 
basketball. Besides that he has a third book 
to study along with the rule book and the 
volume of play situations — That's the of- 
ficials manual. Add to this .study the addi- 
tional time and concentration involved in the 
clinics he must attend and the "Man With 
The Whistle" must qualify for some kind of 
degree. 

It wasn't that way when the Dutchman 
worked his first game between Woodl)urn 
and Brownsville in 1928. Turner Elrod, now 
a coach at Western, had this game and 
couldn't go so he offered it to anybody who 
w;is hungry enough to hitch-hike a thirty- 
mile round trip and referee three games for 
S5.00. 

Back in the late twenties all that was 
necessary to qualify one as an official was 
the possession of a twenty-five cent whistle. 
A rule book wasn't too important. This writer 
officiated a year before he ever knew the 
rules were written down in a book somebody 
had published. Can't help remembering a dis- 
trict tournament my college Coach Ed Diddle 
and I officiated in Tompkinsville in 1929. I 



asked Coach Diddle if he had a rule book 
and he said, "Jakie, I gottem all right here 
in my head." Today, nobody's head is big 
enough to carry the load. 

If you are an official today just try to 
get along without a rule book, a case book 
with more than two hundred rulings plus an 
official's manual! Yeah, just try! The morn- 
ing after a game played in the state I had 
calls from one Coach and the two officials 
involved before mv hot, young blood had 
warmed the seat of my swivel chair. 

Here was the situation: Team A scored; 
Team B had the ball out of bounds on the 
end for a throw-in when A2 asked for a 
time-out which the referee refused to grant 
because he said Team A could wreck Team 
B's fast break with this time-out. RULING: 
The referee was wrong. Either team may 
call time-out when the ball is dead. 

Look at this one: Al calls time-out. In 
10 .seconds team A is ready to play but Team 
B refuses to play until the full 60 seconds 
have elapsed. 
RULING : Start play when Team A is ready. 

St. Francis High School of Loretto gets 
the Duchman's Abou Ben Adhcm citation 
for February. The good neighbor idea prac- 
ticed there is so outstanding that an ava- 
lanche of mail called for recognition of 
Sportsmanlike crowds ; courteous treatment 
of officials and clean, hard competition by 
the teams. Sr. Mary Carl, principal, is an 
excellent leader who knows how to project 
sound philosophy. 

Every! ody knows Max Macon as a lead- 
ing college basketball official. Many remem- 
ber him as a pitcher for the Dodgers or man- 
ager of Montreal and St. Paul baseball teams. 
All of us now salute him as the Corn Cob 
Pipe Winner for this month. 

During his off-season in the fall and win- 
ter Max gives countless hours of his day to 
boys and girls of school age who want to 
learn to play golf. For three months Max 
has given every day to working with young- 
sters in a .Junior Golf Academy in the Louis- 
ville Armory. Drop in any Saturday and 
watch about five hundred youngsters swing- 
ing golf clubs because somebody cared 
enough to work for them and with them — for 
the love of kids. The thoroughbred, with the 
Corn Cob Pipe adorning its neck, IS YOURS 
Max. 

March 20th is your deadline for telling 
us about the Game Guy you are sponsoring 
for 1961. The physically-handicapped pro- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Page Five 



gram always pays dividends for young 
people. 

The Dutchman sends a monthly column 
called A New Horizon to your local news- 
paper. Drop by and ask your editor, to help 
us promote recreation across the Kentucky. 
See you at the State Tournament! 

GUEST EDITORIALS 

(Continued from Page One) 

Here are some helpful hints: 

Students should cheer for both teams — 
this makes the rivals feel like everybody in 
the joint is pulling for them, and makes 'em 
overconfident. 

A coach should keep his composure at all 
times during and after a tournament game — 
even if one of his own players throws the 
winning points in the other team's basket. 

Spectators should support the cheerleaders 
— in other words, yell, instead of just watch- 
ino" prettv young girls do acrobatics. 

Fans should exercise self-control — by not 
tearing down the nets as victory souvenirs, 
especially if another game is to follow. 

If your team loses, by all means cheer the 
conquerors because they, under the tourna- 
ment set-up, are goino" to get it, too, sooner 
or later. But if they're not going to lose, 
they'll merely be the state champions. There- 
fore, you'll be the first to congratulate them. 

Whole towns need guida)ice also: 

If there are 878 people in town, be sure 
that no more than 877 be allowed to leave for 
the tournament. At least one person should 
remain behind in case of a flood, an oil dis- 
covery, or catch runaway horses on Main 
Street. 

Don't take the fire engine to the tourna- 
ment city — every place has parking problems 
these days. 

And if your town should win the state 
basketball championship, be humble — and, 
above all, be grateful — because chances are 
your team won't win it next year. — Don 
Wolfe in the Toledo Blade 



No More Competition? 

The following article was included in 
Da\id Condon's "In the Wake of the News" 
(Chicago, Illinois), Friday, January 27. We 
are certain you will be interested in it. 

"The desire to let our fury subside has 
prevented previous comment on opinions 
advanced early this month by Dr. James 
Conant, former Harvard University presi- 
dent. But this morning we must take issue 
with the noted educator . . . and if we're 



stepping out of our league, please remember 
that the coaches and athletic directors are 
on our side! 

"In a magazine article. Dr. Conant favored 
the abolition of state high school athletic 
championships . . . and he also asked for an 
end to all sports competition between junior 
high schools. The reason : 'Vicious overem- 
phasis on competitive athletics has, in m.any 
areas, resulted in scihool athletics taking pre- 
cedence over classroom studies.' 

"Any time athletics are emphasized at 
the expense of academics, we favor a reap- 
praisal of the program and subsequent 
toning down. However, this corner hold that 
an under-emphasis of athletics is as danger- 
ous as over-emphasis. Athletics have a place 
in school life, and a good place. And we hold 
that the fellow who works and perspires to 
become captain of the football team, will 
become as valuable a citizen as the bookworm 
who edits the literary magazine, or the boy 
who heads the debating squad. 

"If Dr. Conant could sit beside us at the 
finals of the Illinois or Indiana High School 
basketball tournament, we believe he would 
change his opinion about the abolition of 
championships. We believe he would con- 
clude, as we have, that the youngsters who 
will push so hard to win a game will not be 
found lacking in fortitude when facing life's 
graver competitions. 

"End of sports competition in junior high 
schools ? We hold with Attorney General 
Kennedy, who, we previously reported, be- 
lieves, 'if a game is worth playing, it is worth 
winning.' " 



Athletics and Aging- 



It h^s been said that, "if you want to live 
to a ripe old age, choose your grandparents 
with great care". Even in jest, these are 
not idle words ; it is well known that heredity 
plays a vital role in longevity. Beyond this, 
how athletics affects the natural heritage, 
is a question of much conjecture and study. 

The myth of "athlete's heart" has now 
been largely dispelled. Given a sound organ 
to begin with and barring disease, the ath- 
lete's heart becomes stronger and more 
efficient in response to his activity. The 
heart is essentially muscle and like other 
muscle tissue, its power of contraction 
(pumping action) improves with exercise. 

Nevertheless, there have been persistent 
suggestions that athletes die young and suf- 
fer degenerative disease in greater degree 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Pa.ae Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1960 



NAME 

Allele, George F. 

Albrecht, Roger 

Alnion, James H 

Alston, Rev. E. Deedon _. 
Anderson, E. W., Jr. _-- 

Atkinson, Charlie 

Attick, William E. 

Baker, Charles Joe 

Ballard, Robert A. 

Barbour, Morris H. 

Barlow, Billy 

Barlow, Bob 

Barnett, Willis E. 

Bartels, John 

Raskin, Sylvester 

Bauer, Richard 

Beck, C. Norman 

Bell. Clarence T. 

Be.nnett, Howard "Pete' _ 

Berrv, William F. 

Black, Charles D. 

Blanton, Homer 

Boeh, Bill 

Boeing, Charles F. 

Boemker, Bob 

Bond. Jack C. 

Bonner. John C. 

Bostick, Lord M. J. 

Bowman, Earl G. "Dick" 

Boyles, Jerry 

Brandenburg, Donald E. _ 

Brichler, Joe A. 

Briscoe, E. D. "Corky" ._ 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, Carroll A. — 

Brotzge, Maurice J 

Brown, Bill (G. W.) 

Brown, John W. 

Burke, Daniel 

Burton, John 

Byrd, Harry G. 

Cain, Paul D. 

Caldwell, Charles 

Caiman, E. C, Jr. 

Campbell, John J. 

Campeau. Thomas J. 

Canter, John 

Carlson, David A. 

Carrol, Thomas John 

Car.swell, Ernest Leon, Jr. 

Cathey, Gene S. 

Cecil, A. Morris 

Cecil, John 0., Jr. 

Cisco, Robert Dale 

Clark, Bill W. 

Clark, Owen B. 

Cole, Harold 

Cole, J. B., Jr. 

Coleman, L. J., Jr. "Duke" 
Collier, J. Hamlet, Jr. 

Corea, Frank 

Coulter, William 

Cowan, Robert L. 

Cox, William J. 

Crace, James 

Craft, Bill 

Creasey, Fred 

Creekmore, Lester H. 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 


L3 


7 


I 





9 





1 


3 








9 


2 1 


6 


7 





9 


3 


1 


5 


8 


3 


6 


7 


1 


4 


6 


1 1 





2 


2 


5 
12 


6 
4 


6 1 
1 1 








4 1 


2 


9 


1 i 


1 


2 


1 


,3 


8 


3 1 


.3 


8 








8 


1 


8 


7 





1 








3 


1 


t 


1 


6 


1 


2 


5 





1 





1 


3 


10 


2 


7 


6 


1 


,3 


19 


1 1 


10 


9 


1 


5 


13 


1 


r^ 


6 


1 


14 


11 


1 


1 


2 








7 


1 


8 


11 


3 


10 


2 





4 


8 


1 


5 


12 





5 


6 


2 





9 


1 1 





2 


1 


3 


5 


3 


2 


3 


1 





2 





1 


5 


1 1 


12 


4 


1 


4 


3 





9 


17 


1 


5 


4 


1 


7 


4 


1 


2 


2 





5 


9 





3 


11 


1 


C 


2 








1 





7 


8 





3 


6 


2 


1 








2 


3 





11 


4 


1 


3 


11 


2 


7 


6 


1 





3 





1 


6 


1 


3 


4 





2 


2 


1 


10 


5 


3 


10 



8 

1 



1 


r, 


1 


1 1 



Poor NAME 

1 Crouch, Jack J. 

Crum, Edward E. 

1 Cubbon, George 

Culp, Willard E. 

Current, Ellis Ray 

Dallmann, James W. 

Daniel, Ernest H. 

Davis, Charlie 

2 Davis, Clyde E. 

1 Davis, Webster "Curtis" 

Deaton, Dan 

1 DeMuth, Paul E. 

1 Denton, Charles M. 

DeSantis, Enrico 

Detenber, Gene 

1 Deutsch, T C, Jr. 

Eierolf. William H., Jr. - 

1 DiMuzie, Ralph M. 

Dixie, Corelius P. 

Dorsey, James 

Douglas, Harry B. 

Dotson, W. S." 

Downey, Robert F. 

Drake," Richard R. 

Duke, Jesse W., Jr. 

Durkin, Jack H 

2 Edelen, Ben R. 

Ellsperniann, George A. _ 

Elovitz, Carl 

1 Elrod, Richard L. 

Ensslin, Thomas F. 

Ernst, Ray C. 

Fahey, Bernard D. 

Falls, William M., Sr. -_. 

Farley, Kenneth 

1 Faust, Jack 

Feix, Darl Wade 

Fey, Allen 

Fletcher, John L. 

Florence, Robert H. 

Forbes, J. W. "Jack" ... 

Fortney, Robert L. 

Foster, Berryman 

Foster, J. W. 

Fraley, Bill 

Freese, O. T. 

1 Fugate, E. Hugh 

Fuller, David C. 

Funkhouser, Roy A. 

Gammon, William H. 

Gettler, John F. 

Gibbons, E. G. (Ed) 

Gibson, Fred W. 

Giles, J. W. 

Gluszek, Henry 

3 Golden, Billy Joe 

Gour, Robert A. 

2 Gourley, Harold E. 

Grace, Charles K. 

1 Grace, H. E., Jr. 

Graham, James 

Greene, Omar Paul 

Greene, Paul Dutch 

Griggs, John M. 

Gruneisen, Sam J. 

2 Hadden, Newell P., Jr. __ 

1 Hagan, Joseph "Red" 

Hagerman, Bart 

Hagy, Harold J. 



Kxcel. 


Good 


Fair 





6 


' 


13 


6 


2 


1 





1 


8 
4 


1 
10 


1 ' 
2 





1 








2 





3 


7 





4 


5 





1 


3 








1 


1 





8 


1 1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


7 


1 


1 


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9 


4 


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2 


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1 


3 





1 


3 





1 


2 


I 


1 
1 










G 


4 


1 


4 


10 


8 


27 


6 





4 


15 


4 





9 





10 



5 
3 






5 


1 


1 





4 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


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(i 


5 


1 


10 


10 


1 





2 


1 


3 


5 





() 


4 





(5 


7 


1 


8 


7 


1 


4 


17 





4 


4 


3 





3 





1 


5 





2 


9 


3 1 


3 


4 


4 





3 


1 


11 


2 


1 


r> 


2 





,■5 

1 


7 
3 






2 











1 


1 


8 


8 





'^2 


6 


1 


12 


7 








2 





fi 


10 


2 1 


7 


5 





2 


2 


1 


3 





1 


5 


1 


1 


(5 
5 


6 
8 



2 


30 


7 


1 


;; 


12 


2 


1 


15 


2 


2 





1 



Poor 


















a 







1 

1 








1 




1 




1 




1 



2 

1 
1 
1 








1 







1 







1 


2 




THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 





Page 


Seven 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 


3 





2 


5 








3 








5 








12 I 








6 








7 1 


1 


3 


6 








4 








6 


1 


1 


6 


1 





2 


3 





5 


2 


1 


5 








1 








4 


1 





7 








5 








3 





1 


7 


1 


1 


6 





1 


10 


2 





2 





1 


3 


1 


9 


10 


1 





8 

















9 








3 








16 


5 





6 


1 





3 








4 


3 


1 


4 








3 


2 














8 








3 

















8 








2 








9 





2 


1 








2 





1 


5 


2 





5 





1 


5 


2 





3 





1 


2 


4 





12 


1 





1 


1 





9 








1 








1 








4 


1 














1 








10 


3 


9 


8 








7 








6 








3 








3 


3 


1 


7 








6 








4 


1 





6 





1 











12 


3 


1 


8 


1 





1 








13 


2 


1 



NAME 
Hale, Don C. 

Hanes, Edward C. 

Hail-is, David L. 

Harris, Russell 

HaiTod, Robert 

Hatfield, Gene E. 

Hawkins, Robert W. 

Heinold, F. Thomas 

Heinold, Jack 

Heinz, Frank 

Heinze, John G. 

Hellard, George D., Jr. 

Hertzberger, Robert H. 

Hill, Earl F. 

Hoferer, Louis R. 

Hofstetter, Joe 

Holbrook, William M. __. 

Holeman, D. Fletcher 

Holman, S. T. "Bitsy" __ 

Howerton, Jack, Jr. 

Huber, Carl W. 

Hughes, Robert E. 

Huiet, F. "Whitev" 

Idol, Billy Joe 

Jackson, Dennis M. 

James, Gene 

Jenkins, Kean 

Johnson, Bernard M. 

Johnson, Harry A., Jr. 

Johnson, Frank W. 

Jones, J. Carl 

Kauffman, Victor C. 

Kemper, Russ 

Kerr, Kenneth 

Kimble, Frank 

King, Allen V. 

Kraesig, Charles 

Kyle, Leslie G., Jr. 

Lamb, Billy J. 

Lambert, Irvin 

Lancaster, Morris B. 

Landon, T. J. 

Lawson, Carl E. 

Lawson, Leiand 

Leightenheimer, David 

Lenahan, Thomas F. 

Lewis, Richard, Jr. 

Liber, James M. 

Longenecker, David M. 

Lowe, Eugene T. 

Lowe, Stanford 

Lucas, Gene T. 

Lucas, William S., Jr. 

McBrayer, Donald E. __. 

McClaskey, Booker 

McCollum, Robert G. 

McCowan, Connell 

McGehee, Gordon 

McGlasson, Eugene M. 

McHenry, Louis P. 

McKenzie, Paul 

McMulIan, Cecil 

McQuilling, Gerald 

Makepeace, William "Bill" 

Malone, Donald R. 

Marsili, Lee A. 

Martin, Bill 

Matarazzo, S. M. 

Mathis, Curtis W. 

Mattingly, Hugh 

Mautz, Richard M. 

Maxwell, Ray H. 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 


7 


1 1 








5 


14 I 








4 


4 1 








10 


4 1 


2 


1 


5 


3 1 


1 


1 


10 


4 1 








3 


9 I 


1 


1 


2 


3 1 








9 


1 1 


1 


1 


4 


4 1 


1 1 


1 


2 


3 ! 


1 


1 


5 


2 1 











1 1 


1 





6 


9 1 


3 


1 


7 


2 1 








5 


1 1 


1 





4 


9 I 








11 


8 


2 


1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


15 


12 


3 


1 


5 


3 








8 


7 


1 





1 


3 








6 














2 








5 











17 


2 








11 


5 











5 1 


1 





6 


13 





1 


10 


12 








1 


4 








6 


8 








6 


11 





3 


7 


5 


1 





5 


9 





2 


3 


6 


2 





3 


11 








3 


9 


1 








5 


1 





6 


7 


1 





3 


1 








3 


3 


1 





2 


5 


1 








1 








2 


8 








4 


2 





n 





3 








13 


8 


4 





8 


17 








4 


10 


2 





8 


4 


1 








5 








3 


1 








11 


3 








4 


4 


1 


n 


9 


7 





2 


1 


1 








1 











4 


3 


3 


1 





3 


1 





7 


5 


1 








1 








3 


6 








4 














1 





1 


1 


10 


1 





2 











10 


3 


4 





2 


5 











3 








1 












NAME 

May, E. B., Jr. 

Mayhew, William M. _. 

Mayhugh, Robert 

Mayo, Henry L. 

Meeks, Jack 

Melmige, James 

Mercke, Frank R 

Miller, Kenneth H. 

Minton, Eugene H. 

Mitchell, Emmitt 

Mitchell, Vyron W. 

Moore, Pete 

Moran, Warren Carl 

Mordica, William A. 

Morris, Gene 

Morrissey, Rockne 

Moss, James W. 

Moss, Howard A. 

Mouser, H. D. 

Mudd, Ed 

Mullins, Bobby E. 

Muntan, Peter J. 

Murray, Thomas 

Mussman, Ralph 

Nau, Bill 

Neal, Gene 

Newman, Bill 

Noland, Douglas 

Nord, Bertrand J. 

Nord, Ed 

Nord, Gilbert 

Okruch, Nicholas 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Kenneth 

Osborne, Ted G. 

Overby, H. E. 

Palmer, Carl A. 

Parker, Billy E. 

Parkhurst, David S. Capt. 

Parsley, Clyde E. 

Pate, Lloyd Whitefield _- 

Peden, Harlan C. 

Peeno, Harry R. 

Pence, William 

Perkins, Billy R. 

Perry, L. J. 

Pinson, Eugene 

Poore, William E. 

Potter, William H., Jr. _ 

Powell, Logan 

Prior, Lowell F. 

Pullen, Robert 

Raisor, J. T. 

Raitt, Wm. C. 

Rapp, William 

Ray, Shirley G. 

Reddington, Jim 

Reece, Fred 

Reed, Gordon (Moe) 

Reinhart, Gene 

Renfroe, John E. 

Rentz, Thomas W. 

Rhatigan, Alfred J. 

Riggins, Jason 

Riggs, William T. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr. 

Russell, Charles B., Jr. __ 

Russell, Gary E. 

Russell, Joe 



Excel. 

4 
7 

13 
5 
9 
1 
2 
6 
1 

10 
7 



3 
1 
8 
6 

6 

13 

14 
1 

13 
1 

17 
1 

6 
6 
2 
1 

10 

15 
2 
8 
2 
2 

10 
4 
2 
3 

10 
1 
3 

14 
1 

12 


8 
1 
5 

3 

11 
4 
1 
6 

11 
4 

6 
2 

20 

13 

12 



Pase Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



NAME 

Sabato, Al 

Sacra, Gresham 

Sanders, Mel 

Sauter, Harold S. __ 

Saylor, Ben H. 

Saylor, Deward 

Saylor, Emanuel ._ 
Scharfenberger, Irv. 
Schellhase, David -- 
Sehlich. Paul E. ___ 
Sehmitt, Karl F. _. 
Schutz, John J., Jr. 

Scott, Luther 

Scott. W. L. 

Seale. Frank E. 

Seale, William E. __ 

Selvev, Curt 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. __ 

Sheets, William 

Showalter, John 

Shumate, Roy V. __ 
Sinclair, George H. 
Sizemore, Dewey __ 

Skinner, Ernest 

Sloan, Wally 

Smith, Edgar J. ___ 

Smith, J. E. 

Smith, Walter K. ._ 

Snook, Patrick 

Spaulding, Stan 

Steele, Charles S. -- 
Stephenson, HaiTy _ 
Stevens, William D. 
Stewart, T. Herbert 

Stone, Clifton 

Stone, Robert E. ._ 

Strimer, Albert 

Strong, Ai-nett 

Stump, Bennett 

Sullivan, Don C. 

Swinford, John 

Tackett, Jav 

Taylor, D. C. 

Taylor, Den.nis H. __ 
Thaipe, Robert L. ._ 



Excel. 

1 
3 
6 
3 

7 



19 

10 
2 
1 

10 
2 
3 
1 


13 
5 


1 
1 
1 

14 
7 
7 

1 
1 
8 
1 
5 

1 
5 
4 




Good 


Fair 


1 





14 


1 


6 


1 


4 


1 








' 12 


1 


9 


1 


1 


1 


10 





12 


11 


' 2 


1 


5 





! 4 


1 


5 





' 3 





5 





■ 9 





6 





4 











5 





3 





7 


1 


4 


1 1 


1 


1 


13 


2 1 


2 


2 1 


' 1 





1 3 





5 


1 





1 








6 





11 





' 13 





6 








1 








16 


2 








! 3 





1 











3 





2 


1 


2 


1 



Poor NAME 

Thomas, Frank M. 

Thompson, Jack 

Thompson, Jack F., Jr. __ 

Thompson, Ralph 

Thurman, J. W. 

Trautwein, Jim 

Treas, Joe W. 

Troutman, Bill 

Trunzo, Nicholas P. 

1 Vance, Wendell 

Vankirk. Alvia S. 

VanMeter, David G. 

Van Meter, John W., Jr. _ 

1 ^'arner, Ray 

Vennari, Paul 

Vennell, Robert H. 

1 ^^inciguerra, Philip 

Waide, Harry D. 

Walker, Paul R. 

Wanchic, Nicholas 

1 Watson, Ronald L. 

Watts, Shirley R. 

Weaver, Ray 

Weber, David 

Weisbrodt, Paul E. 

1 Welch, Tom 

Werkowitz, Jack 

Wheeler, James H. 

White, Harlie, Jr. 

Wigginton, Al, Sr. 

Wilkerson, Benjamin P. _ 

Williams, Bert 

Williams, James H 

Williams, Reid V. 

Williams, Roy E. 

Willis, Donald A. 

Wilson, John R. 

Wilson, John Pope 

Winfrey, Shelby 

Wise, Billy V. 

1 Wise, Jack 

Wittenburg, Howard 

Womack, William H. 

Wurtz, Emil 

Zimmer, Thomas W. 





Excel. 


14 
18 

16 

10 
3 
1 

6 
2 
6 
6 
1 
1 

2 
21 
13 

8 
1 
2 
4 
1 

3 
5 

1 

1 
4 
14 
1 
8 
2 
7 
6 
9 

6 





Good 


Fair 


1 2 


2 1 


1 12 


! 


1 16 


I 


3 


1 


8 


! 


1 3 


1 


1 7 


1 





1 1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


8 


1 I 


1 9 


3 j 


1 9 


1 


i 11 


1 ! 


1 


I 


1 


I 


6 


1 


6 


1 ' 


1 7 





10 


2 1 


3 


1 


I 11 


2 ! 


7 


1 I 


9 


1 


3 


2 


6 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


3 


1 1 


! 


2 


2 I 


1 





3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 2 





4 


1 


4 


t 


1 9 


1 


3 


1 i 


1 


! 


7 





4 





1 






Poor 
1 

3 


1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 






1 





1 














3 










Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools — 1960 



SCHOOL 

Anderson 

.•\shland 

Austin-Tracy 

Attucks 

liarbourville 

Hardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Black Star 

Boone County 

BowlinB Green 

Bryan Station 

Buckhorn 

Buritin 

Butler 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) .. 
Campbellsville 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 


















COACH 




OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


E 


G P 


P 


E G F P 


E 


G F 


P 


K 


G F 


21 


11 


1 


2 


25 


10 








20 


11 


4 





22 


9 


4 


:t3 


2 


1 





32 


3 








31 


4 


1 





32 


4 





22 


6 








22 


6 








19 


8 


1 





21 


6 


1 


10 


6 


2 





10 


7 








11 


5 








12 


5 





17 


4 








18 


3 








18 


2 


1 





19 


1 


1 


29 


2 


2 





28 


S 








28 


4 


1 





22 


10 


2 


6 


1 








4 


3 








2 


5 








4 


3 





19 


7 








23 


3 








24 


2 








23 


3 





24 


6 








25 


h 








22 


8 








23 


7 





2» 


1 




1 


32 


2 








29 


4 








28 


4 


2 


31 


5 







32 


4 


1 





29 


fi 








30 


6 





20 


4 







32 


2 








21 


2 


1 





18 


4 


2 


10 


6 







14 


2 








8 


7 


1 





11 


5 





21 


3 







22 


1 


1 





22 


1 


1 





17 


3 


3 


.30 


6 




2 


32 


h 


2 


1 


31 


8 


1 





27 


10 





52 


2 







61 


2 








45 


» 





1 


4fi 








23 


2 




2 


25 


3 








25 


2 


1 


1 


22 


4 


1 


11 










11 


U 








11 





1 





8 


2 


1 


10 










8 


2 








7 


3 








B 


4 





38 


8 







89 


6 


3 





37 











38 


7 


2 


23 


8 







28 


4 








23 


6 


2 


1 


23 


6 


1 


23 


11 








24 


HI 








23 


n 








Z4 


10 





30 


3 








24 


8 


1 





23 


9 


1 





25 


8 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Page Nine 



SCHOOL 
Camp Dick Robinson 
Carlisle 

Catholic Country Day 
Catlettsburg 



Central 

Clark County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Cynthii 



ille 



Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs Memorial . 

Dixie Heights 

Douglass (Henderson ) _. 

Douglass, (Murray) 

DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Eastern 

East Main St. (Lynch) . 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fail-dale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

J. M. Atherton 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Ky. Military Institute . 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

Lincoln i Franklin) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln (Stanford) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lin. Rid 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison-Model 

Madison ville 

Male 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. _ 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mount Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Oldham County 

Old Ky. Home 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 



4 








6 


4 





2 








34 

















27 








7 


1 


1 


27 


7 





2 








23 


3 





23 


1 


1 


20 


26 


1 


7 








31 


8 





11 


3 





36 


6 





6 








26 


7 





1 4 


X 


1 


32 


(1 





1 








31 


2 





4 








29 


4 





1 7 








26 


7 





1 10 








24 


10 





16 


2 


I 


39 


12 





1 1 








27 


3 





9 


1 





30 


9 





! 5 


4 


1 


16 


6 


1 


1 * 


2 





4 


2 





1 2 


1 





17 


4 





\ 11 


6 


1 


48 


6 


3 


1 5 








35 


5 





5 


1 





37 


5 





6 








42 


2 





6 








30 


7 





2 








26 


1 





5 








16 


4 





4 








25 


1 





1 5 








35 


5 





1 8 


4 


1 


30 


5 


1 


1 7 








37 


3 





1 








33 


1 





i 4 


1 





33 


3 


1 


1 6 





1 


22 


6 





1 6 


H 


5 


28 


5 


1 


1 2 








40 








1 1 


1 





23 


(1 





1 6 








23 


4 





1 8 


1 





28 


6 





1 7 


3 


2 


25 


9 





1 1 








23 








1 








25 








1 5 








29 


fi 





1 5 


1 





26 


5 





1 


2 





18 





1 










29 


7 





14 


2 


3 


25 


11 


2 


7 


3 


1 


29 


4 





2 


1 


1 


42 


3 





5 








17 


4 





5 


3 


3 


23 


5 





8 


1 





27 


6 





2 








34 








2 


3 





30 


7 





11 


2 


1 


34 


11 





2 








27 


3 





5 


2 





33 


4 


1 


2 








29 


3 





4 


1 





32 


3 





4 





4. 


39 


4 





2 


1 





26 


4 





7 


3 


2 


25 


7 


3 


4 


2 





25 


5 


1 


3 


1 


2 


29 


1 





3 


4 





24 


4 





3 








10 


4 





1 5 








14 


3 





1 1 








3 


1 





1 11 


3 





15 


12 


1 


11 








24 


11 








1 





37 


3 


1 


9 








21 


11 





7 








28 


8 














22 








4 


2 





22 


6 


1 


8 


2 


1 


28 


(1 





3 


2 





20 


2 


1 


8 








27 


7 





15 








27 


11 





3 








34 


3 





3 








32 








3 








32 


2 





2 








25 


3 





6 


3 





32 


2 





6 








32 


7 





14 


2 


1 


34 


8 





7 


1 


1 


40 


8 





5 








15 


3 





8 








39 


fi 





13 


2 





27 


10 


4 


5 








29 


6 





6 


2 





28 








5 


1 





29 


A 





7 








22 


» 





8 








19 


7 





8 


1 


1 


38 


1 





1 








11 


2 





4 


1 





33 


7 





11 


5 


1 


27 


9 


2 


i 


1 





23 


1 








CROWD 






TEAM 


h; 


G 


F 


H 


E 


G 


F 


fi 


4 








5 


5 





2H 


6 


1 





29 


6 


1 


26 


4 








26 


4 





23 


10 


1 


1 


24 


9 


2 


17 


7 








18 


27 


4 


17 


32 








21 


4 


1 


32 


8 


2 





33 


8 





3(1 


7 





1 


35 


X 





14 


12 


4 


4 


13 


10 


7 


27 


4 








26 


7 


3 


32 


2 








31 


4 





25 


5 


1 





26 


4 


2 


24 


9 








23 


10 





23 


9 


1 


1 


22 


9 


2 


32 


19 








35 


17 





26 


1 


3 


II 


28 


1 


1 


31 


8 








31 


8 


1 


14 


9 





1 


12 


9 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1) 


4 


4 





13 


7 








13 


7 





46 


9 


2 


1 


45 


10 


1 


31 


9 





1 


36 


5 


1 


36 


6 


1 





39 


4 





42 


1 





1 


40 


4 





33 


4 








34 


2 





22 


4 


1 


II 


24 


3 





16 


4 








14 


6 





24 


1 


1 





21 


3 


2 


32 


6 


2 


II 


32 


8 





2K 


8 








28 


6 


1 


34 


6 





II 


35 


5 





33 


1 





1 


28 


4 


3 


29 


8 





II 


30 


6 





27 


7 


2 





19 


8 


2 


27 


5 


2 





24 


fi 


4 


34 


5 


1 





37 


3 





19 


3 





1 


21 


2 





19 


7 








19 


7 


1 


«3 


8 


3 


11 


20 


8 


2 


26 


7 


1 


1 


27 


7 


1 


22 


1 








20 


3 





23 


1 


1 





22 


2 


1 


25 


7 


3 


1 


25 


9 


2 


24 


5 


2 





27 


4 





IS 





1 





15 


2 


2 


22 


13 


1 


II 


20 


15 


1 


21 


15 


1 





16 


17 


2 


27 


6 








26 


7 





37 


6 





1 


38 


5 





12 


8 


1 





10 


11 





14 


11 


1 


2 


16 


7 


3 


26 


7 








27 


6 





29 


4 








31 


2 





311 


7 





II 


27 


9 




31 


10 


4 


1 


34 


11 




27 


2 


1 





26 


2 




311 


6 


3 


II 


30 


5 




28 


4 








29 


3 




32 


4 








31 


3 




39 


4 








38 


4 




24 


7 








25 


6 




21 


9 


5 


1 


26 


8 




20 


7 


1 


3 


26 


4 




27 


2 


1 


II 


25 


1 




23 


4 


1 


II 


17 


4 




K 


3 


2 





7 


6 




H 


8 





II 


10 


7 




2 


2 








2 


2 




12 


16 








11 


17 




27 


8 








21 


13 




3S 


3 





1 


38 


3 




18 


11 


3 





20 


9 




25 


11 








27 


8 




25 


2 








19 


3 




20 


7 


1 


1 


19 


9 




25 


4 


1 





23 


6 




13 


8 


1 


1 


17 


4 




29 


6 





II 


29 


fi 




23 


13 


2 





19 


13 




31 


5 





II 


32 


4 




311 


6 








30 


fi 




29 


3 


2 


II 


26 


7 




18 


11 





II 


23 


fi 





27 


6 


2 





27 


5 


3 


32 


7 








32 


4 


2 


31 


10 


1 


II 


27 


13 





38 


9 


2 





40 








8 


9 


1 


2 


12 


15 





38 


6 


1 


II 


37 


X 





28 


13 





II 


28 


12 


1 


25 


10 





II 


29 


fi 





24 


3 








22 


3 


3 


27 


8 








30 


5 





21 


10 





(1 


17 


4 





17 


8 


1 





15 


7 


4 


37 


1 


1 


fl 


35 


3 


1 


6 


7 








3 


7 


3 


32 


7 


1 


II 


32 


6 


2 


16 


15 


6 


4 


19 


15 


4 


21 


3 








20 


3 


1 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosenwald (Harlan) . 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph 

St. Xavier 

Seneca 

Sh; 



Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield — 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill __. 
Tompkinsville . 
Trigg County . 



uty 



Valley 

Versailles 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Warren County 

Western ( Owensboro) 

Western (Paris I 

West Main (Lynch I __ 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wurtland 















1 

















4 


1 


1 








4 


2 





n 











2 


2 





















BASEBALL RULINGS 

(Continueei from Page Three) 
Ruling — Rl is out and B2 remains on 2nd. (8-1-1-e) 

17. Play — There is 1 out when Bl doubles to deep 
centerfield but he misses 1st base. Fl assumes set 
position and, before he commits himself to pitch, 1st 
baseman requests ball so he may appeal missing of 
1st base. Fl becomes befuddled and commits a balk in 
attempting to throw ball to F3. After Bl is awarded 
3rd base, can an appeal be allowed after ball next be- 
comes alive. 

Ruling — Yes, provided appeal is made prior to time 
of next pitch. (2-9-1; 2-11-6) 

18. Play — There is 1 out and B2 hits a potential 
triple but misses 2nd base. Fl assumes his set position 
stance and, before he commits himself to pitch, F4 
requests ball to make an appeal at 2nd base. Fl is 
confused and hesitates so that he commits a balk but 
goes through with the pitch. B3 hits: (a) a home run 
inside the park; (b) a foul fly in back of home plate 
which is caught; (c) a fair line diive which hits Rl 
on the arm, whose feet are on foul ground. Rl and B3 
each advance one base on the play. 

Ruling — In (a), both Rl and B3 each advanced a 
minimum of one base, thus the balk penalty is ignored. 
The pitch to B3. which he hit for a home run, is con- 
sidered a pitch. Therefore, the appeal is too late to be 
allowed. In (b) and (c), both Rl and B3 did not each 
advance a minimum of one base, therefore, the balk 
penalty is applied by advancing Rl one base. B3 re- 
mains at bat with the count what it was prior to 
pitch which immediately followed balk. In (b) and (c), 
the ball becomes dead. After it legally becomes alive, 
it would be permissible for the team in the field to 
make an appeal play on Rl, because, according to rule, 



the time of the next pitch after Rl's failure to touch 
2nd has not occurred. (2-9-1; 2-11-6) 

GUEST EDITORIALS 

(Continued from Page Five) 
than (io their fellows. Such reports can hard- 
ly help but worry parents and may even 
cause athletes some concern, particularly as 
they grow older. To get at the facts, investi- 
grators have studied the life records of 
athletes vs. non-athletes. 

The earliest of these studies, dealing with 
former oarsmen, indicated that the athletes 
lived about two years longer, on the average, 
than the rest of the population. Late studies, 
covering participants in a variety of college 
sports, here and abroad, gave similar ad- 
vantages to the athletes. Studies of foi-mer 
high school basketball players also yielded 
comparable results. All of these studies were 
criticized, however, because the athletes 
were compared with the general population 
rather than with non-athletes in the college 
group. 

To test the validity of these criticisms, 
follow-up studies of athletes and non-athletes 
in comparable college groups have been 
made. The findings are that athletes live 
about the same number of years, on the aver- 
age, as their college contemporaries. This 
means that college students (athletes and 
non-athletes) are a select group with an 
average margin in longevity of about two 
years over the general population. 

In these careful studies, no significant 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



Page Eleven 



difference showed up in the causes of death, 
or in other words, the incidence of the death- 
dealing diseases. There does appear to be a 
difference, however, in the number of acci- 
dental deaths, with these running somewhat 
higher among the athletes. 

When a well-known athlete dies from a 
heart attack, while comparatively young, it 
naturally attracts a great deal of attention. 
On the other hand, the death of a person less 
well known under similar circumstances, ex- 
cept for relatives and friends, might hardly 
be noted. This emphasizes how invalid it is 
to draw conclusions from one or a few cases. 

On a scientific statistical basis, the truth 
is that athletes live longer, on the average, 
than the general population and just as long 
as their college classmates. In fact, barring 
accidents, they may have a slight edge over 
their fellows, in average life expectancy. 
(Pertinent references may be found in the 
Research Quarterly, 31:2 (May 1960) pp. 
280-285). 

— National Federation and the A.M.A. 



Basketball Coaches' Creed 

Mr. George R. Edwards, the former head 
basketball coach at the University of 
Missouri and a charter member of the Na- 
tional Basketball Coaches Association, ex- 
plains how the creed came to be written. A 
desire of coaches to obtain more uniform 
interpretation of playing rules led, in 1929, to 
the formation of the National Basketball 
Coaches Association. Right from the start 
the subject of ethical behavior became im- 
portant in the discussions of that group. 
Most of the comments in the discussions 
were based on actions which should not be 
permitted. As chairman of the committee on 
ethics in 1932, Mr. Edwards was delegated 
the responsibility of preparing a statement 
on the beliefs of the Association. Correspon- 
dence with about twenty nationally known 
coaches concerning the content and form of 
the creed prompted him to express it in a 
positive rather than negative form. 

The creed was adopted at the convention 
in 1932 and has appeared at least once a 
year in The National Basektball Coaches 
Association Bulletin. 

I BELIEVE that bas:.etball has an im- 
portant place in the general educational 
scheme and pledge myself to cooperate with 
others in the field of education to so admin- 
ister it that its value never will be question- 
ed. 



I BELIEVE that other coaches of this 
sport are as earnest in its protection as I am, 
and I will do all in my power to further their 
endeavors. 

I BELIEVE that mv own actions should 
be so regulated at all times that I will be a 
credit to the profession. 

I BELIEVE that the members of the 
National Basketball Committee are capably 
expressing the rules of the game, and I will 
abide bv these rules in both spirit and letter. 

I BELIEVE in the exercise of all the 
patience, tolerance, snd diplomacy at my 
command in my relations with all players, co- 
workers, p-ame officials and spectators. 

I BELIEVE that the proper administra- 
tion of this sport offers an effective labora- 
tory method to develop in its adherents high 
ideals of sportsmanship ; qualities of cooper- 
ation, courage, unselfishness and self-con- 
trol; desires for clean, healthful living; and 
respect for wise discipline and authority. 

I BELIEVE that these admirable charac- 
teristics, properly instilled by me through 
teaching and demonstration, will have a long 
carryover and will aid each one connected 
with the sport to become a better citizen. 

I BELIEVE in and will support all rea- 
sonable moves to improve athletic conditions, 
to provide for adequate enuipment and to 
promote the welfare of an increased number 
of participants. — Missouri H.S.A. Journal 



A Current Problem 

The power and infuence of sports on the 
national and internationl scene from time 
to time needs an evaluation based on the 
aims and purposes of those of us operating 
at the gras3-root level of athletics through 
our state high school athletic organizations. 

It goes without question that good or poor 
attitudes toward the much-desired sacrifices 
in athletics are instilled while the athlete is 
in his grade school or high school days. Im- 
pressions formed during these youthful 
years .eo far toward determining the ulti- 
mate viewpoint an athlete will have toward 
the rights and wrongs of the sports par- 
ticipant. 

Collegiate and professional sporting events 
on television which resort to sponsorship by 
the tobacco and beer industries in effect are 
defeating the objectives set forth by the 
high school coach. It is inconceivable that 
the relationship of tobacco and alcohol can 
have anything but a detrimental effect on 
the high school athlete. Furthermore, the 
pre-high school boy who is at the most im- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 
FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 
Phone Triangle .3-3623 

Distributors of: 



Spanjian (Eastern Ky. only) 

Southern 

Nocona 

\\ilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 

Adidas Track Shoes. State of Ky. 



Bike 

Cramer 

Slim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin .Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gvm Suits 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stoklev 



-397' 



Dick Wallace 



l)ressionable stage of his development will 
be more difficult to convince of the necessary 
training habits and sacrifices which are an 
intricate part of truly being an athlete. 

It appears that unless an effort is made to 
show cause why such commercials advertis- 
ing beer or showing players in uniform ad- 
vocating a cigarette should be eliminated, 
high school athletic programs will suffer. 
Certainly there are many industries which 
would welcome the opportunity to advertise 
through the medium of college and profes- 
sional sports and which would not have such 
an adverse effect on our prospective citizens 
• — the pre-high school and high school ath- 
lete. 

There are some who would strongly con- 
tend that such suggestive advertising con- 
tributes to juvenile delinquency. However, 
most certain of all is the fact that the high 
school coach is fighting a difficult battle 
when such highly publicized and so widely 
viewed sports spectacles feature endorse- 
ment by an athlete of a product contradic- 
tory to good training habits. 

This is being written with the possibility 
that someone, somewhere, somehow might 
foresee the implications and take the neces- 



sary steps to help protect the ideals of ath- 
letics. If there is any truth in the concept 
that sacrifices and healthful training habits 
are an important phase of boy's gaining 
maturity as well as his becoming a good 
athlete, then the responsible agencies are 
the focal point of the possibility of correct- 
ing present practices. 

— E.xecutive Secretary John E. Roberts 
Wisconsin Int. Ath. Ass'n 

IN MEMORLVM 

WILLIAM G. LOPEZ, retii-ed Secretary of the Cali- 
fornia Interscholastic Federation, Los Ang'eles City 
Section, died the niorninR' of December K! after suffer- 
inc a heart attack foui- days earlier. He had attended 
man.v National Federation Annual and Football moet- 
ings during' hi.s active tenure as supervisor of athletics 
for the Los Ang'eles City Schools. ThrouR'hout the 
United States, he was well known as an efficient and 
progressive athletic administrator. 

Mr. Lopez's sports career began as a high school 
coach in Los Angeles in 1924. From 1933 until he re- 
tired in 19.58, he was supervisor of Los Angeles high 
school athletics. During his tenure the numbei' of high 
schools increased fi-om 12 schools in two leagues to .'57 
teams in six leagues. Over 15,000 boys were involved 
in the high school sports program. 

Mr. Lopez was a member of the .Southern California 
Committee foi' Ol.vmpic games, Boxing Commissioner 
for the Southern Section Amateur Athletic Union and 
Pi'csident of the Southern Califoi-nia Officials' Associa- 
tion. 



ANNOUNCING FOR ] 961-62 

STUDENT ACCIDENT COVERAGE 

ACCIDENTAL DEATH BENEFIT - $2,000 

OVERALL MAXIMUM EXPENSE - $8,000 

MAXIMUM DISMEMBERMENT - $8,000 

DEFERRED DENTAL AND TUTORING 
BENEFITS - EACH $500 MAXIMUM 

FOOTBALL COVERAGE 

BLANKET EXPENSE BENEFIT 
AVAILABLE WITHOUT DEDUCTIBLE 
COVERS SPRING PRACTICE 

Prompt And Fair Claim Service 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



*7/ie Kincfd&4^ Qo4nfus4i4f. 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8622 




Hiqh kho9l AfhMe 



ASHLAND HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION--1961 




(Left to Ri^ht) Front Row: Mgr. Cecil Thornbury, Quintin Callihan, Lonnie 
Castle. Second Row: Gene Smith, Jerry Daniels, Larry Conley, Bob Hilton, Harold 
Sargent, Steve Cram. Third Row : Coach Bob Wright, Dale Sexton, David Gray, 
Larry Fairchild, David Turpin, Ken Johnson, Bob Yancey, Ricky Pope. 



District Tournament Games Won 

Ashland 92-58 Raceland 

Ashland 109-71 Greenup 

Ashland 77-30 _. Holy Family 

Ashland 101-69 Russell 



Regional Tournament Games Won 



Ashland 95-62 

Ashland 97-49 

Ashland 90-73 



Russell 

Prichard 

Clark County 




<f' 



f 



OHicial Organ o/ the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL 19B1 I '^^ 



Dunbar — Runner-Up 
1961 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Ro« : William Cook, Gordon Jones, Edward Rawlings .John Finn, 
James Smith. Second Row: Mgr. James Craig, Ass't Coach N. L. Passmore, Thomas White, 
William Rawlings, Henry Davis, Robert Campbell, Austin Dumas, George Wilson, Phillip 
Rowe, Coach S. T. Roach, Mgr. Joe Harris. 



Wheelwright— Third Place Winner 
1961 State Basketball Tournament 




(I-ffl to Ki);ht) Kront Hoy. Coach Don Wallcn. ( harles Hall, Kenny Walker, Hob Sword, 
Danny Hall, Ronnie Hall, and Assistant Coach Ray Hrackett. Back Row: Gary Damron, Jim 
Rose. Major Hall, Bruce ISplcher, Lawrence Thornsbury, Clyde Bates, P'orrest L. Newsome. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 9 



APRIL 1961 



Sl.OO Per Yea; 



1961 Annual Meeting 

This issue of the ATHLETE went to 
press prior to the time of the annual meet- 
ing of the Association. The business meeting 
of the K.H.S.A.A. was scheduled to be held 
on Thursday, April 6, at 2:30 P.M., in the 
Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, Louis- 
ville, with the dinner meeting to follow at 
6:00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meet- 
ing was to be Prof. Morton Walker, faculty 
member of the University of Louisville and 
Past-President of the Louisville Board of 
Education. Presentation of the Game Guy 
Award was scheduled for the meeting. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1. of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following 
changes in the Constitution and By-I-aws 
were to be acted upon by the Delegate 
Assembly : 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that 
"nineteenth" be substituted for "twentieth" 
in By-Law 4. 

PROPOSAL n 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
fifth sentence of Article IV, Section 2-a, of 
the Constitution be amended to read as fol- 
lows: "Nominations for membership on the 
Board of Control, signed by five principals 
of the section, shall be in the hands of the 
Commissioner, for sections that elect dur- 
ing the year, not later than midnight, Janu- 
ary 31." (Clarification) 

PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
following be substituted for the last sentence 
of Article IV, Section 2-a, of the Constitu- 
tion: "At the organization meeting in July, 
the members of the Board of Control shall 
elect from their membership a President and 
Vice-President to serve for one year. They 
shall not be eligible to serve for more than 
two one-year terms in succession." 
PROPOSAL IV 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
following be repealed: Article IV, Section 
3-C-8; Article IV, Section 3-d-4 (Clarifica- 
tion) ; and By-Law 36. 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



NEW BOARD MEMBER ELECTED 




Don R. Rawlings 

Prin. Don R. Rawlings of the Danville 
High School will represent Section 6 on the 
Board of Control for a four-year period, be- 
ginning July 1, 196L Mr. Rawlings will be 
a new member of the Board, replacing Prin. 
W. B. Jones of Somerset, who was not 
eligible for re-election after having served 
two successive terms. 

Don R. Rawlings was born in London, 
Kentucky. He attended the London City 
Schools and graduated from London High 
School. He served in the United States Navy 
for three years during World War II. Upon 
his discharge, he attended Sue Bennett Col- 
lege at London. He then transfen-ed to 
Eastern Kentucky State College from which 
he was graduated in 1949. In 1951, he re- 
ceived the Master of Arts Degree from the 
University of Kentucky. He has been prin- 
cipal of Danville High School for the past 
seven years. 

Mr. Rawlinp-s is married to the former 
Miss Irene Greer of London, and they have 
two sons, Gary Don, who is nine years old, 
and Kevin Ray, who is six. A member of 
the Lexington Avenue Baptist Church of 
Danville, Mr. Rawlings also belongs to the 
various education associations. He is im- 
mediate past-president of the Danville 
Kiwanis Club. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



APRIL, 1961 



AOL. XXIII— NO. 9 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 



Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Louis Litchfield (1967-61). Marion 

Vice-President. W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1958-621. Franklin: Jack Dawson 
I1958-B2). Ixiiisville: Robert P. Forsythe (1959-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. '.illaspie (1959-63). Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(U"i0-64), Pa ntsvillc: Cecil A. Thornton il960-i;4l Harlan. 



Subscrii 



Rates SI. 00 Per Ye 



Jrom the Commisslonei s Cyffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1960-61 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligribility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established twelve track 
regions for 1961. The scheduled date for the regional 
meets is May 12-13. Only first and second place winners 
in the regions will qualify for the State Meet. Sites 
of the meets are Murray, Daviess County, Bowling 
Oreen, Ft. Knox, Louisville (Bellarmine College), 
Louisville (Shawnee), Lexington, Bellevue, Danville, 
Barbourville, Elkhorn City, Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is as follows: 

Murray Region — Caldwell County, Calloway 

County, Christian County, Farmington, Fulton, Hop- 

kinsville, Mayfield, Murray, Murray College, South 

Marshall, Tilghman, Trigg County. 

Daviess County Region — Attucks, Calhoun, Crit- 
tenden County, Daviess County, Douglass (Hender- 
son), Hawesville, Henderson, Henderson County, 
Madisonville, Morganfield, Owensboro, Providence, 
Rosenwald (Providence), Sturgis, Sacramento, Slaugh- 
ters. 

Bowling Green Region — Austin Tracy, Bowling 
Green, Caverna, College, Cub Run, Franklin- Simpson, 
Gamaliel, Glasgow, Guthrie, High Street, Hi.seville, 
Lincoln (Franklin), Metcalfe County, Park City, 
Russellville, Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, Warren 
County. 

Ft. Knox Region — Campbellsville, Durham (Camp- 
bellsville), Elizabethtown, Ft. Knox, Glendale, Greens- 
burg, Howevalley, I.aRue County, Meade County, 
Rineyville, Vine Grove, Taylor County. 

Bellarniine Region — Butler, Durrett, Eastern, 
Fairdalc, Fern Creek, Henry Central, Kentucky 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky May 19-20 
(Time is Eastern Standard Time) 
FRIDAY 

3:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
from each heat qualify for Finals; Shot Put and Pole 
Vault, Finals. 

3:20 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

3:35 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:05 P.M. — 440 Ya'-d Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:30 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
from each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:50 P.M.— 880 Yard Run (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:15 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P.M. — Mile Relay (4 heats), 2 from each heat 
qualify for Finals. 
SATURDAY 

1:00 P.M. — High Jump, Discus, and Broad Jump. 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.— Mile Run 

2:45 P.M.— «80 Yard Relay 

3:00 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M.— Mile Relay 

Military Institute, Lincoln Institute, Louisville Country 
Day, Oldham County, Pleasure Ridge Park, Seneca, 
Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Louisville Region — .\therton, Ce.otial, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Lexington Region — Anderson, Bourbon County, 
Berea, Bryan Station, Carlisle, Clark County, Dunbar, 
Frankfort, Franklin County, Georgetown, Harrods- 
burg, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, Madi- 
son Central, Madison-Model, Midway, Millersburg 
Military Inst., Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, 
Paris, Shelbyville, Paris Western, Shelby County, Scott 
County, Stanford, University, Versailles. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Campbell County, Carrollton, Dayton, Deming 
(Mt. Olivet), Dixie Heights, Grant County, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport, Newpoit Catholic, 
Walton Verona, Simon Kenton, William Grant. 

Danville IJegion ■ — Bardstown, Bate, Bloomfield, 
Burgin, Camp Dick Robinson, Danville, Old Kentucky 
Home, Paiksville, Periyville, Rosenwald (Lebanon), 
St. Charles (Lebanon), St. Catherine (New Haven), 
St. Joseph, Springfield, Wayne County. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Benham, Black Stai-, Clay County, Corbin, East Ben- 
ham, Evaits, Hall, Harlan, Hazel Green (East Bern- 
stadt), Knox Central, Lily, London, Lone Jack, Loyall, 
McCreary County, Middlesboro, Pineville, Red Bird, 
Rosenwald (Barbourville), Rosenwald (Harlan), Somer- 
set, Wallins, West Main (Lynch). 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



Page Three 



Elkhorn City Region — Belfiy ,Dunham, Elkhoin 
City, Flemina'-Xeon, Hazard, Jenkins, Johns Creek, 
M. C. Napier, Paintsville, Pikeville, Prestansburo-, 
Virde, Whitesburg'. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Catlettsburg, Meade 
Memorial, Morgan County, Raceland, Russell, Wurt- 
land, Warfield. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENTS— BOYS 

On May 8 seven regional tournaments will be held. 
The sites are Bowling Green, Jefferson County, Louis- 
ville, North Lexington, South Lexington, Bellevue, and 
Fort Knox. The State Tennis Tournament will be held 
in Louisville on May 15-16. The assignment of schools 
by regions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Attucks, Bowling Green, 
Cavema, College, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Green- 
ville, Hopkinsville, Russellville, Memorial (Hardyville), 
Tompkinsville, Warren County. 

Jefferson County Region — Durrett, Eastern, Ken- 
tucky Military Inst., Louisville County Day, Seneca, 
Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener, Fairdale, Fern 
Creek. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
Flaget, Shawnee, St. Xavier. 

North Lexington Region — Ashland, FVanklin Coun- 
ty, Henry Clay, Millersburg Military Institute, Paris, 
Camargo, Shelbyville. 

South Lexington Region — Foundation, Harlan, 
Hazel Green, Lafayette, Paintsville, University, 
Somerset, Danville, Whitesburg. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Dayton, 
Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport Catholic, 
Simon-Kenton. 

Fort Knox Region — Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort 
Knox, Greensburg, LaRue County, Owensboro, Doug- 
lass (Henderson), St. Joseph. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENTS— GIRLS 

Six regional tournaments have been set up for girls 
tennis. These tournaments will be held on May 5-6 at 
Bowling Green, Louisville, Bellevue, Murray, Jeffer- 
son County, and Lexington. The State Girls Tennis 
Tournament will be held at Shavwiee Park in Louis- 
ville on May 12-13. The assignment of schools by re- 
gions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, College, 
Foit Knox, Franklin- Simpson, Greensburg, Owensboro, 
Warren County, Vine Grove. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Dayton, 
Highlands, Ludlow. 

Murray Region — Attucks, Douglass (Henderson), 
Murray, Hopkinsville, Madisonville. 

Jefferson County Region — Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Southern, Waggener. 

Lexington Region — Camargo, Danville, Franklin 
County, Hazel Green (East Bernstadt), Henry Clay, 
Montgomery County, Paris, Somerset, Shelbyville. 

GOLF TOURNAMENTS 

Eight regional tournaments have been set up in 
golf. These tournaments will be held on May 17 at 
Princeton, Bowling Green, Louisville, Jefferson County, 
Paris, Paintsville, Middlesboro, Covington. The State 
Golf Toui'nanient will be held at Fort Knox on May 
23-24. The assignment of schools by regions is as 
follows: 

Princeton Region — Caldwell County, Daviess 
County, Fulton, Greenville, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, 



Murray, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, North 
Marshall, Paducah Tilghman, Providence. 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowling 
Green, College, Elizabethtown, Ft. Knox, Franklin- 
Simpson, Glasgow, Hartford, High Street, Hiseville, 
Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, Russellville, Scottsville. 
St. Joseph (Bardstown), Vine Grove, Warren County. 

Louisville Region — DeSales, Flaget, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee, J. M. Atherton. 

Jefferson County Region — Butler, Durrett, East- 
ern, Fairdale, Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Inst.. 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Louisville Country Day, Oldham 
County, Owen County, Seneca, Southern, Shelbyville, 
Trinity, Waggener, Valley. 

Paris Region — Berea Foundation, Clark County. 
Danville, Frankfort, Franklin County, Henry Clay. 
Irvine, Lafayette, Lebanon, Madison-Model, Paris, 
Millersburg Military Institute, Springfield, St. 
Augustine, University. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Fairview, Hazard. 
Paintsville, Pikeville, Prestonsburg. 

Middlesboro Region — • Corbin, Cumberland, East 
Main Street, Hall, McCreary County, Middlesboro. 
Somerset. 

Covington Region — Beechwood, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Holy 
Cross, Lloyd, Maysville, St. Henry, St. Patrick, St. 
Thomas, Newport, Newport Catholic. 

BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district baseball tournaments are scheduled 
to be held on May 9-11. The dates should be set by the 
district tournament managers, and should represent 
the thinking of the majority of principals or coaches 
in the district involved. The regional tournaments will 
be held on May 25-26, and the State Baseball Tourna- 
ment is scheduled to be played at the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, on June 7-8. The assignment of 
schools to the various districts and regions is as 
follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

Christian County District — Attucks, Christian 
County, Hopkinsville, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton, Calloway County, Mur- 
ray, Murray College, North Marshall, South Marshall. 

Paducah District — Ballard, Heath, Reidland, St. 
John (Paducah), St. Mary (Paducah), Tilghman. 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Cuba, Fulton, 
Fulton County, Hickman County, Lowes, Mayfield, 
Symsonia. 

Livingston Central District — Caldwell County. 
Crittenden County, Fredonia, Livingston Central. 

OWENSBORO REGION 

Henderson County District — Douglass (Hender- 
son), Henderson, Henderson County, Holy Name, 
Morganfield, Sebree, St. Vincent, Sturgis. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, 
Frederick-Fraize, Irvington, Hawesville, Lewisport, 
Meade County. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Fordsville, 
Hartford. Horse Branch. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic, Western (Owensboro). 

Madisonville, District — Bremen, Calhoun, Earl- 
ington, Hanson. Livermore, Madisonville, Rosenwald 
(Madisonville), Sacramento, South Hopkins. 

Central City District — Central City, Drakesboro 
Community, Graham, Greenville, Hughes Kirk, 
Muhlenburg Central. 

GLASGOW REGION 
Warren County District — Bowling Green, Bristow, 
College. Franklin-Simpson, High Street, Lincoln 
(Franklin), North Warren, Richardsville, Warren 
County. 

Russellville District — Adairville, Clifty, Auburn, 
Guthrie. Lewisburg, Olmstead, Russellville, Todd 
County, Todd County Training. 

Glasgow District — Austin Tracy, Bunche, 
Gamaliel, Glasgow, Hiseville, Metcalfe County, Park 
City, Scottsville. Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, Clinton 
County. 

Caverna District — Caverna. Cub Run, LaRue 
County. Memorial (Hardyville). Munfordville. 

Leitchfield District — Butler County, Caneyville, 
Clarkson, Edmonson County, Leitchfield. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Camp- 
bellsville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. 
Charles, Rosenwald (Lebanon). Taylor County, St. 
Francis. 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloomfield, 
Frederickstown, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, 
St. Joseph, Shepherdsville, Springfield. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabeth- 
town Catholic, Ft. Knox, Glendale, Howevalley, Lynn- 
vale, Riney\'ille, Sonora, Vine Grove. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 
St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, Shawnee, 
St. Xavier. 

Manual District — Atherton, DeSales, Male, du- 
Pont Manual. 

Southern District — Butler, Durrett, Fairdale, 

FeiTi Creek, Pleasure Ridge Park, .Southern, Valley. 

Trinity District — Eastern, Catholic Country Day, 

Kentucky Military Inst., Louisville Country Day, 

Seneca, Trinity, Waggener. 

NEWPORT REGION 
St. Henry District — Beech wood, Boone County, 
Lloyd Memorial, Simon Kenton, St. Henry. 

Dixie Heights District — Covington Catholic, Dixie 
Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. 

Silver Grove District — Campbell County, High- 
lands, Silver Grove, St. Thomas. 

Grant County District — Falmouth, Grant County, 
Williamstown, Walton Verona. 

Newport District — Bellevue. Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic. 

Maysville District — Bracken County, Fleming 
County, Mason County, Maysville, St. Patrick, ToUes- 



boro, Vanceburg-Lewis County. 

LEXINGTON REGION 

\'er.sailles District — Anderson, Frankfort, Franklin 
County, Georgetown, Midway, Scott County, Versailles. 

Paris District — Bouibon County, Carlisle, CjTithi- 
ana. Harrison County, Millersburg Military Inst., 
Nicholas County, North Middletown, Paris, Western 
(Paris). 

Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp Dick 
Robinson, Danville, Forkland, Harrodsburg, Junction 
City, Lancaster, Mercer County, Parksville, Perry- 
ville. 

Crab Orchard District — Crab Orchard, Liberty, 
McKinney. Memorial (Waynesburg), Middleburg, Mt. 
Vernon, Paint Lick, Stanford. 

Carrollton District — CarroUton. Eminence. Henry 
Central, Gallatin County, Owen County, Trimble 
County. 

Lexington District — Bryan Station, Henry Clay, 
Jessamine County. Lafayette, Lexington Catholic. 

Shelby ville District — Lincoln In.stitute, Oldham 
County. Shelby County, Shelbyville, Taylorsville. 

Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, Founda- 
tion, Irvine, Madison Central, Madison-Model. 
MIDDLESBORO REGION 

Somerset District — Eubank, Ferguson, McCreary 
County. Monticello, Nancy, Pine Knot, Pulaski 
County. Russell County, Somerset. 

Hazel Green District — London, Lily, Hazel Green, 
Bush, Corbin, Clay County. 

Lynch District — Benham, Cumberland. East Ben- 
ham, East Main Street, Evarts. Hall .Harlan, Loyall, 
Pine Mountian. 

Lee County District — Annville, Lee County, Mc- 
Kee, Oneida, Owsley County, Powell County, Tyner, 
Wolfe County. 

Middlesboro District — Bai-bourville, Bell County, 
Henderson Settlement, Lincoln. Lone Jack, Middles- 
boro, Red Bird. 

Elkhorn City District — Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Fleming-Neon, John's Creek, Jenkins, Pikeville, 
Virgie. 

M. C. Napier District — Carr Creek, Dilce Combs, 
Hazard, Hindman, Leatherwood, Leslie County, M.C. 
Napier, Whitesburg. 

MOREHEAD REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cat- 
lettsburg, Fairview, Holy Family. 

McKell District — Greenup, McKell, Russell, South 
Portsmouth, Wui'tland. 

Mt. Sterling District — DuBois, Camargo, Clark 
County, Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling, Owings- 
ville. 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Carter, 
Hitchins, Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County. 

Paintsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Flat Gap, Inez, 
Louisa, Meade Memorial, Morgan County, Oil Springs, 
Paintsville, VanLear, Warfield. 

McDowell District — Auxier, McDowell, Prestons- 
burg, Wheelwright. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



Page Fiv« 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K.H.S.A.A. Building, Lexington, on Friday 
morning, March 17, 1961. The meeting was 
called to order by President Louis Litchfield 
at 9:00, with Board members W. H. Crow- 
dus. Jack Dawson, K. G. Gillaspie, W. B. 
Jones, Gran C. Teater, Cecil A. Thornton, 
and Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford present. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes of 
the January 28th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner i-eported the results of 
the recent balloting for Board membership 
in Sections 1 and 6, as follows: Section 1 — 
Joe P. Duke 19, Preston Holland 19, Frank B. 
Simpson 8 ; Section 6 — Don R. Rawlings 46, 
Joe Ohr 8, James E. Baker 5. There was a 
discussion concerning the method of break- 
ing the tie vote in Section 1. W. H, Crowdus 
moved, seconded by Gran C. Teater, that the 
name of Frank B. Simpson be dropped from 
the ballot, and that a second ballot be sent 
out to the principals in Section 1, listing the 
names of Joe P. Duke and Preston Holland, 
these ballots to be returned in ten days. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the sum 
of $150.22 had been received from member 
schools as contributions toward the Basket- 
ball Hall of Fame, and that the list of donors 
would appear in a subsequent issue of the 
ATHLETE. 

The Commissioner presented to the 
Board of Control for its consideration num- 
erous sanction requests for All-Star games. 
It was agreed that the only request which 
would be considered by the Board of Conti'ol 
at this meeting was that concerning sanc- 
tion of the Indiana-Kentucky All-Star basket- 
ball games for 1961. W. B. Jones, seconded 
by Jack Dawson, offered the following reso- 
lution which was carried unanimously: "Be 
it resolved that the K.H.S.A.A. Board of 
Control go on record as being opposed in 
principle to All-Star contests, but that, be- 
cause of plans already made for the Ken- 
tucky-Indiana basketball series of 1961, prior 
to the passage of the All-Star rule by the 
N.C.A.A., the Board approve this year's 
games, and that the National Federation be 
notified accordingly." 

There was a discussion of new proposals 
to be presented by the Board of Control to 
the forthcoming Delegate Assembly. The 



Commissioner was authorized to present the 
following proposals as Board proposals, on 
motion of W. B. Jones, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, the motion carrying unanimously : 

Proposal I — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that "nineteenth" be substituted for 
"twentieth" in By-Law 4. 

Proposal II — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the fifth sentence of Article IV, 
Section 2-a, of the Constitution be amended 
to read as follows: "Nominations for mem- 
bership on the Board of Control, signed by 
five principals of the section, shall be in the 
hands of the Commissioner, for sections that 
elect during the year, not later than mid- 
nig'ht, January 31." (Clarification) 

Proposal III — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the following be substituted for 
the last sentence of Article IV, Section 2-a, 
of the Constitution : "At the organization 
meeting in July, the members of the Board 
of Control shall elect from their membership 
a President and Vice-President to serve for 
one year. They shall not be eligible to serve 
for more than two one-year terms in suc- 
cession." 

Proposal IV — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the following be repealed : Article 
IV. Section 3-c-8; Article IV, Section 3-d-4 
(Clarification) ; and By-Law 36. 

Proposal V — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the third sentence of Article IV, 
Section 2-a, of the Constitution be amended 
to read as follows: "To be eligible for mem- 
bership on the Board of Control, one must be 
actively engaged in the teaching profession 
(teacher, administrator or supervisor) in his 
local section as a regular staff member in 
some official capacity, and must remain in 
some such similar capacity during the com- 
plete tenure of office." 

Proposal VI — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the fourth sentence of Article IV, 
Section 2-a, of the Constitution, be amended 
to read as follows: "Serving in a part-time 
capacity or on leave of absence or on sick 
leave in any of these capacities will term- 
inate the eligibility of the member, and the 
remaining members of the Board shall fill 
the vacancy within sixty days in the same 
manner as that prescribed for the regular 
election of Board members." (Clarification) 

The Commissioner presented a letter 
from Prin. R. L. Grider of the Bryan Station 
High School, recommending that action be 
taken by the K.H.S.A.A. looking toward the 
establishment of rifle marksmansihip as a 
minor sport. Accompanying the letter was 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

It was Bill Uavis, Game Guy of 1961, 
who was to be in the seat of honor at the 
banquet of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association at the Brown Hotel in 
Louisville on April 6. Game Guys may come 
and Game Guys may go, but this year's win- 
ner of The Flying Dutchman Award for 
overcoming the greatest handicap to engage 
in sports must go down in the record book 
as a "Man among men." 

This year's Game Guy is Bill Davis of 
Harrodsburg High School. Bill Endicott first 
brought this young fighter's accomplish- 
ments to the attention of The Flying Dutch- 
man saying, "It is always gratifying when 
people start talking about teen-age delin- 
(luency to bring up the name of a boy who 
would rather make a good tackle than drive 
a hot rod. Such a boy is Bill Davis, a guard 
on the Harrodsburg High School football 
team, who has been crippled since birth." Bill 
Smart, his principal, says, "Bill sets an ex- 
ample of courage which all of us may well 
pattern from." The Flying Dutchman says, 
"This kid has more determination per pound 
than anv football player he has ever heard 
of." 

Standing only 5 feet and 4 inches, and 
weighing only 115 pounds, Bill was born in 
1943 with the fibula missing from his lower 
leg. Nobody ever thought he would walk. 
Sin.e he put on a Harrodsburg football uni- 
form two seasons ago, he has never failed to 
come off the field the most respected line- 
man. This magnificent 115 pounder has al- 
ready asked Coach Blanton Collier if he can 
try out for football when he enrolls in the 
University. With one leg four inches shorter 
than the other. Bill was selected for honor- 
al)le mention on the All-State Eleven — Truly 
a Game Guy! 

The "Parade of Game Guys" is always a 
high-light of the Annual K.H.S.A.A. Dinner. 
Coaches, officials, and educators, are eager 
to pay tribute to the kid with a heart of a 
lion who refuses to be knocked out by a 
physical handicap and gets up from the floor 
to fight again. 

An Abou Ben Adhem Award has been 
called foi- by Coach Fairce Woods of Breath- 
itt High School for Dunbar High School. 
P'airce praises the courtesy and hospitality 
the school officials and fans e.xtended to his 
team. Lexington's Dunbar High School has 
been recommended many times and must 
truly be outstanding in the realm of sports- 
manship. This school alreafiy qualified for 




THE DUTCHMAN 

the award in the Year of 1960. Congratula- 
tions to the administration and coaching 
staff of this outstanding group of sports- 
men. 

Jimmy O'Sullivan, Editor of the Shelby 
Sentinel Newspaper, receives the Corn Cob 
Pijje of Honor Award for the unselfish ser- 
vice he is performing to promote recreation, 
and sports in the area served by his news- 
])aper. Jimmv is a sports enthusiast and is 
determined that as many boys and girls as 
])ossible be privileged to engage in recrea- 
tional sports. This chap is one of "Nature's 
Noblemen." 

Congratulations to the city of Paducah ! 
Joe Mitchell, promotion manager of the Pa- 
ducah Sun-Democrat, writes that the city is 
launching a l)rand-new recreation program 
with Art Seely as Sui)erintendent. The Fly- 
in? Dutchman worked with Paducah during 
the past two years helping to get a city pro- 
gram activated there. Art is a former coach 
in Southern Illinois and a basketball player 
of days gone by at Valley High School. 

Ashland's Ernie Chattin wins a Flying 
Dutchman award which has never been given 
before and will not be given again during 
this century. Because this personable Ken- 
tucky gentleman has attended every State 
Basketball Tournament for the past forty 
consecutive years and because no other man 
has a chance of tying his record during this 
century, he was [^resented a trophy pro- 
claiming him the State Tournament Fan of 
the Twentieth Century at 7:00 A. M., March 
18, before the semi-finals of the State 
Tournament in his room in the Kentuckian 
Hotel in Lexington. It was an unusual time 
to receive an award but Ernie is an unusual 
I'ellow. 

Outstanding coach-referee i-elationship 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE IfOR APRIL, 1961 



Page Nine 



is reflected in a letter written by Joe Jones 
of Louisville to Coach Norbert Raque. 
Official Joe wrote Norb a letter saying, "I 
feel that your constructive criticism has 
made me realize more fully the misunder- 
standings which often exist in the interpre- 
tation of rules by various officials." Norbert 
Raque is a pleasant fellow who knows how to 
offer constructive criticism. Basketball can 
use a lot of officials like Joe Jones who realize 
that men grow in stature by listening to 
constructive criticisms. 

Bill Varble insists that Maurice Stiff and 
Don Laubheimer are two young officials who 
deserve pats on the back. Regardless of rain, 
sleet, or snow, they will work J. V. basket- 
ball games without pay to help out schools 
needing officials and to gain experience, 
hoping some time to be prepared to officiate 
in varsity competition. More young officials 
s'hould copy a page from the book of these 
two "whistlers." 

"Scoop" Brown of Lexington compli- 
ments the last Flying Dutchman Article dis- 
cussing officiating. Scoop also wants The 
Flying Dutchman to clarify that kicking the 
basketball is only a violation when it is a 
positive act. There you are, officials — be sure 
that next season you only penalize intention- 
al kicking. 

Coach Bob Wright of the magnificent 
State Champions of Ashland started coach- 
ing at Vanceburg, but he left it for a while 
to operate a general store about three miles 
outside Wayne, West Virginia. Then he went 
back to his first love — and all Ashland is 
happy he did. 

There will be another lady basketball 
official in Kentucky next year. Mrs. Charlie 
(Ellen) Irwin, wife of the State Tournament 
official, will register for the 1961-62 season. 

Let's conclude with this thought: A man 
may question his wife's judgment in a lot 
of things, but never in her choice of a hus- 
band. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Five) 
material giving interesting facts about rifle 
clubs, with the question being asked, "Should 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion add rifle marksmanship to its lists of 
sponsored sports?" Board members suggest- 
ed that the Commissioner determine what 
state associations include rifle marksman- 
ship as a sponsored sport, and that a report 
on the feasibility of adding this sport to the 
K.H.S.A.A. program be made at a subsequent 
meeting of the Board of Control. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Cecil A. 



Thornton, that all bills of the Association 
beginning January 28, 1961, and ending 
March 16, 1961, be approved. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 

ATTENTION, PRINCIPALS! 

On March 1, 1961, the office of the Na- 
tional Federation of State High School Ath- 
letic Associations mailed a bulletin to State 
Association executive officers concerning the 
All-Star Game Rule. The rule had been adopt- 
ed by the N.C.A.A. at its meeting in Pitts- 
burgh on January 11, 1961. The rule, which 
became effective on adoption, is as follows: 
Excerpt from Article III 
The N.C.A.A. Constitution 

"Section 10. Principles Governing the 
Eligibility of Student-Athletes: An institu- 
tion shall not permit a student-athlete to 
represent it in intercollegiate athletic com- 
petition unless he meets the following re- 
quirements of eligibility : 

"(a) He must complete his seasons of 
participation within five calendar years from 
the beginning of the semester or quarter in 
which he first registered at a collegiate 
institution, time spent in the armed services 
or on compulsory church missions being ex- 
cepted. 

"(b) He shall be denied his first year of 
varsity athletic competition if, following his 
graduation from high school and before his 
enrollment in college, he was a member of a 
squad which engaged in any all-star football 
or basketball contest which was not spe- 
cifically approved by the appropriate state 
high school athletic association or, if inter- 
state, by the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations or all of 
the state high school athletic associations 
involved." 

Principals will want to bring this rule to 
the attention of all athletes in the school. 
Attention is called to the fact that, if a boy 
participates in an unsanctioned All-Star 
game in football or basketball and then en- 
rolls in a National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation institution at which freshmen are 
not eligible for varsity competition, the boy 
will not be eligible for intercollegiate varsity 
competition until he becomes a Junior. 



Page Ten THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1961 

1961 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winner, 72.9; For Losers, 59.1; Total for both 1.32 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B): .32.6 per game 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: 1.44 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per and T. for all games 735. Successful 66.6'; 

Total No. of Overtimes: 

Total No. Ending: 1st Overtime 

DATA COLLECTCED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense: 2.5 per game 

Average No. (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 6.1 per game 

Average No. (c) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.25 per game 

Average No. (d) Times 2 free throws were given unsuccessful 

thrower of field goal: 3.9 per game 

Average No. (e) Times time-out requested while ball was alive 

and in player possession : 46.6 per game 

Average No. (f) Official warnings about actionless game: per game 

Average No. (g) Technical fouls for actionless game: per game 

Average No. (h) Times per game there was basket interf. or goal tend: 

At player's own basket: per game 

At opponent's basket: 1.25 per game 

Average Over-all time from fii'st toss to final gun : 1 hour and 12 minutes 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 
Average No. (a) Times irregularity noted and corrected as 

provided b.v 10-7 Note: 1.56 per game 

Average No. (b) Times ball was returned to back court legally 

after jump at center: 1.07 per game 

Average No. (c) Times returning ball to back court resulted in violation: .31 per game 

Average No. (d) Times Off. handled ball for back court throw-in: 7 per game 

Average No. (e) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .75 per game 

Average No. (f) Violations of free throw rule 9-1: 1.25 per game 

Average No. (g) Times ball remained alive after unsuc. free throw: 10.3 per game 

(h) '", Times in (g) the free throw rebound was recovered by Defense: — 697' 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS — 1961 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the fifteen officials who participated in 
the recent State High School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified 
officials in the order of his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the 
coach receiving six points, the second official five points, etc. This is the method which has 
been used for many years by the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State 
Tournament officials. The schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are 
thev listed in the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 



ABC DEFG HIJ KL MNOP TOTAL 



:\Iilford Wells 




6 


6 


5 




2 


5 


5 


5 




6 








2 


4 


46 


Charlie Irwin 




1 


3 


2 


5 




4 


2 


3 








2 


1 


1 




24 


Warren Cooper 




5 




4 




6 








5 












3 


23 


Foster Meade 






5 


6 




1 


6 




2 




2 


1 










23 


Kenneth Arnold 










4 




2 






2 








6 


6 


1 


21 


Shelbv Winfrev 


5 


3 


















1 











6 


20 


Jack Wise 




4 
















6 










4 





19 


Rov Winchester 












4 




1 




3 








4 


5 




17 


Briscoe Inman 


3 




















3 


6 




2 






14 


Ed Mudd 
















6 










3 




Q 




12 


Joe Kinman 


















6 


1 


4 












11 


Bill Knight 










6 


3 






















9 


Bobby Flynn 




















4 








5 






y 


Ralph Mussman 


















4 




5 












9 


Don Sullivan 




2 


4 


3 


























9 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



Page Eleven 



Breathitt County— Fourth Place Winner 
1961 State Basketball Tournament 




(Le/> to Right) Front Ruw: Ogie Jones, Lois Taulbee, Judy Combs, Joyce Watts, Beverly 
Bath, Sallie Brown. Second Row: Reuben Spicer, .Mackie Turner, Tommy Turner, Granville 
Turner. Bill Chliders. Talbert Turner. Third Row: Coach Fairce Wojds, Mgr. 'Jerry Brewer, 
Hoy Marshall, Earl Stevens, Chester Roberts, Henry Combs, Granville Dealon, Brack Herald, 
Supt. Marie R. Turner, I'rin. Millard Tolliver 



1961 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

PROPOSAL V 
The Board of Control proposes that the 
third sentence of Article IV, Section 2-a, of 
the Constitution be amended to read as fol- 
lows: "To be eligible for membership on the 
Board of Control, one must be actively en- 
gaged in the teaching profession (teacher, 
administrator or supervisor) in his local sec- 
tion as a regular staff member in some 
official capacity, and must remain in some 
such similar capacity during the complete 
tenure of office." 

PROPOSAL VI 
The Board of Control proposes that the 
fourth sentence of Article IV, Section 2-a, 
of the Constitution, be amended to read as 
follows: "Serving in a part-time capacity or 
on leave of absence or on sick leave in any of 
these capacities will terminate the eligibility 
of the member, and the remaining members 
of the Board shall fill the vacancv within 
sixty days in the same manner as that pre- 
scribed for the regular election of Board 
members." (Clarification) 



PROPOSAL VII 
Prin. Vincent Zachem (Bardstown) pro- 
poses that the clause, "has paid the annual 
fee" shall be inserted after "has attended 
the clinic" in Section 4-b and Section 4-c of 
By-Law 29. (Clarification) 

PROPOSAL VIII 
The Very Reverend Alfred W. Stein- 
hauser. Principal (Trinity), proposes that 
By-Law 43 be amended by adding the follow- 
ing: "with the exception that, with the 
approval of the Commissioner, the Principal 
of an all-boys school may invite girl cheer- 
leader to represent his school." 

PROPOSAL IX 
Prin. Joe Ohr (Irvine), Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Kentucky Coaches Association, 
proposes that the first sentence of By-Law 
20, Section 1, be amended to read as follows: 
"No meet, tournament, post-season game, or 
all-star contest will be sanctioned by the 
Board of Control unless it is sponsored by a 
member school, conference, group of schools, 
or coaches' association, which shall have full 
control of planning, supervision, and disposi- 
tion of finances." 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1961 



GET YOUR STUDENT AND ATHLETIC ACCIDENT COVERAGE 
THROUGH: 

1. A Local Agent 

2. An Experienced General Agency 

3. The only Kentucky Company writing these policies 

YOU WILL RECEIVE: 

1. Excellent Benefits R 

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4. Policies Approved by K.H.S.A.A. H 

! 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^ke Kinx^xieH, Qo^nfuuuf 



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608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 2-8522 



NEW EQUIPMENT GUIDE 

Many people have been asking for a prac- 
tical guide to sound practice in the purchase 
and use of equipment and supplies for pro- 
grams in athletics, physical education, and 
recreation. 

In response, The Athletic Institute and 
the American Association for Health, Phy- 
sical Education, and Recreation have just 
released the manual. Equipment and Sup- 
plies for Athletics, Physical Education, and 
Recreation. Suggestions given are designed 
to achieve the greatest possible participa- 
tion and generally to improve programs. The 
price of the manual is $2.50. 

The manual may be used as a textbook 
for such courses as organization and admin- 
istration and planning of facilities and equip- 
ment. An indispensable reference for pro- 
fessional preparation courses, it is essential 
to the professional library of specialists in 
physical activities, school and recreation ad- 
ministrators, coaches, planning consultants, 
purchasing agents, and manufacturers of 
equipment and supplies. Many practical ideas 
are given for carrying out necessary pro- 
cedures, including specific forms and records. 

Material for this new basic reference was 
developed in a national workshop by men and 
women leaders in the specialty fields, by de- 
signers and manufacturers of equipment and 



supplies, and by sdhool administrators, rep- 
resentatives of state departments of educa- 
tion, and other special consultants. 

Order from The Athletic Institute, Room 
805-Merchandise Mart, Chicago 54, Illinois, 
or the AAHPER, 1201-16th St. N. W., Wa.sh- 
ington 6, D. C. 



HALL OF FAME 

At the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
went to press, contributions to the Basket- 
ball Hal! of Fame in the amount of $160.22, 
had been received in the state office of the 
K.H.S.A.A. The contributions by schools 
were as follows : 

Beechwood, $5.00; Calhoun, $10.00; 
Campbell Countv, $5.00; Campbellsville, 
$10.00; Canevville, $5.00; Central, $5.00; 
Henrv Clav, $10.00; Holmes, $5.00; Knott 
Countv, $5.00; Midwav, $20.22; Monticello, 
$5.00 ; Morgan County, $10.00 ; Nancy, $5.00 ; 
Paintsville. $10.00; Pleasure Ridge Park, 
$5.00; Prichard, $20.00; Pulaski County, 
$5.00; Shopville, $5.00; Somerset, $5.00; 
Valley, $5.00; Wayne County, $5.00. 

It is probable that administrators and 
coadhes of numerous other K. H. S. A. A. 
schools will want to send in contributions to 
the Hall of Fame before the end of the cur- 
rent school year. These contributions will be 
forwarded on to the Hall of Fame Committee. 



Many Thanks To Yon 



^ 



We appreciate very much all of our many friends who made our 
room their headquarters during the State Basketball Tournament. It was 
nice to see all of you and we hope to see you again soon. 

Thanks for the nice orders and please rest assured that we will give 
each and everyone our prompt and personal attention. 

We were wondering, have you failed to place your order for award 
sweaters, jackets, chenille letters and other awards? We can give you 
very prompt service and would like to hear from you by long distance 
telephone requesting a salesman or requesting samples. 

The track and field meets as well as the tennis tournaments and golf 
tournaments will soon be at hand. Could we take care of your order on any 
supplies for any of these events? 



BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL 

We have uniforms in stock ready for immediate delivery. 




Sp«10ll'l! I 



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UTCLIFFE CP 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCK'Y 



i 




Hiqh khool Athkh 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION— 1961 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Max Collins, Al Horton, Bruce Breitmeyer, Claude Emrich, Dave 
Kremer, Dick Ward. Second Row: Paul Knopf, Blaine Vetter, Mike Handley, Peter Kotcher, Joe 
Wimsatt, Tom Aubrey, Jack Sprauer. Third Row: John Falvey, Tim Kute, Mike Harpring, Greg 
Meiman, Cooper Buschemeyer, Randy French, Mike Parks, Dudley Morris. Fourth Row: Johnny 
Parsons, Louis Lococo, Bob Sehlinger, Peter Bowen, Tom Diebold, Glenn Hubbuch, Tony Am- 
brose, Scott Prescott. Fifth Row: Bill Ackerman, Bill Martin, Ricky Parris, Charlie Tandy, 
John Lococo, Dave Reilly, Mike Koch, Tom Finnegan, Tom Harpring. 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 13B1 




HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "B" CHAMPION— 1961 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Dave Trunnell, Bob Johnson, Tom Jones, Jennifer Keitz, Donna 
Glass, Beattie Delong, Tom Reik, Pat Roth. Second Row: Tom Bootes, Ben Hall, Rick Hill, 
Mitch Miller, Todd Winslow, Jack Addams, Jere Painter, Coach Howard Law. Third Row: Roger 
Boone, Jim McGraw, Lanny Hutchinson, Jim Stivers, Charles Dorsey, Jim Fulmer. Kim Reik. 



1960-61 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Four hundred thirty-four schools joined 
the Associ?tion during 1960-61. This is ten 
less than were enrolled in 1959-60. One hun- 
dred forty-eig'ht schools had eleven-man 
football teams, and thirteen played eight- 
man football. This is an increase of two 
eleven-man teams and one eight-man team 
over 1959-60. 

Financial renorts filed by the sixteen 
regional basketball tournament managers 
show total receipts of Sf;i47,734.93. Receipts 
from sixty-two of the sixty-four district 
basketball tournaments amounted to $229, 
699.74. Receipts from ticket sales at the 
State Basketball Tournament, including state 
tax, will approximate $140,000.00. Profit to 
the Association on the tournament will be 
close to $100,000.00. This will not be far 
from the profits realized by the Association 
in 1957, when the State Toui-nament was 



fir -t held in Freedom Hall, Louisville. A com- 
plete record of all receipts and disburse- 
ments will appear in a subsequent issue of 
the Association magazine. 

One thousand two hundred thirty-five 
basketball officials and 459 football officials 
registered with the Association in 1960-61. 
Nine football rules clinics were held under 
the direction of Edgar McNabb, and forty- 
four football officials took the National Fed- 
eration examination for the higher ratings. 
Of this number, two were added to the 
"certified" list, and twenty-five to the "ap- 
proved" list. Charlie Vettiner, veteran train- 
er of officials, conducted fifteen basketball 
clinics, and held the School for Basketball 
Officials. Additional meetings and clinics 
were held by the regional representatives 
wtho continue to render a fine service to the 
officials and schools in their respective areas. 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIII— NO. 10 



May, 1961 



1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-fourth annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday afternoon, April 6, 1961. 

President Louis Litchfield called the 
meeting to order at 2:30, and asked the 
Commissioner to call the roll of delegates. 
Fifty-four regularly elected delegates or 
alternates answered the roll call. The follow- 
ing delegates were seated in the absence of 
the delegates or alternates from their res- 
pective districts: G. W. Parks, D. 46; Clin- 
ton B. Hammons. D. 50; Sam Potter, D. 52; 
Jim Hutchins, D. 57 ; Denzil Halbert, D. 58 ; 
Paul Trimble, D. 59. 

W. K. Niman moved, seconded by Ray 
Hammers, that the minutes of the 1960 
annual meeting of the Association, which 
had been sent previouslv to all members 
schools, be approved without being read. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a re- 
port on the activities of the Association 
during the 1960-61 school year (The report 
of the Commissioner appears elsewhere in 
this issue of the magazine). President Litch- 
field introduced to the Delegate Assembly 
Preston Holland and Don R. Rawlings, re- 
cently elected to the Board of Control for a 
period of four years beginning July 1, 1961, 
and representing Sections 1 and 6 respective- 
ly. 

President Litchfield stated that consider- 
ation of the proposals was the next order of 
business. 

Paul Perdue moved, seconded by H. D. 
Glenn, that Proposal I be amended to provide 
that the provisions of the proposal, if the 
proposal should carry, should become effec- 
tive at the beginning of the 1964-65 school 
year. The amendment failed to carry. Mil- 
lard Tolliver moved, seconded by Jim Caudill, 
that Proposal L providing that "nineteenth" 
be substituted for "twentieth" in By-Law 
4, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Millard Tolliver moved, seconded by L. R. 
Singleton, that Proposal II, establishing a 
deadline for the submitting of a Board of 



Control nomination, be adopted. The motion 
was carried. 

Jim Caudill moved, seconded by James 
H. Phillips, that Proposal HL providing that 
the President and Vice-President of the 
Board of Control shall be elected by mem- 
bers of the Board to serve for one year and 
that they shall not be eligible to serve for 
more than two one-year terms in succession, 
be adopted. The motion was carried. 

John Trapp moved, seconded by Clinton 
B. Hammons, that Proposal IV, calling for 
repeal of certain irrelevant sections of As- 
sociation regulations, be adopted. The motion 
was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Leslie 
Dyehouse, that Proposal V be amended to 
read as follows: "To be eligible for member- 
shin on the Board of Control, one must be 
actively engaged in the teaching profession 
(teacher, administrator or supervisor) in his 
local section as a regular staff member in 
some official capacity, and must remain in 
some such similar capacity in the section 
from which he is elected during the complete 
tenure of office." The motion was carried 
unanimously. Roy Reasor moved, seconded 
by Paul Perdue, that Proposal V as amended 
be adopted. The motion was carried. 

Millard Tolliver moved, seconded by W. 
K. Niman, that Proposal VL clarifying the 
method used by the Board of Control in 
filling a vacancy on the Board, be adopted.. 
The motion was carried. 

John Trapp moved, seconded by W. K. 
Niman, that Proposal VH, clarifying the re- 
quirements for officials receiving the ap- 
proved and certified ratings, be adopted. The 
motion was carried. 

John V. Hegenauer moved, seconded by- 
Robert Naber, that Proposal VHI, providing 
that By-Law 43 be amended to allow girl 
cheerleaders to represent an all-boys school 
under certain conditions, be adopted. The 
motion failed to carry by the necessary two- 
thirds vote required for amending the By- 
Law. 

(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Mav, 1961 



VOL. XXHI— NO. 10 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President LK)uis Litchfield (1967-61), Marion 

Vice-President. W. B. Jones (1957-61), Somerset 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin: Jack Dawson 
(1958-62), Loiisville: Robert P. Forsythe (19B9-63). Green- 
ville: K. G. ilillaspie (1959-63). Georgetown: Oran C. Teater 
(1960-641, Pantsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960 641 Harlan. 

Subscription Rates SI. On Per Yrnr 



J'lotn the Ct 



omynissionei s 



Off. 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1960-61 Basketball Participation list 
(Eligibility). 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball. 



State Track Committee 

The State High School Track Meet, 
scheduled to be held in Lexingiton on May 
19-20, will be managed by Ath. Dir. John 
Heber of the Henry Clay High School. Other 
members of the committee are : Preston Hol- 
land, Murray ; Ceorge Claiborne, Owensboro ; 
Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green ; Scott 
Smith, Fort Knox; Eddie Weber, Louisville; 
-Joe Curtsinger, Louisville ; John Schaar, 
Bellevue; Joe Brummett, Danville; Herb 
Tye, Bartourville ; Arthur Mullins, Elkhorn 
City ; Ernie Chattin, Ashland. These regional 
managers will assist Mr. Heber in conduct- 
ing the State Meet. 

Fines for Late Reports 

More tfian 130 member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials 
and their basketball participation (eligi- 
bility) lists for the 1960-61 season when this 
issue of the ATHLETE went to press. Some 
730 basketball officials have not filed their 
reports on member schools. The Board of 
Control has established a fine of $5.00 for 
both schools and officials delinquent with 
their reports. A deadline of June 15 has 
been set for the filin.g of all reports required 
under association rules. Officials who have 
not worked any games should notify the 
K.H.S.A.A. office accordingly. Such notifica- 
tion is considered a report. 

Golf Tournaments 

The eight regional golf tournaments, the 
sites of which were given in the April issue 
of the ATHLETE, will be managed by the 



following men : Ath. Dir. Fred Clayton, Cald- 
well County High School, Ath. Dir. Elvis 
Donaldson, Bowling Green High School, Mr. 
"Oz" Johnson, Valley High School; Prin. 
Milton Traylor, Paris High School; Mr. 
Julian Pitzer, Middlesboro Hi.gh School; Mr. 
Walter Baulch. Holmes High School; Mr. 
Fred Allen, Atherton High School; Prin. 
Paul Trimble, Paintsville High School. The 
State Golf Tournament will be held at Fort 
Knox on May 23-24, and will be managed by 
Coach John Hackett of the Fort Knox High 
School. Principals who 'have not received 
their entry blanks should write to their 
respective managers for these forms. 

Tennis Tournaments 

There are seven regional tournaments 
for boys being held in tennis this year. There 
are two tournaments for the Louisville and 
Jefferson County schools, both managed by 
Coach Emmett Goranflo of the Eastern High 
School, and there are two tournaments for 
the North and South Lexington Regions, 
both managed by Coach Eugene Huff of the 
University High School. The other three 
tournaments are being managed by Coach 
James Bravard of Hopkinsville, Coach Scott 
Smith of Fort Knox, and Coach Roger Klein 
of Bellevue. The State Tennis Tournament 
will be held in Louisville on May 15-16, and 
will be managed by Coach Goranflo. 

By the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
comes from the press, six regional tennis 
tournaments for girls will have been con- 
ducted. These tournaments were scheduled 
to be managed by Mrs. Tom Rowlett, Mur- 
r.iy ; Miss Robye Anderson, Bowling Green ; 
Miss Margaret Sheegog, Louisville ; Roger 
Klein, Bellevue ; Miss Mary Rose Branstet- 
ter, Jefferson County ; and Gene Huff, Lex- 
ington. The State Tennis Tournament for 
Girls will be held at Shawnee Park, Louis- 
ville, on May 12-13. This tournament will 
be managed by Miss Margaret Sheegog, du- 
Pont Manual High School, Louisville. 

Attention, Principals! 

More than 180 principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools have not as yet filed re- 
quests this school year for their insurance 
subsidies. If the school is underwriting all 
or part of insurance protection for its ath- 
letes, the Board of Control will allow a max- 
imum credit or refund of $30.00 to each 
school for "all sports except football," and 
an additional credit or refund of $30.00 to 
each school maintaining a football team. 
Principals of schools which qualify for the 
credit or refund should write for reimburse- 
ment forms at once. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Page Three 



1961 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, February 25, 1961 
TEAM SCORING— Class "A" 

























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CLASS A 
Results 



Kel 



Waggener 
( :30.3) ; Bryant, 



1. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

Heat No. 1: Moter, St. Xavier (5:38.9) , 
Fuller Bryan Station (5 :47.4) ; Meiman, 
St. Xavier (6:15.0): Whayne. Eastern 
(6:42.1): Shelinger, St. Xavier (6:44.7). 

Heat No. 2: McAlpin, Atherton 
(5:20.8); Wyatt. Waggener (6:39.0); 
Wilson, Bryan Station (5 :40.6) ; Ball, 
Atherton (6:45.2); Oldham, Atherton 

Heat No. 3: Benner, Seneca (5:22.3): 
Bowen, St. Xavier (5:35.5); Holllday, 
Lafayette (5:52.3); Bayhi, Lafayette 
(6:30.8); Murphy, Lafayette (6:46. J). 

Heat No. 4 : Farmer, Waggener 
(4:32.6); Kute, St. Xavier (4:41.0), 
Georgi, Waggener (4:45.7); Hammonds, 
Lafayette (5:01.9); Thompson, Atherton 
(5:05.4). 

Finals 

Farmer. Waggener 4:32.6 

Kute. St. Xavier 4:41.0 

Georgi, Waggener 4:45.7 

Hammonds, Lafayette 5:01.9 

Thompson, Atherton 5:05.4 

McAlpin, Atherton _5 :20.8 

Farmer set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 4:32.6. 

2. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Dabney, Bryan Station 
( :25.5|; Lococo, St. Xavier ( :25.8) ; 
Mudd, Trinity ( :26.6) ; Worrell, Lafay- 
ette ( :27.5) : Kennedy. Atherton ( :28.7) ; 
Bales, Atherton ( :37.1). 

Heat No. 2 : Petit, Lexington Catholic 
( :26.5) : Sprauer, St. Xavier ( :25.8) 
Benn, Atherton ( :25.9) ; Love, Senec 
( :26.4) : Becker. Eastern ( :29.8) 
Breault. Brvan Station ( :31.0). 

Heat No. 3: Roof, Atherton ( :25.1) 
Patton, Lafayette ( :25.1) ; Emmert. 



Lafayette ( :26.8) 
( :27.3) ; Goblin, Sei 
Holmes ( :30.7). 

Heat No. 4 : Peskoe, Waggener 
( :25.4l: Schoening, Waggener ( :26.0) : 
Cooke, Lafayette ( :26.3) ; Bookman. 
Seneca ( :26.9I; Karem. Trinity ( :31.0) ; 
Davenport, Holmes ( :33.0). 

Heat No. 5: Tandy, St. Xavier 
( :24.2): Knopf, St. Xavier ( :25.8) ; 
Ogle. Waggener ( :26.5) ; Sandman, 
Trinity ( :28.8) ; Huston, Bryan Station 
( 29.2); Stalling, Eastern ( :32.1). 

Finals 

Tandy, St. Xavier 

Dabney, Bryan Station . 

Roof, Atherton 

Patton, Lafayette 

Peskoe, Waggener 

Petit, Lexington Cathol: 

100 Yard Butterfly — 

Heat No. 1 : Horton, St. Xavier 
(1:08.0): Henderson, Waggener (1:09.0); 
Clark, Waggener (1 :15.6) : Kozlove, Sen- 
eca (1:1C.8); Akin. Atherton (1:21.5); 
Hart, Bryan Station (1:29.9). 

Heat No. 2 : Vetter, St. Xavier 
(1:07.4); Ackerman, St. Xavier (1:09.3); 
Goodwin. Trinity (1:13.3); Lococo, St. 
Xavier (1:16.0): Wrightman, Lafayette 
(1:16.7): McAlpin, Atherton (1:21.4). 



Xavier (2:30.1) ; Benner, S 
Oldham, Atherton (2 :43.4) 
- - 13:07.7) 



neca (2:33.4) ; 
Miller, East- 



ern i6:u/.i;. 

Heat No. 3: Kute, St. Xavier (2:10.8) ; 
McGill, Trinity (2:12.7); Kennedy, Ather- 
ton (2 :29.6 ) ; Wilson, Bryan Station 
(2:32.4); Stevens, Seneca (2:37.4). 

Heat No. 4 : Farmer. Waggener 
(2:08.0); Jones. Lafayette (2:34.8): Ball, 
Atherton (2:36.0): " " 
(2:43.3). 



Fuller, Bryan Station 



2:02.1 

2:07.3 

2:07.8 



Finals 

1. Vetter, St. Xavier 1:03.7 

2. Horton, St. Xavier 1:07.3 

3. Ackerman, St. Xavier 1 :07.5 

4. Henderson. Waggener 1 :09.8 

5. Goodwin, Trinity 1:13.2 

6. Lococo, St. Xavier 1:14.7 

4. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Hammonds, Lafayette 
(2:14.2): Thompson, Atherton (2:19.9) 
Shaw. Trinity (2:43.1); Bayhi, Lafayett. 
(2:50.1): Farley, Lafayette (2:50.6) 
Bibb, Trinity (3:01.0). 

Heat No. 2: Georgi, Waggener (2:10.0) 
Diebold, St. Xavier (2:16.3); Martin, St, 2. 



Finals 

1. Farmer, Waggener _ 

2. Kute. St. Xavier 

3. Georgi, Waggener __. 

4. Hammonds, Lafayette 

5. McGill, Trinity 2:13.0 

6. Diebold, St. Xavier 2:17.2 

Farmer set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:02.1. 
5. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Finnegan. St. Xavier 
(1:11.1): Ashford. Lafayette (1:16.0); 
Bowen, St. Xavier (1:19.4); Coblin, St. 
Xaxier (1:21.2): Perry, Trinity (1:22.8); 
Cundiff, Eastern (1:36.6). 

Heat No. 2 : Dorton, Waggener 
(1:09.8): Metcalf, Atherton (1:12.2): 
Geiser, Waggener (1:13.0); Terrill, Bryan 
Station 11:19.9); Sawyer. Atherton 
(1:20.4). 

Heat No. 3 : Sympson. Lafayette 
(1:10.4); Call, Trinity (1:14.4); Parris. 
St. Xavier (1:20.8); Schell, Seneca 
(1:22.0): Murray, Bryan Station (1:24.0); 
Lacy, Eastern (1:46.3). 

Heat No. 4 : Abbott, Waggener 
(1:02.8); Cummins. Atherton (1:13.01; 
French, St. Xavier (1:14.0): Hash, Bryan 
Station (1:20.6); Holliday, Lafayette 
(1:22.6): Payton. Eastern (2:00.21. 

Heat No. 6: Geiser, Waggener (1:11.3) ; 
Cummins. Atherton (1:13.3). 



Finals 

Abbott, Waggener _. 
Sympson, Lafayette 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



3. Dorton, Waggener 1:09.4 

4. Finnegan, St. Xavier 1:10.0 

.5. Metcalf. Atherton 1:12.2 

6. Geiser, Waggener 1:12.2 

Abbott set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1 :02.1. 

5. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1: Koch, St. Xavier (1:14.5); 
Walker. Lafayette (1:16.01; Pohler. Trin- 
ity (1:20.2); Driver, Seneca (1:22.4); 
Hill, Eastern (1:33.1); Durham, Holmes 
(1:48.8). 

Heat No. 2 : Parsons, St. Xavier 
(1:15.0); Smith. Atherton (1:17.4): 
Liebschutz, Atherton 11:19.2); Feldbaum, 
Seneca (1:21.6); Stone, Bryan Station 
(1:41.9); Streible, Eastern (1:52.8). 

Heat No. 3: Ambrose. St. Xavier 
(1:13.3); Kiviniemi, Lafayette (1:23.5); 
Boylan, Waggener (1:24.6); HoUings- 
worth. Bryan Station (1:40.0). 

Heat No. 4 : Henderson, Waggener 
(1:12.4); Stone, Bryan Station (1:21.6); 
Georgi, Waggener (1:22.7); Miller. Wag- 
gener (1:23.6); Wayman, Bryan Station 
(1:37.5). 

Heat No. 5: Reilly, St. Xavier 
(1:11.6): Heady, Atherton (1:19.7); 
Swisher, Atherton (1 ;19.9) ; Hammonds. 
Lafayette (1:22.2); Henry, Lafayette 
(1:33.6). 

Finals 

1. Eeillv, St. Xavier 1:10.0 

2. Ambrose, St. Xavier 1:12.4 

3. Henderson, Waggener 1:12.8 

4. Koch, St. Xavier 1:15.0 

5. Parsons. St. Xavier 1:15.3 

6. Walker. Lafayette 1 :17.0 

Relllv set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1:10.0, 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1 : Dabney. Brs-an Station 



(:55.9); Petit, Lexington Catholic ( :57.5) ; 
Fransen. Atherton (l:«0.3l; Franken- 
burger. Atherton (1:00.6): DeVan. Holm- 
es (1:07.3); Murphy, Lafayette (1:13.2). 

Heat No. 2: Walker, Lafayette ( :55.5) ; 
Lococo, St. Xavier ( :56.8) ; Johnson, 
.\therton (1:03.4); Perlstien, Waggener 
(1:04.4); Moter. Seneca (1:09.2). 

Heat No. 3: Tandy. St. Xavier ( ;56.6) 
Patton, Lafayette ( :58.4 ) ; Peak, Trinity 
(1:01.0); Wilson, Waggener (1:02.1) 
Shaw, Trinity (1:08.1). 

Heat No. 4: Peskoe, Waggener (:56.1) 

Vetter, St. Xavier 1:57.4); Diebold, St. 

Xavier (1:00.2); Hart, Bryan Station 

(1:05.4); Ritchey. Seneca (1:05.7). 

Finals 

1. Tandy, St. Xavier :54.4 

2. Peskoe, Waggener :55.7 

3. Walker, Lafayette :55.9 

4. Dabney, Brvan Station :56.3 

5. Vetter, St. Xavier :56.8 

6. Lococo, St. Xavier :57.8 

Tandv set a new state record in this 

event with his time of :54.4. 
Fancy Diving — 

Profumo, St. Xavier 270.35 

Witte, Waggener 257.20 

Kotcher, St. Xavier 241.10 

Kruckas, Lafayette 240.25 

Snow. Atherton 204.05 

Dulworth, Waggener 196.06 

Collins, St. Xavier 171.45 

200 Yard Individual Medley- 
Heat No. 1 : Parsons, St. Xavier 
Waggener (2:38.4); 

(2:45.5) ; Lococo. St. 

Liebschutz, Atherton 



(2:35.1) : Dorton, 
Feldbaum, Seneca 
Xavier (2:49,6); 
(3:09.9). 

Heat No. 2 
(2:29.3) ; 



2 : Walker, Lafayette 
r, Waggener (2:33.6); 
Xavier (2:47.5): Parks, 



St. Xavier (2:63.1). 

Heat No. 3: Abbott, Waggener 
(2:18.0); McGill, Trinity (2:34.2); Walk- 
er, Lafayette (2:35.3); Kretschman, 
Atherton (3:16.1). 

Finals 

1. Abbott, Waggener 2:19.3 

2. Walker, Lafayette 2:28,9 

3. Geiser, Waggener 2:31.6 

4. McGill, Trinity 2:32.8 

5. Parsons, St. Xavier 2:33.5 

6. Walker, Lafayette 2:34.1 

10. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

St. Xavier (Finnegan, Reilly, Horton, 

Hubbach) 1:57.3 

Trinity (Call, Pohler, Goodwin, Hos- 

kins) 2:03.2 

Lafayette (Sympson, H a m m o n ds. 

Wightman, Cooke) 2 :03.3 

Atherton (Cummins, Heady, Roof. 

Fransen) 2:03.9 

Waggener (Axton. Miller, Clarke, 

Shapero) 2:08.7 

Bryan Station (Terrill, Stone, Hart, 

Huston) 2:12.8 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 
St. Xavier (Knopf, Aubrey, Ambrose, 

Sprauer) 1:41.5 

Waggener (Schoening, Kern, Wilson, 

Ogle) 1:46.8 

Atherton (Smith, Johnson, Snow, 

Bonn) 1:47.1 

Trinity (Mudd, Peak. Cleveland, Hos- 

kins) 1:48.1 

Lafayette (Emmert, Schrim, Farley, 

Worrell) 1:50.4 

Seneca (Bochman, Driver, Kozlove, 

Love) 1:.50.8 

St. Xavier set a new state record in 
•nt with the time of 1:41.5. 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, Class B, April I, 1961 



TEAM SCORING — Class "B" 



TEAM 




100 Yard 
Backstroke 


p 
2m 


II 




-d 
c 




i 


3.1 



Hiehlands ___ __ 



5 

2V2 

1 

7 



21/2 



4 










11 
7 

3 



1 







7 
4 



7 

3 

1 





9 
4 
5 





4 






8 

2 
5 

7 









6 
5 

3 
7 










10 
14 
6 
8 

2 

4 







14 
8 

10 
2 
4 

6 








65 


Gov- Catholic . 


47 




251/2 


Ky. Military Inst. 


22 
18 




16 




8^2 




8 




8 




1 












Old Ky. Home 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Page Five 



CLASS "B" 

RESULTS 
1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Morrison, M.M.I. ( :27.2) ; 
Suetholz, Gov. Catholic ( :27.5) ; James, 
Dayton ( :32.8) ; Robertson, Bellevue 
(:37.4|. 

Heat No. 2 : Higgins, HopkinsviUe 
(:26.2): Grossman, Foundation ( :28.2) ; 
Gambill. University ( :28.2) ; Winslow, 
Highlands ( :28.5) ; McGee, HopkinsviUe 
(:30.2); Williams. Bellevue (:37.3). 

Heat No. 3: Detzel, Gov. Catholic 
(:25.8l; Fox, Gov. Catholic ( :29.5) ; 
Hutchinson, Highlands ( :29.6) : Hibbs, 
Old Kentucky Home (:29.8): Taylor, Old 
Kentucky Home ( :28.5) ; Gulp, Bellevue 
(:39.6l. 

Heat No. 4: Hibbs. Old Kentucky 
Home (:2S.7l; Clarke. K.M.I. ( :28.8) ; 
Baker, Beechwood ( ;30.2j ; Trunnel, 
Highlands (:31.5): Sipple, Beechwood 
(:32.0l: Vann, Dayton (:36.5). 

Heat No 5: Wade, University ( :25.3) : 
Tully. Gov. Catholic (:27.3): Vollette, 
K.M.I. (:29.6l; Walz, Dayton (:30.0); 
Ferguson, Dayton ( :32.0) : Hall, Highlands 
(:32.3). 

Heat No. 6: Chase, Frankfort ( :26.4) ; 
Miner, Beechwood (:27.2); Nichols. K.M.I. 
(:28.6l: McKelvey, University (:29.3); 
Russell, University {:4.3). 
Finals 

1. Wade, University :25.7 

2. Detzel, Gov. Catholic :25.7 

3. Higgins, HopkinsviUe :25.9 

4. Chase, Frankfort :26.2 

5. Miner, Beechwood :26.2 

6. Morrison. K.M.I. :26.5 

2. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Fulmer. H i g h 1 ands 
(1:13.11 ; Armstrong, University (1:20.8); 
Dawson, Beechwood (1:22.3): Dade Hop- 
kinsviUe (1 :24.8) ; Grayson, Gov. Catholic 
(1:26.1): Russell, Dayton (2:11.6). 

Heat No. 2: Hill, Highlands (1:20.1); 
Rettig. Beechwood (1:20.6); Henschen. 
Bellevue (1:21.7); Clover, Frankfort 
(1:34.4): Wetzel, Dayton (1:41.5). 

Heat No. 3 : Dorsey, H i g h 1 ands 
(1:07.0): Bolizar, Fort Knox (1:18.0); 
Davis, K.M.I. (1:18.2): Nichols. Founda- 
tion (1:25.4): Addams, Highlands 
(1:31.1). 

Heat No. 4 ; Roeding, Gov. Catholic 
(1:09.3); Perez, Gov. Catholic (1:16.4); 
Rieskamp, Gov. Catholic (1:19.0); Call, 
Foundation (1:42.8). 

Finals 
r. Dorsey, Highlands 1 :06.2 

2. Roeding, Gov. Catholic 1 :09.2 

5. Fulmer, Highlands 1:10.7 

4. Davis. K.M.I. 1:17.3 

6. Perez, Gov. Catholic 1 :17.8 

6. Boldizar, Fort Knox 1:19.6 

Dorsev set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1 :06.2. 

3. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 



Heat No. 1: Rettig, Gov. Catholic 
(1:24.1); Kelly, K.M.I. (1:29.4); Seelie, 
Gov. Catholic (1:32.7); McPherson, Hop- 
kinsviUe (1 :37.6) ; Wharton, Beechwood 
(1:40.9); Owings, Dayton (3:06.6). 

Heat No. 2: Boone, Highlands (1:20.1) ; 
Clark, Fort Knox (1:20.4); Wade, Uni- 
versity (1:29.0). 

Heat No. 3 : Grayson. Gov. Catholic 
(1:20.3); Stivers, Highlands (1:21.8); 
Pierson, Fort Knox (1:32.2); Dawson, 
Bellevue (1:34.2); Johnson, Highlands 
(2:06.6). 

Heat No. 4: Cavana, Bellevue (1:18.8) ; 
Williamson, Foundation (1 :22.2) ; Roth, 
Highlands (1:37.8). 

Finals 

1. Cavana, Bellevue 

Highlands 

, Gov. Catholic 

Fort Knox 

. Highlands 

Foundation . 

eestyle— 

1 : Higgins. Hopk: 



V. Highlands (2:51.4); 
(3:00.7) ; Bezold, High- 






Stive 
Willi: 
100 Yard 
Heat 



1:17.6 
1:18.8 
1:20.0 
1 :21.0 
1:21.7 
1:24.3 

lie 
1:00.3): Hellman. Cov. Catholic (1:00.9); 
Jordan, Beechwood (1:01.6); James, Day- 
ton (1:20.1); Becker, Fort Knox (1:21.1); 
Kirkpatrick, Fort Knox (1:22.5). 

Heat No. 2: Hellman, Cov. Catholic 
(:59.1); Bootes, Highlands (1:01.1); 
Wallace. Fort Knox (1:08.6); Reeves, 
University (1:11.0|; Hibbs, Old Kentucky 
Home (1:12.8); Russell, Dayton (1:36.7). 

Heat No. 3 : Sullivan, Frankfort 
(1:02.31; Smith. Foundation (1:03.3); 
Hibbs, Old Kentucky Home (1:08.2 1; 
Ferguson, Bellevue (1:10.0); Beik, High- 
lands (1:15.1): Smith, Bellevue (1:27.9). 

Heat No. 4: Reik, Highlands ( :59.8) ; 
Kuehne, K.M.I. (1:06.1): Rieskamp, Gov- 
Catholic (1:08.7); Painter, Highlands 
(1:10.3); Grossman, Foundation (1:18.3); 
Hai-mon, Dayton (1:38.0). 

Heat No. 5: Seay, University (1:02.8); 
Brown, Dayton (1:16.0); Auge, Beech- 
wood (1:18.1) ; Ferguson, Bellevue (1:19.7). 
Finals 



6. 



Reik. Highlands 




6S.4 


Jordan, Beechwood 




00.0 


Higgins. HopkinsviUe 




00.0 


Bootes, Highlands 




00.3 


Hellman, Gov. Catholic 




00.6 


Hellman, Cov. Catholic . 




00.6 



cy Di' 



194.10 
188.30 
168.00 



Final; 

1. Cavana. Bellevue _ 

2. Glass. Highlands _ 

3. Stewart, K.M.I. __ 

4. Jones. Highlands 162.10 

5. Adair, Beechwood 148.65 

6. Alexander. K.M.I. 146.70 

7. O'Connor, Cov. Catholic 124.00 

6. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1 : Wade. University (2:32.5) ; 
Nelson. K.M.I. (2:50.1); Ware, Beech- 
wood (3:53.5); Kirby, Dayton (3:56.9); 

Heat No. 2 : Reoding, Gov. Catholic 



(2:38.1) : McGra 
McMillan, K.M.I, 
lands (3;30.1). 

Finals 

1. Wade, University - 

2. Roeding, Cov. Cathol; 

3. McGraw, Highlands 

4. Nelson. K.M.I. 3:16.8 

5. Bezold, Highlands 3:31.5 

Wade set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:30.8. 

7. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 
Heat No. 1 : Highlands (Dorsey, 

Boone, Stivers, Fulmer) 2:02.9; Beech- 
wood (Rettig, Castleman, Allen, Pierce) 
2 :14.0 ; Fort Knox (Boldizar, Clark, Lieb, 
Dawson I 2:16.7. 

Heat No. 2: Cov. Catholic (F. Hell- 
man, S. Hellman. Grayson, Detzel) 2:00.9; 
K.M.I. (Davis, Kelly, Nelson, Morrison) 
2:12.0; Bellevue (Henschen, Alexander, 
Wuilleumier. Ferguson) 2:30.0. 

Finals 

1. Cov. Catholic (F. Hellman, 
Grayson, S. Hellman, Detzel) ._ 2:02.1 

2. Highlands (Dorsey, Boone, 

Stivers, Fulmer) 2:02.7 

3. K.M.I. (Davis, Kelly, Nelson 
Morrison) 2:10.1 

4. Beechwood (Rettig, Castle- 
man. Allen, Pierce) 2:13.0 

5. Fort Knox (Boldizar, Clark, 

Lieb, Dawson) 2:18.2 

6. Bellevue (Henschen, Alexan- 
der. Wuilleumier, Ferguson) _. 2:31.5 

8. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : Highlands (Bootes, Mc- 
Graw, Winslow, K. Reik) 1:49.6; Gov. 
Catholic (Suetholz, Fox, Perez. Tully) 
1:50.4; Frankfort (Blair, Morris, Sulli- 
van, Chasel 1:52.6; K.M.I. (Vollette, 
Kuehne, Clark, Nichols) 1 :56.0 ; Fort 
Knox (Wallace, Hunt, Lieb, Dawson) 
1:69.6; HopkinsviUe (McGee, Higgins, 
R. McGee. Dade) 1 :59.6. 

Heat No. 2 : Beechwood (Miner, Allen, 
Castleman, Pierce) 1:50,5; University 
(McKelvey, Gambill, Reeves, Seay) 1:55.0; 
Foundation (Smith, Nicholas. McCray, 
Grossman) 1:58.4: Dayton (P. James, 
Ferguson, G. James, Harmon) 2:12.1; 
Bellevue (Ferguson. Thomas, Delmer, 
Sipple) 2:13.0. 

Finals 

1. Highlands (Bootes, McGraw, 
Winslow, Reik) 1;60.2 

2. Beechwood (Miner, Allen, 
Castleman, Pierce) 1:50.5 

3. Cov. Catholic (Suetholz, 

Fox, Perez, Tully) 1 :60.7 

4. Frankfort (Blair, Morris, 

Sullivan, Chase) 1:52.2 

6. University (McKelvey, 

Gambill, Reeves, Seay) 1 :55.2. 

6. K.M.I. (Vollette, Kuehne, 

Clark. Nichols) 1:56.6 



Minutes of the Annual Meeting 

(Continued from Page One) 
H. D. Glenn move(3, seconded by John 
Trapp, that Proposal IX, giving the Board of 
Control authority to sanction certain games 
sponsored by a coaches' association, be 
adopted. The motion was carried. 

There being no further business, Presi- 
dent Litchfield declared the meeting ad- 
journed. 

The dinner meeting of the Association 
was held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M., with more than 
500 delegates and other school officials pre- 
sent. Recipient of the Game-Guy Award was 
Bill Davis of Harrodsburg High School, a 
boy who has been crippled since birth, 
weighing only 115 pounds. Bill had been 



selected for "honorable mention" on the All- 
State football eleven. The presentation of the 
award was made by K.H.S.A.A. Vice-Presi- 
dent W. B. Jones. 

Professor Morton Walker of the Univer- 
sity of Louisville faculty gave the address 
of the evening. Mr. Walker, discussed the 
responsibilities and opportunities of the 
coach and teacher to athletes on their teams. 
His humorous remarks and sound philosophy 
of teaching were enjoyed by all those pre- 
sent. 

NEW FILM 

The K.H.S.A.A. has secured from the National Federation 
office and has placed on loan with the film library of the 
University of Kentucky a new film, BATTER UP. The sound 
film, which is in color, two reels, was produced by the National 
and American Leagues of Baseball. It shows the proper tech- 
niques of batting as demonstrated by the hitting stars of the 
majors. It is dedicated to Stan Musial and Ted Williams who are 
featured, along with Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, Willie Mays 
and many other great players. 



Paa-e Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

Sports activities thrive during the fall, 
winter, and spring in Kentucky's communi- 
ties because the State High School Athletic 
Progi-am is operating. There should be a 
continuation of all wholesome sports and 
recreation during the summer months when 
schools are closed. 

Every community in Ketucky should have 
a summer playground program. Many com- 
munities recognize this fact plus their need 
for recreation geared to community needs 
on a year around basis. They would like to 
start playground and recreation programs, 
but they lack the knowledge of the 
mechanics of organization and administra- 
tion. 

The White House Study Committee on 
Recreation directed in 1960 by the Dutch- 
man revealed a tremendous amount of rec- 
reational frustration in Kentucky's com- 
munities. More than 1500 questionnaires, re- 
turned from every section of our state, 
revealed that community leaders realize that 
failure to provide wholesome recreation at 
home causes bovs and nrirls to seek fun in 
questionable places elsewhere. They want to 
start local recreation program, but they just 
do not know how! 

Kentucky's state parks are the finest. A 
superb job has been done in the conversion 
of our natural beauty into strategically 
located parks. But our rapidly growing com- 
munities need local recreation and com- 
munity parks and playgrounds to supple- 
ment the state park system. The average 
individual, not living near .state parks, is 
only able financially to afford a trip or two 
annually to these havens of relaxation. 

State Darks alone, will not satisfy the rec- 
reational needs of Kentucky's communities. 
Neither will they discharge completely the 
recreational responsibility the State has to 
its communities. The local playground and 
recreation program, which may be used 
daily, must be developed. 

A recreation consultant service emanating 
from our state university and state-sup- 
ported colleges and co-ordinated by the 
State Department of Education would be 
an inexpensive service invaluable to Ken- 
tucky's communities in the launching of pro- 
grams of recreation. 

The State has some responsibility to com- 
munities striving to solve their problems 
locally. These communities have a right to 
expect advice and recreational guidance on 
the state level. Local leaders should have rec- 




THE DUTCHMAN 

reation consultant service made available to 
them at strategic locations. These locations 
are our state-supported colleges and univer- 
sity. The co-ordination of effort should be 
supplied by A State Recreation Consultant 
associated with the State Department of 
Education. 

If the community leaders in the areas 
surrounding Murray, Western, Morehead, 
Eastern, and the University of Kentucky 
could have had State Recreation Consultant 
Service supplied them by these state-sup- 
ported institutions, Kentucky would have 
seen gratifying park and recreational deve- 
lopments during the past ten years, but that 
is water over the dam. The point is that the 
next decade must be one of park, playground, 
and recreational progress because of increas- 
ing leisure time and the importance of parks, 
playgrounds, and recreation to our aging, 
youth, and industry. 

The key to future recreational progress 
will be the knowledge of organization and 
procedure possessed by our community lead- 
ers. The logical place for these leaders to go 
to acquire this knowledge is the state-sup- 
ported institution of higher learning serv- 
ing their area. Our university and state-sup- 
ported colleges already have departments of 
recreation for students, headed by specia- 
lists in the field of recreation. It would be 
relatively inexpensive to extend this service 
to surrounding counties and cities needing 
guidance. Our Kentucky colleges are in a 
position to render one of their greatest ser- 
vices since the turn of the century Recrea- 
tion Consultant Service. Such service will 
make it possible for all communities to ac- 
quire the knowledge essential to the opening 
of summer playgrounds and recreation pro- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Page Seven 



grams all over Kentucky. 

The Dutchman needs your help to help 
Kentucky ! Many of the readers of The Fly- 
ing Dutchman are active in the legislature. 
Enabling legislation must be passed in 1962 
to get this plan into action ; other readers 
can get this publicized in their local news- 
papers. If you want to help, the Dutchman 
will send j^ou a copy of his State Recreation 
Consultant Plan. Address: The Flying 
Dutchman, Armory Building, Louisville 2, 
Kentucky. 

With summer playgrounds in mind, it 
was timely that CaiToU Elliott, President of 
the South Central Officials Association of 
Elizabethtown, should nominate Howard 
Gardner for the final Corn Cob Pipe Award 
of the 1960-61 athletic season. Everybody 
knows Howard's reputation as the 
K.H.S.A.A. representative of the Sixth 
Region, but too few know of his unselfish 
efforts for kids in helping them have whole- 
some fun. Howard will be one of the first 
to go to work for playgrounds on a state- 
wide basis because his weight has been be- 
hind E'town's playground program. 

As the Dutchman closes his last column 
for the 1960-61 athletic season, he thanks 
his friends for the many nice letters which 
have come to him. Quite a few ask why so 
much time and effort is given to Game Guys, 
unselfish Kentuckians, sportsman-like com- 
munities, and how playgrounds and their 
development. Edgar A. Guest answers these 
questions best in the following poem : 
I'd like to think when life is done 
That I had filled a needed post, 
That here and there I'd paid my fare 
With more than idle talk and boast; 
That I had taken gifts divine, 
The breath of life and manhood fine, 
And tried to use them now and then 
In service for my fellow man. 

1960-61 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Inside Cover) 

Sixty-eight officials took the National Fed- 
eration basketball examination, with ten be- 
ing added to the "certified" list and forty 
re:eiving the "approved" rating. 

Four schools have been suspended from 
the Association this year. All suspensions 
came as a result of the violation of K.H.S.A 
A. Bv-Law 17, Practice of Sportsmanship. 

The fall of 1960 saw the second season of 
the football class chamnionsi'nips. The play- 
offs were very successful, with there now 
being ariparentlv a revived interest in high 
school football in Kentucky. Several schools 
will inaugurate football in September. 



There is a continuing interest in minor 
and spring sports. Regional cross country 
runs were held in Paducah, Bowling Green, 
Clarkson, Louisville, Bellevue, Lexington and 
Paintsville on October 29 for the pui-pose of 
qualifying teams and individuals for the 
state event, which was held in Lexington on 
November 12. Nine schools sent entries to 
the Class A Section of the State Swimming 
Meet, held in Lexington on February 25. 
Twelve schools sent entries to the Class B 
Section of the State Swimming Meet, held in 
Lexington on April 1. One hundred ninety 
K.H S.A.A. member schools have indicated 
that they will send teams to the twelve 
regional track meets. Fifty district tourna- 
ments have been set up for baseball, to ac- 
commodate the 325 teams which will enter 
the tournament. Ninety-one schools will have 
golf teams this spring, and these teams will 
enter eight regional tournaments to qualify 
for the State Golf Tournament. Fifty-nine 
boys' tennis teams will be entered in seven 
regional tennis tournaments. The Associa- 
tion for the second time will sponsor a State 
Tennis Tournament for giiis. Thirtv-four 
girls' tennis teams will be entered in six 
regional tournaments. 

We believe that the Association is con- 
tinuing to make progress. It is hoped that 
enough interest in girls' swimming and golf 
will be forthcoming in 1961-62 for state 
championships in these two sports to be de- 
termined. Numerous school men in various 
parts of the state have cooperated to the full- 
est with the Commissioner, the Assistant 
Commissioner, and the Board of Control 
when asked to assist in the expanding pro- 
gram of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association. This teamwork is appreciated 
very much. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel. Louisville, on Friday morn- 
ing, April 7, 1961. The meeting was called 
to order by President Louis Litchfield at 
10:00 with all Board members. Commis- 
sioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
Robert P. Forsythe, that the reading of the 
minutes of the March 17th meeting be 
waived since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report 
on State Basketball Tournament receipts and 
expenses. He stated that total receipts will 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



approximate $140,000.00, and he estimated 
that profit to the Association will be a figure 
close to $100,000.00. 

There was a discussion concerning the 
advisability of eliminating the consolation 
game in the State Tournament. W. H. Crow- 
dus moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the Commissioner poll the principals of mem- 
ber schools concerning the advisability of 
eliminating the consolation game in the 
State Basketball Tournament. The motion 
was carried unanimously. It was suggested 
that the poll be conducted at the beginning 
of the 1961-62 school year. 

The Commissioner reported on a poll 
which he had taken, as directed by the 
Board, concerning the possibility of setting 
up experimental districts for 1961 in Foot- 
ball Region 4, Class AA and Football Region 
2, Class AAA. There was a general discussion 
of the proposed plans for regional division. 
K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that Football Region 4, Class AA, 
for 1961 be divided into two districts as 
outlined by the Commissioner. The motion 
was carried unanimously. Jack Dawson 
moved, seconded by W. B. Jones, that the 
Board of Control approve the division of 
Football Region 2, Class AAA, into two 
districts for 1961. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 
State Swimming Committee, in a meeting 
held during the time of the Class B swim- 
ming Meet, had recommended that the Board 
of Control set up a State Swimming Meet 
for girls in 1962. The Board suggested that 
the Commissioner make a survey to deter- 
mine whether or not there is currently 
enough interest in girl's swimming to justify 
a state championship meet in this sport. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that K. G. Gillaspie and Oran C. 
Teater be named respectively delegate and 
alternate to the forthcoming annual meeting 
of the National Federation. The motion was 
carried unanimously. K. G. Gillaspie moved, 
seconded bv Robert P. Forsythe, that the 
Board of Control adopt a policy concerning 
attendance at the National Federation meet- 
ing, held usually late in June or early in 
July, to the effect that outgoing Board mem- 
bers be considered eligible to attend the 
meetings. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

President Wallace Sydnor, Vice Presi- 
dent Ralph Dorsey, and Secretary Treasurer 
Joe Ohr of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association met with the Board of 
Control to discuss the proposed sanction of 



the Kentucky Coaches Association AU-Star 
football and basketball games for 1961. After 
a general discussion of the sanction request, 
Robert P. Forsythe moved, seconded Oran 
C. Teater, that the Board of Control give 
its sanction for 1961 to the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association All-Star football 
and basketball games. The motion was 
carried. 

Supt. Joe P. Duke of the Benton City 
Schools appeared before the Board of Con- 
trol, requesting that both candidates in the 
recent run-off election for Board of Control 
membership representing Section 1, or their 
representatives, be allowed to see the ballots. 
Mr. Duke stated that he was not pi'otesting 
the election vote count. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by Jack Dawson, that the request 
of Mr. Duke be granted. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that he had 
advised by letter Supt. Joe P. Duke of the 
Benton City Schools and Ath. Dir. Preston 
Holland of the MuiTay High School concern- 
ing the ballots cast in the recent run-off 
election, that he had tabulated the votes 
under authoritj^ given him in the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution, and that he had advised the 
two candidates that 25 votes had been cast 
for Mr. Holland and 24 for Mr. Duke. It was 
the opinion of the Board members that a 
technicality having to do with a ballot sent 
in by a representative of a K.H.S.A.A, mem- 
ber school might have disfranchised the 
school and prevented the run-off election 
from being a tie. Jack Dawson moved, sec- 
onded by W. B. Jones, that the Board declare 
the run-off election "no contest," and that 
the Commissioner be directed to send out a 
second run-off ballot to the schools in Section 
1. The motion was carried unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the summer meeting of 
the Board of Control be held at Kenlake 
Hotel, Hardin, Kentucky late in July, the 
dates to be determined by the Commissioner. 
The motion was carried. 

President Litchfield stated that, since 
it was apparent that several items on the 
agenda including the consideration of num- 
erous other sanction requests could not be 
taken up at this meeting, it was his opinion 
that a special meeting of the Board of Con- 
trol should be called soon, and that he hereby 
was calling such a meeting, to be held in 
Lexington, Kentucky, on Saturday, April 22. 
It was necessaiT for President Litchfield to 
leave the meeting at this time, and he asked 
Vice-President W. B. Jones to preside for 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Page Nine 



the remainder of the session. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning March 17, 1961, and 
ending April 6, 1961, be approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Vice-President Jones appointed a Bud- 
get Committee, suggesting that the Com- 
mittee be prepared to present a tentative 
1961-62 budget at the next Board meeting. 
The committee named was: K. G. Gillaspie, 
chairman ; Cecil A. Thornton, and W. H. 
Crowdus. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K.H.S.A.A. Building on April 22, 1961. The 
meeting was called to order bv President 
Louis Litchfield at 9:00, with Board mem- 
bers W. H. Crowdus, Jack Dawson, K. G. 
Gillaspie, W. B. Jones, Oran C. Teater, and 
Cecil A Thornton; Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes 
of the April 7th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

President Litchfield stated that the next 
order of business was the tabulation of the 
ballots in the second run-off election for 
Board membersihip between Supt. Joe P. 
Duke of the Benton Citv Schools and Ath. 
Dir. Preston Holland of the Murray High 
School. Prior to the opening of the sealed 
envelopes which contained the ballots, the 
Commissioner stated that he had received a 
request from a member school principal that 
the ballot which had been sent in by this 
principal be voided and that the principal 
be allowed to change the vote by sending a 
second ballot. The Commissioner stated that 
he had advised the principal that it was 
against Association policy to send out second 
ballots, but that he would bring the request 
to the attention of the Board of Control. W. 
B. Jones moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the request of the principal be denied 
and that the ballot be counted as voted and 
signed by the principal. The motion failed to 
carry. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the ballots now be tabu- 
lated and counted as signed with the correc- 
tion requested by a K.H.S.A.A. member 
school principal prior to the opening of the 



ballots being made. The motion was carried. 
The envelopes containing the ballots were 
then openecl by the Commissioner and tabu- 
lated, Mr. Holland receiving 28 votes, Mr. 
Duke 23. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that a committee of the Board be 
appointed to work with the Commissioner to 
establish a policy for giving consideration to 
actions of schools and pinpointing responsi- 
bility of school officials where there is no 
legal principal. The motion was carried un- 
animously. President Litchfield appointed to 
the Policy Committee K. G. Gillaspie. Jack 
Dawson, and Oran C. Teater. 

There was a general discussion of numer- 
ous sanction requests for post-season All- 
Star games. W. B. Jones moved, seconded 
by Oran C. Teater, that for 1961 the Board 
of Control sanction the Louisville Junior 
Chamber of Commerce All-Star Football 
Game, Pikeville Explorer Scout Post No. 1 
East-West All-Star Basketball games, Lon- 
don Boosters Club 12th and 13th Regional 
All-Star Basketball games, and Elizabeth- 
town Junior Chamber of Commerce Basket- 
ball Games; and that the Board hereby es- 
tablish the policy of not sanctioning any 
future all-star or post-season games, with 
the possible exception of the Kentucky 
Coaches Association All-Star games. The 
motion was carried unaimously. 

The Commissioner presented to the 
Bo^rd of Control a tentative 1961-62 budget, 
which had been approved by the Budget 
Committee. Receipts were estimated to be 
$117,300.00, and disbursements $110,280.00. 
After general discussion of the budget items, 
K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the tentative K.H.S.A.A. bud- 
get for 1961-62, as presented by the Com- 
missioner, be approved. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Upon recommendation by the Commis- 
sioner. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the K.H.S.A.A. take out 
an Institutional Membership in the Naismith 
Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to send a 
contribution of $1,000.00 to the Hall of 
Fame. The motion was carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the insurance subsidy for 
each Association member school be the same 
for 1961-62 as it has been for the past two 
school years, namely, a basic amount of 
$30.00., with an additional subsidy of $30.00 
for each school maintaining football. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

At the request of the manager of the 



Paae Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



State Golf Tournament, J. B. Mansfield re- 
commended that the qualifiying score be 
reduced from 340 to 328 in regional play for 
a team and that the individual have a score 
of 82 or less in order to qualify for the state 
tournament. Also, that a maximum of four 
boys be allowed to represent a school. W. B. 
Jones moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that the recommendation be approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the bills of the Association 
for the period beginning March 17, 1961, and 
ending April 21, 1961, be allowed. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Board of Control then went into 
executive session. After a discussion of 
salaries, Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
K. G. Gillaspie, that Theo. A. Sanford be 
re-elected Commissioner of the K.H.S.A.A. 
for a four vear term, beginning July 1, 1961, 
at an annual salary of $12,000.00. The 
motion was carried unanimously. W. H. 
Crowdus moved seconded by Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, that J. B. Mansfield be re-elected As- 
sistant Commissioner of the K.H.S.A.A. for 
a four year term, beginning July 1, 1961, 
at an annual salary of $10,000.00. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



K.A.P.O.S. NEWS 

SOMETHING TO CHEER ABOUT? 
K.A.P.O.S. has the following to cheer about; 
22 schools ioined the KAPOS association 
during the State Tournament, 45 sponsors 
and cheerleaders attended the KAPOS coffee 
at the Phoenix Hotel on Saturday morning, 
50 or more cheerleaders and sponsors were 
interviewed over the net works during the 
State Tournament, 24 dozen or more specta- 
tors stopped by the KAPOS booth to com- 
ment on the fine work the cheerleaders were 
doing in controlling the conduct of their fans, 
100 or more people stopped by the KAPOS 
booth to admire the cheerleader trophies 
and to make known their choice for the first 
place trophy, and 23 cheerleaders and spon- 
sors signed up for the new Kentucky Cheer- 
leader Camp. 

OUR SINCERE THANKS TO Mr. Theo. 
A. Sanford and Mr. J. B. Mansfield for their 
continued support and encouragement, K.H. 
S.A.A. President Louis Litchfield for the 
generous remarks he made when presenting 
the cheerleader ti'ophies, principals Garland 
Kemper, Earl S. Duncan, Robert B. Clem, 
Rov Lawrence, Salvatore Matarazzo. W. H. 
Holloway and James C. Bruce for releasing 




Seneca Cheerleaders 

their KAPOS faculty member for services 
such as cheerleader judge, hotel chaperone, 
etc., during the State Tournament; Mrs. 
RosemaiT Weddington for the artistic signs 
she made for the KAPOS booth and for 
assuming the responsibility of seeing that 
the comments of the cheerleader judges 
reached the school sponsor. 

OUR CONGRATULATIONS TO the 
Seneca High School cheerleaders for being 
judged the outstanding cheerleader squad 
at the 1961 State Tournament, to the Hen- 
derson High School cheerleaders who were 
voted the Runner-Up Cup in the State Tour- 
nament and to the Christian County High 
School for receiving Honorable Mention. 

ENROLL NOW FOR THE SUMMER 
CHEERLEADER CAMP. August 6-10. All 
phases of cheerleading will be covered by 
the competent staff of the National Cheer- 
leaders Association. The camp is located on 
the picturesque Kentucky River at Valley 
View, Kentucky. The total cost will be 
$35.00. This includes all instructional costs, 
meals, lodging, and use of the recreational 
facilities. A $10.00 fee must be submitted in 
advance. Sponsors are especially welcome 
and urged to mail in their special interests 
so that discussion groups can be set up to 
deal with these problems. For further in- 
formation write to: Kentucky Cheerleader 
Camp, Box 1289, Lexington, Kentucky or 
Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. Mildred Rodes, 
Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 

KAPOS WELCOMES THE FOLLOW- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



Page Eleven 



ING NEW MEMBERS: Augusta High 
School, Boone County High School, Bunche 
High School, Beaver Dam High School, 
Bloomfield High School, Eastern High 
Scihool, Eminence High School, Frederick- 
town High School. Greensburg High School, 
Holy Cross High School, Hellier High School, 
Inez High School, Lafayette Junior High 
School, Lancaster High School, Mackville 
High School, Mason County High Sdhool, 
Memorial High School. Murray High School, 
North Marshall High School, Shelbv County 
High School, St. Charles High School, Wheel- 
wright High School. 

Sincerely, 
Stella S. Gilb 

Exec. Sec'y K.A.P.O.S. 



K,H.S,C.A, 

Annual Biis'ne?s Meeting 
Held in Louisville, April .5, 1961 

The annual business meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association was held at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky, at 7:30 p.m. 
on Wednesday, April 5, 1961, with 85 members pre- 
sent. 

President Wallace Sydnor called the meeting to 
order. George Claiborne, Daviess County, moved, sec- 
onded by John Snowden, Versailles, that the reading 
of the minutes of the 1960 meeting be dispensed with, 
since they are published annually in the Athlete, 
official publication of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association. The motion carried. 

A financial report of the All-Star Account and 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Association was 
made by Sec.-Treas. Joe Ohr. After the report was 
made, the members were asked if an auditing com- 
mittee should be appointed. On a motion by Estill 
Branham, North Warren, and seconded by N. L. Passi- 
more, Dunbar, and the vote of those present, the 
auditing committee was not appointed, since the re- 
port was made from the annual audit. 

The guest speaker, T. L. Plain, basketball coach 
of Kentucky Wesleyan College, Owensboro, and a 
former member of the K.H.S.C.A|, was presented to 
the members by Pres. Sydnor. Coach Plain's speech, 
"Basketball Trends," covering shooting, height, team 
play, i-ules, defense and democracy, was informative, 
amusing, and well presented. 

Two of Kentucky's finest coaches were recognized 
for their outstanding teams in the 1960 football sea- 
son and the 1961 basketball season. Homer Rice 
(Highlands) was presented a football trophy for his 
being chosen "Coach of the Year," while Bob Wright 
(Ashland) was elected "Coach of the Year" in basket- 
ball. He received a basketball trophy. Wright's Ash- 
land Tomcats won the Kentucky High School Champ- 
ionship. Richard "Puss" Greenwell ( Shelby ville) and 
Hardin McLane (Elizabethtown Catholic) presented 
the respective coaches to the assembly. 

A proposal offered by the 22nd District to hold 
the annual K.H.S.C.A. meeting on Friday morning of 
the State Basketball Tournament was defeated by a 
vote of 46-12. 

The proposal for the changing of the time and 
place of the annual meeting brought considerable 



discussion from the members. Ralph McRight (Tilgh- 
man) in a talk to the members reminded the group 
that the K.H.S.C.A. should remain identified with the 
K.E.A. meeting. As a partial solution to the problem, 
McRight moved and John Hackett (Ft. Knox) sec- 
onded that two meetings be held each year, one meet- 
ing to be held at the site and time of the State 
Basketball Tournament and the other at the time of 
the Kentucky Education Association. This motion 
failed to carry by a 35-1 vote. 

Two coaches were nominated for the office of 
Sgt.-At-Arms. James Boyd, (Anderson County) and 
Bob Wright (Ashland) were voted on by the members 
with Wright being elected. 

Denzil Ramsey (Shepherdsville) moved that Joe 
Ohr be re-elected Secretary-Treasurer by acclamation. 
Motion carried. 

Several coaches, including John Meihaus (St. 
Xavier), L. J. Charmoli (Manual), James McAfee 
(Versailles), and Denzil Ramsey (Shepherdsville) 
voiced their opinion that the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association hold a clinic on football, basket- 
ball, track and baseball. Coaches from the field of 
high school sports in Kentucky are to conduct clinics. 
The president was empowered to chose a committee, 
hoping this plan could become operative for the 1962 
meeting. 

Before adjournment, a membership report of 
990 members was made. Meeting adjourned at 10:10 
p.m. 



Ky. Coaches Association 

Irvine, Kv. 
March 27, 1961 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

In accordance with instructions from your secre- 
tary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have made an examination of the 
records of your organization that were submitted to 
me by Mr. Ohr for the period January 30, 1960 thru 
March 11, 1961. 

The results of the various transactions during this 
period are shown on the accompanying schedule of 
Cash Receipts and Disbursements. The balance in the 
bank of $5,659.61 has been confirmed as being on de- 
posit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, as of March 11, 1961. 

All receipts and disbursements as shovim. in the 
accompanying schedule appear to be correctly record- 
ed and are properly substantiated by cancelled checks. 

In my opinion the schedule properly reflects the 
cash receipts and disbursements as recorded for the 
period shown, and all records are in neat and orderly 
fashion. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR., Auditor 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIA- 
TION STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND 
DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 
30, 1960 THRU MARCH 11, 1961. 
RECEIPTS: 

Membership Dues and KHSAA Grant Sl.490.00 

Plus: Bank Balance Jan. 30, 1960 5,262.2S 

Total 56.752.26 

EXPENSES: 

Postage 72.00 

Delegates Expense to KEA 25.00 

Collection Expenses 1959 and 1960 476.00 

Printing 12.80 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1961 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 
FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 
Phone Triangle 3-3623 



Distributors of: 



Spanjian (Eastern Ky. only) 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. 



Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stoklev 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



Corporation Fee 2.00 

Coaeh of the Year Awards 80.11 

Secretarial Help 5.00 

Secretary Bond 31.25 

Audit of the Books 16.02 

Memorial Fund 100.00 

All Star Headquarters Expense 152.05 

Expenses to National Rules Meeting 120.42 

Total Expense Disbursements .l;i,092.65 

BALANCE $5,659.61 

Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, 

Irvine. Kentucky, on March 11, 1961 $5,659.61 

Irvine, Ky. 

March 27, 1961 
Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games of 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen : 

Upon instructions from your Secretary, Mr. Joe 
Ohr, I have examined the records of your organization 
submitted to me by Mr. Ohr for the period February 
26, 1960 through February 24, 1961. 

The results of the various transactions for this 
period are shown in the attached schedule of Cash 
Receipts and Disbursements. The balance of $13,987.03 
in the All Star Account has been confirmed as being 
on deposit in the First National Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Lexington, Kentucky. 

The records disclose total receipts from All Star 
Games ticket sales as being $7,261.25 net after ex- 
penses of ticket sellers and other expenses. Receipts 
from the sale of All Star programs amounted to 
$700.00, giving a net deposit of $7,961.25 to the All 
Star Account. 

The total cash receipts of $7,961.25 agrees in 
amount with the deposits made in the First National 
Bank & Ti-ust Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

All receipts and disbursements as shovni in the 



accompanying schedule appear to be correct and in my 
opinion this schedule presents correctly the cash re- 
cepits and disbursements on the All Star Account for 
the period stated. 

In addition to the above balance, I have confirmed 
a balance of $3,882.52 in KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
COACHES ASSOCIATIONN ACCOUNT No. 9315 
in the Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Association, 
Covington, Kentucky, as of March 30, 1961. This rep- 
resents an increase in this account of $150.84 over the 
previous year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR., Auditor 

EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL AND BAS- 
KETBALL GAMES of the KENTUCKY HIGH 
SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION STATEMENT 
OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 
THE PERIOD FROM FEBRUARY 26, 1960 THRU 
FEBRUARY 24, 1961. 
RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All Star Game $7,261.25 

Receipts from All Star Programs 700.00 

Total Receipts $7,961.25 

Plus: Bank Balance 2-29-60 14.165.82 

Total $22,127.07 

EXPENSES: 

Change for All Star Games 600.00 

Awards for All Star Players 1,451.45 

Photos 60.77 

Printing 138.59 

Manager & Coaches Salaries 1,900.00 

Traveling Expenses — Players 717.05 

Meals for All Stars & Labor 2,364.12 

Federal Tax on All-Star Games 109.62 

Kentucky Sales Tax on All Star Games 201.40 

Misc. Travel. Postage & Telephone 214.04 

Insurance 383.00 

Total Exaense Disbursements 8.140.04 

BALANCE 13,987.03 

Balance in First National Bank & Trust 

Company Lexington. Kentucky, on February 

24, 1961 13,987.03 



It's Later Than You Think! 

Have You Arranged For Your 

Student Accident And 

Athletic Coverages For 

1961-62? We Offer You 

First-Class Policies And 

Service. May We Explain 

Them To You? 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



7<4e KinffKHen Qo^n^ijcuuf' 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



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Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 






HAVE A HAPPIER VACATION — 
PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE. 

We will be very happy to accept your order now for any football or 
basketball equipment, make shipment at the earliest possible moment, and 
extend to you October 1, 1961 dating. Nationally advertised Brands — 
Complete Team Equipment — Let us take care of all your needs . . . we'll 
be glad to be of service whether you need complete team equipment or 
a few special items. 

We can also make immediate shipment on any Spring merchandise 
you might need. 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR SUMMER 
PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation pro- 
gram, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our 
salesmen will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance 
you may need. 

Thanks to our many friends and customers who visited us in Louis- 
ville during the 1961 K.E.A. Convention. It was nice to have you and we 
appreciate the nice business that you gave us for the present spring and 
summer season as well as the coming fall and winter season of football and 
basketball. 

If you need personal vacation equipment, remember — we have a 
complete stock of golf as well as fishing supplies, so just let us hear 
from you ■ — 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

— PHONES — 
CH 7-1941 CH 7-1942 CH 7-194.3 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




ShiP'Thb DaV You BuV ' 



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